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  • North and South Part Three

  • Mr Thornton's called, miss.

  • - Mr Thornton? - He's in the sitting room.

  • Isn't Papa in?

  • He asked for you, miss, and the master's out.

  • Very well. I will go.

  • Mr Thornton?

  • My dear Miss Hale.

  • How are you?

  • - I am well, thank you. - But the wound you recelved?

  • You would obilge me, Mr Thornton, by not talking about it.

  • Yes, of course...

  • May I thank you for sending my mother the invalid mattress?

  • It gives her much ease.

  • We're always ready to help in any way we may.

  • Thank you. Mr Thornton, please tell me what has happened

  • as a result of yesterday's disturbances.

  • I've no news. I've not left the house.

  • I and my fellow magistrates agreed that charges should be preferred

  • solely against Boucher and two ringleaders who assisted him.

  • Miss Hale...

  • Do you not think it unjust, Mr Thornton,

  • that belng a magistrate you should exercise that authority

  • against those unfortunates who attacked you?

  • - Unfortunates, Miss Hale? - They are starving.

  • At the moment, maybe, but not for long. The strike's all but ended.

  • Ended?

  • Under threat of long prison sentences, almost every man is ready to swear

  • that he didn't take part in the riot, was against it, in fact.

  • Thelr one way of assuring us of thelr gulltlessness is by golng back to work,

  • on our terms.

  • And the Irish? What about the Irish?

  • Those who want to stay may do so.

  • The rest'll be pald handsomely and sent back again.

  • You have used those Irish to provoke the riot.

  • No, only to break the strike.

  • But is that not despicable?

  • Despicable?

  • My dear Miss Hale, I've used cunning, it's true.

  • But so have the workers in withdrawing thelr labour when most we needed it.

  • Cunning is right in commerce. Commerce depends upon it.

  • And what about humanity? You would have had those people starve to death.

  • But if they had, it would have been thelr own fault.

  • Miss Hale, you talk about the masters

  • as though they were some kind of ogres, jackals.

  • Don't you understand?

  • The master can go down to ruin as well as the men.

  • The master must run the race not only against the workers

  • but against all the other masters, his rivals.

  • I can be easily trampled underfoot by my fellows, see my family starve.

  • There is no mercy in our philosophy, nor should there be.

  • Add your humanity and the economic principles,

  • the sheer logic by which I must work, becomes meaningless.

  • We had better not talk about it.

  • No, no, you are... you are right.

  • For beyond the factory, beyond the worId of business...

  • ..there is another life.

  • I beg your pardon?

  • Miss Hale, I know how to be grateful, and the action you took yesterday...

  • You have nothing to be grateful for.

  • Any woman would have done the same.

  • I ought rather to apologise to you

  • for having sald thoughtless words which sent you down into danger.

  • Miss Hale, do not try to escape from the expression of my gratitude, please.

  • - It is from my heart. - I escape from nothing.

  • I simply say that you owe me no gratitude.

  • Any expression of it is palnful to me because I do not feel I deserve it.

  • I owe my life to you, Miss Hale, and I'm proud of knowing it.

  • Whatever the future, paln or pleasure, sorrow or joy, I owe to you.

  • You shall hear me.

  • I'm happy that I live, for I owe it all...

  • ..to a woman that I love.

  • I love you, Miss Hale,

  • as I do not think man ever loved woman before.

  • Mr Thornton, you offend me.

  • Offend you?

  • Indeed you do.

  • I belleve you imagine that my conduct of yesterday...

  • ..was a personal act between you and me.

  • There was nothing personal in my act,

  • and I find it extremely ungentlemanly of you to think that there was.

  • Very well, I'm not a gentleman.

  • But I clalm the right to express my feelings.

  • And I do not want to hear them. How dare you presume so!

  • Why, there was not a man in all that crowd for whom I had not more sympathy,

  • for whom I should not have done what little I could more heartliy.

  • Yes, I'm already aware

  • of these misplaced sympathles of yours, Miss Hale.

  • You despise me because you don't understand me.

  • I do not care to understand you.

  • No, I see you do not.

  • You are unfair and unjust.

  • One word more.

  • You look as though it talnted you to be loved by me.

  • You cannot avold it.

  • I've never loved any woman before,

  • but now I love, and I will love.

  • But don't be afraid of too much expression on my part.

  • I'm not afraid.

  • No one yet has ever dared to be impertinent to me,

  • and no one ever shall.

  • But, Mr Thornton...

  • You have been very kind to my father and mother.

  • Don't let us go on making each other angry.

  • Pray don't.

  • My children. My children.

  • Where are you?

  • Dixon, where are my children?

  • Miss Margaret's downstalrs, ma'am.

  • She's talking to Mr Thornton.

  • - And Frederick? - Frederick?

  • Tell my son I want to see him.

  • Dear madam, Frederick lives in Spaln.

  • Spaln? Why has he gone there?

  • He's lived there for the past elght years.

  • elght years?

  • Don't you remember, ma'am?

  • He's a wanted man.

  • His mother wants him.

  • Now, you have a daughter, a beautiful daughter.

  • Think of her.

  • Yes, Margaret. My daughter Margaret.

  • Dixon, will you get her for me?

  • - I want to talk to her. - Very well, ma'am.

  • - Dixon, will you get her, please? - Only calm, now. Calm.

  • Yes.

  • Oh, there you are, miss. Mr Thornton's gone, has he?

  • - Yes. - Why, you're trembilng, miss.

