Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • So I started working with refugees because I wanted to make a difference,

  • and making a difference starts with telling their stories.

  • So when I meet refugees I always ask them questions.

  • Who bombed your house?

  • Who killed your son?

  • Did the rest of your family make it out alive?

  • How are you coping in your life in exile?

  • But there's one question that always seems to me to be most revealing, and that is:

  • What did you take?

  • What was that most important thing that you had to take with you when the bombs were exploding in your town

  • and the armed gangs were approaching your house?

  • A Syrian refugee boy I know told me that

  • he didn't hesitate when his life was in imminent danger.

  • He took his high school diploma,

  • and later he told me why.

  • He said, “I took my high school diploma because my life depended on it.”

  • And he would risk his life to get that diploma.

  • On his way to school, he would dodge snipers.

  • His classroom sometimes shook with the sound of bombs and shelling.

  • And his mother told me,

  • Everyday I would say to him every morning

  • Honey, please don't go to school.

  • And when he insisted, she said,

  • I would hug him as if it were for the last time.

  • But he said to his mother,

  • We're all afraid,

  • but our determination to graduate is stronger than our fear.

  • But one day, the family got terrible news.

  • Hany's aunt, his uncle and his cousin

  • were murdered in their homes for refusing to leave their house.

  • Their throats were slit.

  • It was time to flee.

  • They left that day, right away, in their car,

  • Hany hidden in the back because they were facing checkpoints of menacing soldiers.

  • And they would cross the border into Lebanon,

  • where they would find peace.

  • But they would begin a life of grueling hardship and monotony.

  • They had no choice but to build a shack on the side of a muddy field,

  • and this is Hany's brother Ashraf, who plays outside.

  • And that day, they joined the biggest population of refugees in the world,

  • in a country, Lebanon, that is tiny.

  • It only has 4 million citizens,

  • and there are 1 million Syrian refugees living there.

  • There's not a town, a city or a village that is not host to Syrian refugees.

  • This is generosity and humanity that is remarkable.

  • Think about it this way, proportionately.

  • It would be as if the entire population of Germany, 80 million people,

  • would flee to the United States in just 3 years.

  • Half of the entire population of Syria is now uprooted,

  • most of them inside the country. Six and a half million people had fled for their lives.

  • Over and well over 3 million people have crossed the borders

  • and have found sanctuary in the neighboring countries,

  • and only a small proportion, as you see, have moved on to Europe.

  • What I find most worrying is that

  • half of all Syrian refugees are children.

  • I took this picture of this little girl.

  • It was just two hours after she had arrived after a long trek from Syria into Jordan.

  • And most troubling of all

  • is that only 20 percent of Syrian refugee children are in school in Lebanon.

  • And yet, Syrian refugee children, all refugee children tell us,

  • education is the most important thing in their lives.

  • Why?

  • Because it allows them to think of their future rather than the nightmare of their past.

  • It allows them to think of hope rather than hatred.

  • I'm reminded of a recent visit I took to a Syrian refugee camp in northern Iraq,

  • and I met this girl, and I thought, she's beautiful,

  • and I went up to her and asked her, “Can I take your picture?”

  • And she said yes,

  • but she refused to smile.

  • I think she couldn't,

  • because I think she must realize that she represents a lost generation of Syrian refugee children,

  • a generation isolated and frustrated.

  • And yet, look at what they fled:

  • utter destruction, buildings, industries,

  • schools, roads, homes.

  • Hany's home was also destroyed.

  • This will need to be rebuilt

  • by architects, by engineers, by electricians.

  • Communities will need teachers and lawyers

  • and politicians interested in reconciliation and not revenge.

  • Shouldn't this be rebuilt by the people with the largest stake,

  • the societies in exile, the refugees?

  • Refugees have a lot of time to prepare for their return.

  • You might imagine that being a refugee is just a temporary state

  • Well, far from it.

  • With wars going on and on,

  • the average time a refugee will spend in exile is 17 years.

  • Hany was into his second year in limbo when I went to visit him recently,

  • and we conducted our entire conversation in English,

  • which he confessed to me he learned from reading all of Dan Brown's novels

  • and from listening to American rap.

  • We also spent some nice moments of laughter and fun with his beloved brother Ashraf.

  • But I'll never forget what he told me when we ended our conversation that day.

  • He said to me,

  • If I am not a student, I am nothing.”

  • Hany is one of 50 million people uprooted in this world today.

  • Never have since World War II have so many people been forcibly displaced.

  • So while we're making sweeping progress in human health,

  • in technology, in education and design,

  • we are doing dangerously little to help the victims

  • and we're doing far too little to stop and prevent the wars that are driving them from their homes.

  • And there are more and more victims.

  • Everyday, on average, by the end of this day,

  • 32,000 people will be forcibly displaced from their homes.

  • 32,000 people.

  • They flee across borders like this one.

