Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • What do you think of when I say the word "design"?

    翻訳: Masako Kigami 校正: Mari Arimitsu

  • You probably think of things like this,

    「デザイン」という言葉から 何を思い浮かべますか?

  • finely crafted objects that you can hold in your hand,

    こういうモノですか?

  • or maybe logos and posters and maps

    手に取れる お洒落な工芸品だったり

  • that visually explain things,

    ロゴやポスター 地図など

  • classic icons of timeless design.

    視覚的に訴える

  • But I'm not here to talk about that kind of design.

    流行り廃りのないデザインではないでしょうか

  • I want to talk about the kind

    でも今日 私がお話ししたいのは

  • that you probably use every day

    そのようなデザインではなく

  • and may not give much thought to,

    おそらく毎日 使っているのに

  • designs that change all the time

    あまり考えたことがないモノ

  • and that live inside your pocket.

    デザインがよく変わるのに

  • I'm talking about the design

    持ち歩いている物についてです

  • of digital experiences

    私がお話しするのは

  • and specifically the design of systems

    デジタル体験のデザイン—

  • that are so big that their scale

    特に システムデザインについてです

  • can be hard to comprehend.

    それらはとても大きいので

  • Consider the fact that Google processes

    規模を把握しづらいのです

  • over one billion search queries every day,

    例えば Googleは毎日

  • that every minute, over 100 hours

    10億件以上の検索を処理しており

  • of footage are uploaded to YouTube.

    毎分100時間以上の映像が

  • That's more in a single day

    YouTubeにアップロードされています

  • than all three major U.S. networks broadcast

    これはアメリカの大手放送会社3社の

  • in the last five years combined.

    過去5年間の放送分を超えた映像が

  • And Facebook transmitting the photos,

    1日でアップロードされている計算です

  • messages and stories

    Facebookでは

  • of over 1.23 billion people.

    12億3千万人以上の

  • That's almost half of the Internet population,

    写真やメッセージやストーリーが 発信されています

  • and a sixth of humanity.

    これはネット人口の約半数で

  • These are some of the products

    世界の人口の6分の1にあたります

  • that I've helped design over the course of my career,

    私のキャリアを通じて

  • and their scale is so massive

    デザインに携わった製品もありますが

  • that they've produced unprecedented

    規模がとても大きいため

  • design challenges.

    これまでに無い デザイン上の

  • But what is really hard

    課題が生じています

  • about designing at scale is this:

    しかし 規模が大きなデザインの

  • It's hard in part because

    本当に難しい点とは何でしょうか

  • it requires a combination of two things,

    難しい部分は

  • audacity and humility

    2つの組み合わせで

  • audacity to believe that the thing that you're making

    「大胆さ」と「謙虚さ」です

  • is something that the entire world wants and needs,

    大胆さとは 全世界が欲して 必要とする何かを

  • and humility to understand that as a designer,

    作っていると信じることです

  • it's not about you or your portfolio,

    そして 謙虚さとは デザイナーとして

  • it's about the people that you're designing for,

    自分や自分の作品集のためではなく

  • and how your work just might help them

    誰かのためにデザインすること

  • live better lives.

    また デザインを通じて 人々の暮らしを

  • Now, unfortunately, there's no school

    いかに良くするかということです

  • that offers the course Designing for Humanity 101.

    残念なことに 「人類のためのデザイン入門」を

  • I and the other designers

    教えてくれる学校はありません

  • who work on these kinds of products

    これらの製品に関与している

  • have had to invent it as we go along,

    私や他のデザイナーは

  • and we are teaching ourselves

    模索しながら作品を生み出し

  • the emerging best practices

    切磋琢磨することで

  • of designing at scale,

    規模の大きなデザインの ベストプラクティスを

  • and today I'd like share some of the things

    見出そうとしています

  • that we've learned over the years.

    今日は私達が数年かけて

  • Now, the first thing that you need to know

    学んだことをお話ししたいと思います

  • about designing at scale

    規模の大きなデザインで

  • is that the little things really matter.

    まず知っておくべきことは

  • Here's a really good example of how

    細部が本当に重要だということです

  • a very tiny design element can make a big impact.

    これは とても小さなデザインの要素の

  • The team at Facebook that manages

    影響が いかに大きいかを 示した良い例です

  • the Facebook "Like" button

    Facebookで 「いいね!」ボタンを

  • decided that it needed to be redesigned.

