Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Hi. My name is Rebecca from engvid.com. Nowadays, it's very common to talk about extreme things.

  • We hear about extreme fitness, extreme sports, extreme weather.

  • Well, today's lesson is about extreme English. What do I mean by extreme English?

  • Well, often, in informal conversation, people use a lot of exaggerated expressions to express their feelings,

  • and that's what we're going to learn here.

  • You should try your best not to use this in formal situations because it's really not meant for that.

  • But you will hear a lot of people using it in regular conversation. So, let's have a look at some examples.

  • So, the examples that I have on the board show you verbs which can be exaggerated,

  • adjectives that can be exaggerated, and adverbs. Okay?

  • Let's look at some example. So, for example, let's say you're hungry.

  • Right? So, instead of just saying: "I'm really hungry." People tend to say: "Oh my god. I'm starving."

  • Now, does it mean they're actually starving? No. Of course not. Not the person who's saying that.

  • The person who's probably actually starving doesn't have the strength to say they're starving,

  • but... So, we say: "I'm starving. Let's get something to eat."

  • Or, if it's really cold and you say: "I'm freezing." Okay?

  • Instead of just saying: "I'm really cold", "I'm freezing." Okay? This is the extreme part of it.

  • Or: "My shoes are killing me." Of course you're not going to die.

  • It's just a way of speaking. "My shoes are hurting." Right? Okay. All right.

  • Adjectives, let's see how we can use extreme English when it comes to adjectives.

  • "Oh my god. There's a gigantic spider on my bed." It's probably not a gigantic spider,

  • but it's a large spider as far as you're concerned. So, that's where the exaggeration takes place.

  • Or: "I have a million emails to answer." Probably not a million, but we mean a lot of emails.

  • Adverbs. "I'm totally exhausted today." It would have been enough to say that you're exhausted,

  • because after that, it's kind of repetitive or redundant. But sometimes people add that just to exaggerate it.

  • Or: "She's absolutely gorgeous." Or: "He's absolutely gorgeous."

  • Right? So, that's how we can have the extreme part of it, the exaggeration.

  • We often apply this also to certain areas, such as when we're talking about numbers, or amounts, or time, or space.

  • For example: "There were 100's of people in line outside the store."

  • Now, it's extreme or exaggerated only if there weren't actually hundreds, just meant a lot.

  • But you say hundreds because hundreds represents a lot.

  • Or: "I have thousands of things to do before I leave next week." Okay? Again, you probably don't have thousands of things,

  • but you've got a lot of things to do.

  • Amounts. "Oh, we've got tons of homework." We don't have tons of homework.

  • We've got a lot of homework. Or: "There were piles of paper everywhere." Okay? Exaggeration again.

  • Sometimes when we exaggerate time, we can exaggerate it in two directions.

  • We can make it shorter than it actually is, or we can make it longer than it actually is.

  • For example: "Could I talk to you for a minute? I know you're busy. It'll just take 5 seconds."

  • Now, isn't that an exaggeration? It is, because it's gonna to take you more than five seconds,

  • but you're exaggerating it in another way, you're shrinking it. Right?

  • Or: "Oh my god. I met my friend. I haven't seen her in years." Okay? Maybe it's true, but it could be an exaggeration.

  • Or, you could say: "In ages", that's another expression where you exaggerate the amount of time. Right?

  • Or: "Oh my god. I can't live here. This is such a tiny closet." Okay? "I need a big closet."

  • All right. It's probably not tiny, but in your view, from your perspective, it's tiny.

  • Or: "This is a huge bedroom." Okay? Again, these are relative terms, but we're also exaggerating it to express our emotions,

  • as well as our... the objective reality. Okay?

  • Again, the objective reality was not a gigantic spider, just a large one; and not a tiny closet, but just a small one.

  • Okay? But by using this kind of extreme English, you'll sound a little bit

  • more like a native speaker when you're speaking in informal situations. Okay?

  • If you'd like to do a little quiz on this to master it, please go to our website: www.engvid.com.

  • Thanks very much for watching. Good luck with your English. Bye for now.

Hi. My name is Rebecca from engvid.com. Nowadays, it's very common to talk about extreme things.

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級

エクストリームイングリッシュ! (Extreme English!)

  • 22586 2671
    Gisele Sung に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語