  • We captured this on the Syrian border to Jordan,

  • and this is a typical day.

  • Or they flee on unseaworthy and overcrowded boats,

  • risking their lives, in this case, just to reach safety in Europe.

  • This Syrian young man survived one of these boats that capsized,

  • most of the people drowned,

  • and he told us,

  • Syrians are just looking for a quiet place,

  • where nobody hurts you,

  • where nobody humiliates you

  • and where nobody kills you

  • Well I think that should be the minimum.

  • How about a place of healing, of learning, and even opportunity?

  • You know, Americans and Europeans have the impression that,

  • proportionally huge numbers of refugees are coming to their country.

  • But the reality is

  • that 86 percent, vast majority of refugees, are living in the developing world.

  • In countries struggling with their own insecurity,

  • with their own issues of helping their own populations and poverty.

  • So wealthy countries in the world should recognize

  • the humanity and the generosity of the countries that are hosting so many refugees

  • And all countries should make sure that no one fleeing war and persecution arrives at a closed border.

  • Thank you.

  • But there's something more that we can do than just simply helping refugees survive.

  • We can help them thrive.

  • We should think of refugee camps and communities as more than just temporary population centers,

  • where people languish waiting for the war to end.

  • Rather, as centers of excellence,

  • where refugees can triumph over their trauma

  • and train for the day that they can go home

  • as agents of positive change and social transformation.

  • It makes so much sense,

  • but I'm reminded of the terrible war in Somalia

  • that has been raging on for 22 years.

  • And imagine living in this camp.

  • I've visited this camp. It's in Djibouti, neighboring Somalia,

  • and it was so remote that we had to take a helicopter to fly there.

  • It was dusty and it was terribly hot.

  • And we went to visit the school

  • and started talking to the children, and then I saw this girl across the room

  • who looked to me to be the same age as my own daughter, and I went up and talked to her.

  • And I asked her the questions that grown-ups ask kids, like,

  • What is your favourite subject?”

  • andWhat do you want to be when you grow up?”

  • And this is when her face turned blank,

  • and she said to me,

  • “I have no future. My schooling days are over.”

  • And I thought there must be some misunderstanding, so I turned to my colleague

  • and she confirmed to me there is no funding for secondary education in this camp.

  • And how I wished at that moment that I could say to her,

  • We will build you a school.”

  • And I also thought, what a waste.

  • She should be and she is the future of Somalia.

  • A boy named Jacob Atem had a different chance,

  • but not before he experienced terrible tragedy.

  • He watched, this is in Sudan,

  • as his village, he was only seven years old,burned to the ground,

  • and he learned that his mother and his father and his entire family were killed that day.

  • Only his cousin survived and the two of them walked for 7 months,

  • this is boys like him,

  • chased and pursued by wild animals and armed gangs,

  • and they finally made it to refugee camps where they found safety,

  • and he would spend the next 7 years in Kenya in a refugee camp.

  • But his life changed when he got the chance to be resettled to the United States,

  • and he found love in a foster family

  • and he was able to go to school.

  • And he wanted me to share with you this proud moment

  • when he graduated from university.

  • I spoke to him on Skype the other day

  • and he was in his new university in Florida,

  • pursuing his PhD in public health.

  • And he proudly told me how he was able to raise enough funds from the American public

  • to establish a health clinic back in his village back home.

  • So I want to take you back to Hany.

  • When I told him I was going to have the chance to speak to you here on the TED stage,

  • he allowed me to read you a poem that he sent in an email to me.

  • He wrote,

  • “I miss myself, my friends,

  • times of reading novels or writing poems,

  • birds and tea in the morning.

  • My room, my books,

  • myself,

  • and everything that was making me smile.

  • Oh, oh, I had so many dreams that were about to be realized.”

  • So here's my point:

  • Not investing in refugees is a huge missed opportunity.

  • Leave them abandoned and they risk exploitation and abuse,

  • and leave them unskilled and uneducated,

  • and delay by years the return to peace and prosperity in their countries.

  • I believe how we treat the uprooted will shape the future of our world.

  • The victims of war can hold the keys to lasting peace,

  • and it's the refugees who can stop the cycle of violence.

  • Hany is at a tipping point.

  • We would love to help him go to university and to become an engineer,

  • but our funds are prioritize for the basics in life,

  • tents and blankets and mattresses and kitchen sets,

  • food rations and a bit of medicine.

  • University is a luxury.

  • But leave him to languish in this muddy field

  • and he will become a member of a lost generation.

  • Hany's story is a tragedy,

  • but it doesn't have to end that way.

  • Thank you.

So I started working with refugees because I wanted to make a difference,

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級

TED】メリッサ・フレミング。難民が生き残るだけではなく、繁栄するのを助けよう (【TED】Melissa Fleming: Let’s help refugees thrive, not just survive)

  • 7877 599
    Go Tutor に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語