    管理しているチームは

  • The button had kind of gotten out of sync

    デザインの変更を決めました

  • with the evolution of our brand

    ボタンは 私達のブランドの進化と共に

  • and it needed to be modernized.

    まとまりがなくなったので

  • Now you might think, well, it's a tiny little button,

    最新のものにする必要があったのです

  • it probably is a pretty straightforward,

    小さなボタンに過ぎない

  • easy design assignment, but it wasn't.

    かなり単純で簡単なデザインだと

  • Turns out, there were all kinds of constraints

    思われるでしょう それが違うんです

  • for the design of this button.

    このボタンには デザイン上の

  • You had to work within specific height and width parameters.

    様々な制約がありました

  • You had to be careful to make it work

    縦横の決まった設定値内で 作成する必要があるのです

  • in a bunch of different languages,

    多言語で機能するよう

  • and be careful about using fancy gradients or borders

    気を配る必要もありました

  • because it has to degrade gracefully

    また お洒落なグラデーションや ボーダーも要注意です

  • in old web browsers.

    昔ながらのウェブブラウザの

  • The truth is, designing this tiny little button

    優雅さを損なうからです

  • was a huge pain in the butt.

    ですから この小さなボタンのデザインには

  • Now, this is the new version of the button,

    大変苦労しました

  • and the designer who led this project estimates

    そして これが新しいバージョンです

  • that he spent over 280 hours

    このプロジェクトのデザイナーは

  • redesigning this button over the course of months.

    280時間以上 つまり何か月もかけて

  • Now, why would we spend so much time

    このボタンのデザイン変更に 取り組みました

  • on something so small?

    なぜ こんなに小さなものに

  • It's because when you're designing at scale,

    膨大な時間を費やすのでしょうか?

  • there's no such thing as a small detail.

    規模が大きなデザインを作る場合

  • This innocent little button

    些細なものなどないからです

  • is seen on average 22 billion times a day

    この他愛のない 小さなボタンが

  • and on over 7.5 million websites.

    1日に平均して220億回

  • It's one of the single most viewed design elements ever created.

    750万以上のウェブサイトで 閲覧されているのです

  • Now that's a lot of pressure for a little button

    今までに最もよく見られた デザインの1つです

  • and the designer behind it,

    小さなボタンにしては とてつもない重圧で

  • but with these kinds of products,

    その裏にはデザイナーがいますが

  • you need to get even the tiny things right.

    この種のデザインは

  • Now, the next thing that you need to understand

    細部まできちんとする必要があるのです

  • is how to design with data.

    次に理解すべきことは

  • Now, when you're working on products like this,

    データを伴うデザインの方法です

  • you have incredible amounts of information

    このような製品を作る時は

  • about how people are using your product

    その製品がどのように使われるかという

  • that you can then use to influence

    膨大な情報を集めることが

  • your design decisions,

    デザインを決める際に

  • but it's not just as simple as following the numbers.

    有用になります

  • Let me give you an example

    でも数に従えばいい というものではありません

  • so that you can understand what I mean.

    ご理解いただくために

  • Facebook has had a tool for a long time

    例を挙げて説明します

  • that allowed people to report photos

    Facebookは長い間

  • that may be in violation of our community standards,

    私達のコミュニティ基準に 違反する写真—

  • things like spam and abuse.

    スパムや嫌がらせを 報告できる

  • And there were a ton of photos reported,

    ツールを持っています

  • but as it turns out,

    報告を受けた写真は大量にありましたが

  • only a small percentage were actually

    蓋を開けてみると

  • in violation of those community standards.

    コミュニティの基準に違反したものは

  • Most of them were just your typical party photo.

    実際は わずかしかありません

  • Now, to give you a specific hypothetical example,

    大半は典型的なパーティーの写真でした

  • let's say my friend Laura hypothetically

    ある例を紹介しましょう

  • uploads a picture of me

    私の友人のローラが —仮にですが—

  • from a drunken night of karaoke.

    カラオケの飲み会での

  • This is purely hypothetical, I can assure you.

    私の写真をアップロードするとします

  • (Laughter)

    あくまで例です 念を押しておきます

  • Now, incidentally,

    (笑)

  • you know how some people are kind of worried

    ちなみに

  • that their boss or employee

    Facebook上で

  • is going to discover embarrassing photos of them

    上司や同僚に

  • on Facebook?