  • It's nothing. How is she?

  • Oh, Margaret. Margaret, dear.

  • Mama.

  • Dixon, will you leave us? I want to talk to my daughter alone.

  • Very well, ma'am.

  • Margaret, will you find him for me?

  • - Who? - Frederick.

  • - My brother? - Yes.

  • He'll make me well again. I must see him.

  • - Yes. - Will you get him for me?

  • Write to him. Write to him. Tell him that I want him by my side.

  • - He's my son. He should be here. - Mama, Mama, quletly, now.

  • Please, will you write to him? Write to him.

  • Mama, listen to me first.

  • Is there something you've not told me about Frederick?

  • Some secret concerning him?

  • Why do you say that?

  • I feel that there may be.

  • No.

  • He's a good boy, a wonderful boy. Write to him.

  • I will wait until Papa returns.

  • Oh, no, Margaret, now, by the next post, or I'll never see him again.

  • I'll get my pen and paper.

  • - I'll write to him myself. - No. No, Mama.

  • Lie still.

  • I shall sit here beside you and write to him.

  • You will?

  • Yes. You shall see me do it.

  • He's a good boy.

  • He's my son.

  • He should be here.

  • His place is here.

  • They're after me, the pollce. They're after me.

  • What do you expect?

  • There's nowhere to hide. Everybody's frightened of talking to me.

  • Not a man will hide me, no one.

  • - You're not stopping here, that's flat. - I'm not asking.

  • Only...would you... would you look in on me wife and kids sometime?

  • Aye, I can do that for you.

  • What's gonna happen to me, Nick?

  • How the hell do I know? You've got your true desserts now, you have.

  • For two pins I'd give you up to the pollce meself.

  • You'd what?

  • Committee sald no disorder, no injury to property or life.

  • You've ruined the strike, you have!

  • Instead of decent workers, you made us all into cowing revolutionarles!

  • We're all lumped together cos of you!

  • For two pins, I'd give you up meself. I would!

  • You an' all.

  • (Yells)

  • You an' all.

  • You'd not give him up?

  • Two pins I would.

  • There aln't much you can do for him, Bess.

  • Do what you can for his wife and kids... Here, Bess. Here...

  • Oh, God!

  • My little Bess.

  • My little Bess.

  • - Just arrived home, Papa? - Yes, my dear.

  • What have you been teaching today?

  • Use of the gerundive constructions in the accusative and dative.

  • Not one of my ablest pupils. Nothing sinks in.

  • Into one ear and out of the other.

  • Poor Papa.

  • To think how much I burn for my pupils to know the glories of Homer,

  • the sublimity of Virgil.

  • They can't understand the simplest of grammar.

  • Oh, well, it's my fate, I suppose.

  • Where have you been to, my pretty mald?

  • I've been to the post office, Papa, with a letter.

  • A letter to Frederick.

  • I've asked him to return home.

  • - You've... - Well, Mama wants him by her side.

  • And I know it's a long way for him to travel...

  • - Margaret... - What is it, Papa?

  • You don't know what you've done. How could you?

  • Papa... P=10 a=8 p=12 a=8 .=15 .=15 .=15

  • Your mother, was it she who suggested he should come home?

  • - Yes. - Oh, my poor wife.

  • - Her mind must be wandering. - Can't you explaln, Papa?

  • Yes, I must.

  • I must.

  • Sit down, Margaret.

  • Tell me, please.

  • We've protected you from knowing about your brother not because of his offence

  • but because of the legal consequences.

  • If he returns to England, he could be returning to his death.

  • What has he done?

  • - He led a mutiny while he was at sea. - A mutiny?

  • No, Margaret, let me try and explaln it to you calmly.

  • Frederick was a lieutenant under a certaln Captaln Reid,

  • a tyrant of a man who used his crew for his own amusement,

  • up and down the rigging like so many rats and monkeys.

  • One day some of the men were aloft on the spars of the maln topsail,

  • and this man, this devil,

  • ordered them to race down,

  • threatening the last of them with the cat-o'-nine-tails.

  • The man who was farthest from the mast

  • saw that it was impossible for him to pass his companions.

  • What could he do to escape that horrible, cruel flogging?

  • There was a rope hanging some ten feet beneath him.

  • He threw himself down in a desperate attempt to catch at it.

  • But he falled.

  • Oh, no.

  • And my brother led the mutiny?

  • Yes. There was a court martial.

  • Some of the sallors were hanged at the yardarm.

  • But for Frederick, the worst is that the court,

  • in condemning them to death,

  • sald they had suffered themselves to be led astray

  • by one of thelr superior officers.

  • I'm bringing him back into this danger.

  • But you did not know.

  • Besides, I'm glad.

  • Yes, now it has been done, I'm glad the letter has been posted.

  • Glad?

  • I would not have done it myself, but I'm thankful that it is as it is.

  • Frederick would never have forgiven me for keeping him from his mother

  • in her final hours.

  • Shall I serve luncheon now, sir?

  • Thank you, Dixon.

  • The risk he will have to take.

  • Yes, yes, Frederick must be kept hidden.

  • We'll have Dixon guard the door ilke a dragon.

  • But, Margaret, whatever the risk,

  • the right thing has been done.

  • I know my son. He's an honourable man.

  • I know what he would wish sald of him at a time like this.

  • (Speaks Latin)

  • One of the odes of Horace, my dear.

  • He has set honour before the safe and the sensible.

  • Well? W=38 e=7 I=26 I=26 ?=44