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  • North and South Part Two

  • You're not to go upstairs, Miss Margaret.

  • Why not?

  • Dr Donaldson's up there with your mama.

  • He's given her a thorough examination this time.

  • Does he say what it is?

  • She's... She's poorly at the moment, but she'll get better directly,

  • so you're not to worry, miss.

  • - Ah. - Dr Donaldson.

  • Yes. Ah, thank you.

  • May I trouble you to come into the sitting room?

  • Yes, certainly.

  • You may go, Dixon.

  • Very well, miss.

  • What is the matter with Mama?

  • Well, your mother has expressly asked me not to tell you.

  • Please tell me, Doctor. As her daughter, I ought to know.

  • Are my suspicions correct? Tell me the truth.

  • The latest discoveries of medical science have given us great powers of alleviation.

  • - But no cure? - No certain cure, no.

  • Thank you.

  • My father, ought he to be told?

  • Well, it's difficult to give advice, but since you ask me,

  • I'd say do nothing precipitate.

  • No, my visits by themselves will deepens concern,

  • so make him all the better able to face the inevitable.

  • Yes, allow him to find out in his own good time and then comfort him.

  • Will there be much suffering?

  • That we cannot tell. It depends on her constitution.

  • I shall do my best to provide her with all the... all the relief possible.

  • Thank you.

  • Good day, Doctor.

  • Good day, Miss Hale.

  • May I, Mama?

  • Yes, of course, child.

  • I thought I would bring my work up here.

  • - Company for you. - That's very kind of you, Margaret.

  • What are you making?

  • It's a new collar.

  • - Do you Iike it? - It's very pretty.

  • Mama, oh, Mama, let me be your nurse.

  • Oh, no, Margaret. That's Dixon's job.

  • Please let me try, at any rate.

  • You don't know what you're asking.

  • Oh, yes, I do.

  • You've not been seeing Dr Donaldson?

  • Oh, surely he wouldn't break his promise to me.

  • Yes, Mama, he did, but don't blame him. I made him tell me.

  • That was very wrong of you, Margaret. I didn't want you to know.

  • But I'm glad that I know, Mama. Well, now I can help look after you.

  • Dixon and I thought you would shrink from me if you knew.

  • How could she?

  • How dare she think I don't love you enough to want to take care of you?

  • You mustn't hate her.

  • I'm sorry, Mama.

  • I will try to be humble and learn her ways.

  • If you will only let me be in the first place.

  • I so long for that.

  • When I was away in London, I used to be afraid that you would forget me.

  • I'd cry myself to sleep at nights imagining it.

  • And I used to think,

  • ''How will Margaret ever bear Helstone after the luxury of Harley Street?''

  • And all the time I pined for Helstone and its simple ways.

  • When I was at Helstone, I was forever wanting to leave it.

  • And now I shall die far away from it.

  • Mama, you must not talk Iike that.

  • We will have you back at Helstone yet.

  • We'll see.

  • I've taken the Iiberty of making you a fresh lemon drink, ma'am.

  • Thank you, Dixon.

  • Why, bless her.

  • She's as sweet as a nut.

  • Ma'am?

  • Yes, Dixon, she knows.

  • You saidst, Nick, on Wednesday sennight, afore a fortnight was up

  • we'd have the masters down on their knees begging for us to come back.

  • Well, where am them?

  • You'm winning. Tha' must nae fret.

  • Patience, John. Patience.

  • What use is cowing patience?

  • I got a missus at death's door.

  • Don't stand dawdIing, miss. Come on in.

  • This is Mr Boucher, neighbour.

  • Morning, Mr Boucher.

  • Bessy, how are you?

  • I'm telling you, Nick, my missus is sinking away. 'Tis pitiful to see her.

  • You're drawing your five shillings of union money, ain't you?

  • Five shillings a week may be good enough for thee with but two mouths to fill.

  • - I've got six children, six of them. - It's hard for you, John.

  • But you must hold on.

  • I'll be damned to you, damned to the whole sowing worId, masters and unions.

  • - To hell with you! - Women, John. Women.

  • Take Bessy a stroll, will you, Margaret?

  • Come on, Bessy.

  • Hou'd up, man.

  • Thy shall na' claim.

  • What's mine is thine if thou't want.

  • Here, take it. Here.

  • Soon as you get your five per cent, pay me back.

  • We'll never get that five per cent, you must know that.

  • Then we fall, all honest.

  • As you've witnessed, John, starvation's a cruel agony,

  • so let death come at a gallop.

  • If we'm doomed, then thou'll want these paltry coins. Here, take it.

  • And I hope they might bide you and yours to the victory.

  • If I takes this money,

  • I'm one of you, got it?

  • I'm a proud man, Nick, and I'll out-union you, you see if I don't.

  • Take it.

  • Well, I think we've come to the end of our lesson for tonight, Mr Thornton.

  • Aye.

  • Aye, we've done a good stretch.

  • What a work, Mr Thornton, is the lliad.

  • What a work.

  • The heroes standing or falling by their own personal courage.

  • Faithful and determined.

  • A lesson to all of us, especially at a time Iike this.

  • Oh, by the way, Mr Hale, I've been intending to mention it.

  • - What is that, Mr Thornton? - I'm giving a dinner party next week.

  • I would be very happy to invite you and Mrs Hale.

  • Very kind of you.

  • Margaret, Mr Thornton is inviting your mother and me to dine with him.

  • It's next Thursday.

  • The other guests will be the principal manufacturers in the town.

  • But won't we be a Iittle out of place?

  • Not at all. They'll be delighted to meet you.

  • They're all very keenly interested in education.

  • It is kind of you, Mr Thornton,

  • to say that by meeting your friends my father might find pupils.