    自分の恥ずかしい写真を見られることを

  • Do you know how hard that is to avoid

    心配する人もいます

  • when you actually work at Facebook?

    Facebookで働いている人間には

  • So anyway, there are lots of these photos

    避けて通れません

  • being erroneously reported as spam and abuse,

    とにかく 誤って スパムや嫌がらせと

  • and one of the engineers on the team had a hunch.

    報告された写真は多いのです

  • He really thought there was something else going on

    チームの技術者の一人には 先見の明がありました

  • and he was right,

    本当にこれから起こることを

  • because when he looked through a bunch of the cases,

    正しく見通していたのです

  • he found that most of them

    彼が多くのケースを検証したところ

  • were from people who were requesting

    自分が写っている写真を

  • the takedown of a photo of themselves.

    削除してほしいという

  • Now this was a scenario that the team

    要望が大半だったのです

  • never even took into account before.

    これはチームが考えたこともない

  • So they added a new feature

    シナリオでした

  • that allowed people to message their friend

    そこで 友人にメッセージを送って

  • to ask them to take the photo down.

    写真の削除を依頼するという

  • But it didn't work.

    新しい機能を追加しました

  • Only 20 percent of people

    でも うまく行きませんでした

  • sent the message to their friend.

    20%しか友人に

  • So the team went back at it.

    メッセージを送らなかったのです

  • They consulted with experts in conflict resolution.

    そのため チームは 行き詰ってしまいました

  • They even studied the universal principles

    そこで 調停の専門家に相談し

  • of polite language,

    婉曲表現の普遍原理についても

  • which I didn't even actually know existed

    学びました

  • until this research happened.

    私は婉曲表現というものを

  • And they found something really interesting.

    この研究が行われるまで 知りませんでした

  • They had to go beyond just helping people

    そして 面白いことを見つけたのです

  • ask their friend to take the photo down.

    友人に写真の削除依頼をする以上の 手助けをしたのです

  • They had to help people express to their friend

    友人に写真の削除依頼をする以上の 手助けをしたのです

  • how the photo made them feel.

    その写真でどんな気持ちになったかを

  • Here's how the experience works today.

    友人に伝えることにしたのです

  • So I find this hypothetical photo of myself,

    その経験が今に役立っています

  • and it's not spam, it's not abuse,

    例えば私がこの写真を見つけたとします

  • but I really wish it weren't on the site.

    スパムでも嫌がらせでもありません

  • So I report it and I say,

    でも 私はFacebookに載せて欲しくありません

  • "I'm in this photo and I don't like it,"

    そこでFacebookに報告するのは

  • and then we dig deeper.

    「この写真に自分が写っているのが好ましくない」

  • Why don't you like this photo of yourself?

    それから更に掘り下げます

  • And I select "It's embarrassing."

    なぜこの写真が 好きではないのでしょうか?

  • And then I'm encouraged to message my friend,

    「恥ずかしいから」を選択します

  • but here's the critical difference.

    すると 友達にメッセージを送るよう促されます

  • I'm provided specific suggested language

    これが大きな違いを生むのです

  • that helps me communicate to Laura

    奨励される特定の言葉を選んで この写真によって

  • how the photo makes me feel.

    私がどう感じたかを

  • Now the team found that this relatively small change

    ローラに伝えることができます

  • had a huge impact.

    私のチームは このちょっとした変化の

  • Before, only 20 percent of people

    影響力が甚大なことに気づきました

  • were sending the message,

    以前は20%の人しか

  • and now 60 percent were,

    メッセージを送らなかったのに

  • and surveys showed that people

    今では60%の人が送っています

  • on both sides of the conversation

    各種の調査によると

  • felt better as a result.

    双方の会話で 結果的に良くなったと

  • That same survey showed

    感じていることが分かりました

  • that 90 percent of your friends

    同じ調査で

  • want to know if they've done something to upset you.

    友人の90%が どうして怒らせたのか

  • Now I don't know who the other 10 percent are,

    知りたいと思っていることも分かりました

  • but maybe that's where our "Unfriend" feature

    残りの10%については分かりませんが

  • can come in handy.

    「友達解除」機能が

  • So as you can see,

    役立つかもしれません

  • these decisions are highly nuanced.

    ご覧の通り

  • Of course we use a lot of data

    これらの決定は非常に微妙なのです

  • to inform our decisions,

    もちろん 決定を通知するために

  • but we also rely very heavily on iteration,

    沢山のデータを使いますが

  • research, testing, intuition, human empathy.

    私達が多いに頼るのは 反復

  • It's both art and science.

    研究 テスト 直感 人情などです

  • Now, sometimes the designers who work on these products

    アートであり 科学なのです

  • are called "data-driven,"

    さて このような製品を作るデザイナーを

  • which is a term that totally drives us bonkers.

    時に「データ駆動型」と呼びます

  • The fact is, it would be irresponsible of us

    私達を完全に虜にする言葉です

  • not to rigorously test our designs

    私達は自分達のデザインを厳密に

  • when so many people are counting on us

    テストする責任があります

  • to get it right,

    多くの人々から きちんとするよう

  • but data analytics

    期待されているのですから

  • will never be a substitute for design intuition.

    でもデータ分析は

  • Data can help you make a good design great,

    デザインのインスピレーションにはなりません

  • but it will never made a bad design good.

    データは良いデザインを 素晴らしいものにできますが

  • The next thing that you need to understand as a principle

    悪いデザインを良くすることは できないのです

  • is that when you introduce change,

    次に原則として 理解すべきは

  • you need to do it extraordinarily carefully.

    変更を導入する時で

  • Now I often have joked that

    非常に注意を払う必要があります

  • I spend almost as much time

    私がよく使う冗談ですが

  • designing the introduction of change

    変更自体に掛ける時間と

  • as I do the change itself,

    同じくらい 変更を導入する時の

  • and I'm sure that we can all relate to that

    デザインに時間を費やします

  • when something that we use a lot changes

    それは私達がよく使う物が変化し

  • and then we have to adjust.

    慣れる必要がある時と

  • The fact is, people can become

    すべて繋がっているのです

  • very efficient at using bad design,

    実際 私達は悪いデザインを

  • and so even if the change is good for them in the long run,

    とても効率よく使うことができます

  • it's still incredibly frustrating when it happens,

    長期的には 変更が良いことであっても

  • and this is particularly true

    変更されると 物凄くイライラします

  • with user-generated content platforms,

    ユーザーが内容を作るものなら

  • because people can rightfully claim a sense of ownership.

    なおさらです

  • It is, after all, their content.

    持ち主が自分のものだと 主張できるからです

  • Now, years ago, when I was working at YouTube,

    事実 ユーザーが書いた内容なのですから

  • we were looking for ways to

    何年も前 YouTubeで働いていた時

  • encourage more people to rate videos,

    もっと多くの人に ビデオを評価してもらう

  • and it was interesting because when we looked into the data,

    方法を模索していました

  • we found that almost everyone was exclusively using

    データを見て面白いと感じたことは

  • the highest five-star rating,

    大半の人が 最高の5つ星評価だけを使い

  • a handful of people were using

    大半の人が 最高の5つ星評価だけを使い

  • the lowest one-star,

    一握りの人が

  • and virtually no one

    最低の1つ星評価をしたのです

  • was using two, three or four stars.

    そして 実際 誰一人として

  • So we decided to simplify

    2つ星、3つ星、4つ星を 使いませんでした"

  • into an up-down kind of voting binary model.

    そこで デザインを単純化し

  • It's going to be much easier for people to engage with.

    良いか悪いかの2つで 投票するようにしました

  • But people were very attached

    誰でも参加できるよう 単純になりましたが

  • to the five-star rating system.

    ユーザーは5つ星評価の方に

  • Video creators really loved their ratings.

    馴染みがありました

  • Millions and millions of people

    ビデオ製作者は 評価されるのが大好きでした

  • were accustomed to the old design.

    何百万人もの人が

  • So in order to help people

    従来のデザインに馴染んでいました

  • prepare themselves for change

    そのため ユーザーに

  • and acclimate to the new design more quickly,

    変化に適応し もっと早く

  • we actually published the data graph

    新しいデザインに慣れてもらうため

  • sharing with the community

    データやグラフを

  • the rationale for what we were going to do,

    コミュニティと共有しながら

  • and it even engaged the larger industry

    何をしようとしているのかを 説明しました

  • in a conversation, which resulted in

    この会話を通じて 大きな業界と関わることができ

  • my favorite TechCrunch headline of all time:

    結果的に 私の一番お気に入りの

  • "YouTube Comes to a 5-Star Realization:

    TechCrunchの見出しになりました