  • It's very Iikely.

  • I don't know about your part of the worId, but in this,

  • much can be achieved over a good meal.

  • Mr Thornton, I'm afraid that my mother may not be well enough to attend.

  • She is a Iittle poorly at the moment,

  • but I'm sure that the notion of going out to dine

  • will put fresh heart into her.

  • I'm sorry to hear that Mrs Hale is unwell.

  • If she cannot attend, then I fully understand.

  • Might I make a suggestion?

  • Miss Hale, would you grace my table by accompanying your father,

  • whether Mrs Hale can come or not?

  • - I attend? - Yes.

  • Mr Thornton, I appreciate your kindness and your courtesy,

  • but you put me in something of a predicament.

  • What is that, Margaret?

  • You know my feelings towards the strike, Papa.

  • I've found friends among the poorer people

  • and I've seen the hardships they're suffering.

  • Miss Hale, I admire your scruples.

  • - But they are unwarranted. - Unwarranted?

  • If you've seen suffering, they've brought in on themselves.

  • - I didn't start this strike. - They are only demanding a just wage.

  • What is a just wage?

  • Ten shillings a week? Ten pounds? A hundred? What is a just wage?

  • I don't know.

  • All I know is that they want a better Iife.

  • So do we all, but what we've got is here and now,

  • and it's governed by strict economic principles.

  • A delicate balance between cost of labour, market, consumption and supply.

  • I do not understand the details of trade, Mr Thornton.

  • Then it's a pity.

  • And it's a pity the workers don't take the trouble to find out either.

  • If wages keep on going up and up,

  • your gold sovereign won't be worth a brass farthing!

  • You can't just up wages up like that and they're fools who think they can!

  • I'm sorry. I spoke hastily and...I...fear rudely.

  • Mr Hale, for all of your lessons, I'm still a coarse manufacturer.

  • Miss Hale...I hope you will forgive me.

  • Certainly.

  • (Piano scales)

  • Jane, would you go and ask Miss Fanny to stop that noise?

  • Yes, ma'am.

  • (Piano stops)

  • (Discordant notes)

  • (Piano lid thuds)

  • How dare you, Mother! How dare you interrupt my practising!

  • I can't stand your row, so you'll stop it.

  • - I'll what? - We'll have no more piano.

  • This is the first time, the very first time in my life,

  • I have been able to practise without all the din of the works out there.

  • Well, I'd give my right arm to have it back.

  • - What? - The machinery back.

  • There's your music.

  • It's the only music I want.

  • You've no culture, Mother. Do you know that?

  • For all your mother-of-pearl inlay,

  • you'll stay common till your last breath.

  • I'd rather be common than go soft like my children.

  • You and your brother make a fine pair.

  • It's because we've got accomplishments, isn't it?

  • Well, you can't get far in this worId without accomplishments,

  • and my fingering's one of them.

  • Walter says I've got perfect fingering.

  • Well, you take your opportunity... and marry him.

  • Mother!

  • If I know Slickson's son, he's out for our money.

  • Well, we've got a good chance of ending up as paupers,

  • so you make sure of him while you can.

  • It's enough to bring on one of my swooning fits.

  • I'm delicate.

  • Well, I've just seen Hamper.

  • He wants to come to terms with them, give them a two per cent increase.

  • - Well? - I've told him we can't.

  • It'd be suicide. He's gotta wait till the Irish workers arrive.

  • When do they arrive?

  • The agent in Dublin won't give me a specific date.

  • I pray to God it's soon.

  • Now, just you hammer it into those mill owners at dinner on Thursday,

  • Irish workers are the only answer.

  • Aye.

  • Mother, can I wear my blue silk dress?

  • - Eh? - At the dinner on Thursday.

  • For goodness sake, girI, wear what you like.

  • Thank you.

  • By the way, Mother, I've invited the Hales.

  • Oh, I see.

  • Fanny, would you like me to invite

  • your dancing master and his wife to attend as well?

  • There is a marked difference between Mr Hale and a dancing master.

  • Is there?

  • How you can bother about some teacher of Greek at a time like this...

  • It's an indulgence, Mother.

  • I sweat enough. I think I deserve it.

  • You'll have to go, Margaret.

  • Your father cannot attend alone and I cannot manage it, I'm afraid.

  • I know, Mama, I know.

  • Thank you, Dixon.

  • What dress will you wear?

  • I've not thought about it.

  • You've had no new dresses this season, have you, child?

  • But there is the dress you wore for Edith's wedding.

  • Yes.

  • Dixon, go and find it for me, will you?

  • Ma'am.

  • What's wrong, Margaret? Can't you tell me what it is?

  • There are people in the town starving

  • and yet here am I to go to some sumptuous meal.

  • Well, you're doing it because of your father.

  • I'm so lost, Mama. So lost.

  • It'll need some airing.

  • Get the smell of lavender out. It's a bit overpowering.

  • But we didn't want any moths, did we, ma'am?

  • Hold it up against you, Margaret. Let me see.

  • Hmm. She'll be a picture, won't she, ma'am?

  • Yes, Margaret, you'll do.

  • Oh. O=1 h=2 .=15

  • Are you really going to dine at Thornton's, at MarIborough Mills?

  • Yes, Bessy.

  • But they visit with all the first folk in Milton.

  • Do you think we're not good enough to go?

  • Well, you see, they're thinking a deal of money there

  • and I reckon you've not got much.

  • No, that's very true. But it is not the first grand dinner I've been to, Bessy.

  • So what'll you wear, miss?

  • Pink silk, a gown I had for my cousin's wedding a year ago.

  • It is my very best.

  • That'll do.

  • (Coughs)

  • I shall be loathe to have