Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Where you end up in life is often the result

    人生の行き着く先は結果であることが多い

  • of a number of seemingly innocent choices,

    一見何の罪もないように見えるいくつかの選択肢の中から

  • each appearing insignificant at the time,

    その時はさしたることがないように見えた。

  • but all leading you in a single direction.

    しかし、すべてはあなたを一つの方向に導いています。

  • By 18, I had chosen to use drugs to cope with my life,

    18歳までには、自分の生活に対処するために薬物を使うことを選択していました。

  • and chosen to associate with people

    人と付き合うことを選んだ

  • who didn't care about my well-being or that of others.

    私の幸福や他の人の幸福を気にしていない人。

  • In doing so, I had chosen to put myself into high-risk situations.

    そうすることで、私はリスクの高い状況に身を置くことを選択していました。

  • (Sigh)

    (ため息)

  • When I was 18, my mother died.

    私が18歳の時、母が亡くなりました。

  • Three days later, I chose to meet with a drug dealer.

    3日後、私は麻薬の売人と会うことを選んだ。

  • What I didn't know, when I chose to meet with this guy,

    私が知らなかったこと、この人との出会いを選んだ時に。

  • was that he had an interest in adolescent boys and sex acts.

    は、思春期の少年や性行為に興味を持っていたということでした。

  • What he didn't know, when he chose to meet with me,

    彼が知らなかったこと、彼が私と会うことを選んだとき。

  • was that I was someone who was prepared to fight.

    は、戦う覚悟のある人間だったということです。

  • What neither of us knew, when we made our respective choices,

    私たちがそれぞれの選択をしたとき、私たちのどちらも知らなかったこと。

  • is where they would lead us.

    彼らは私たちを導くだろう

  • Before the day was out, he would be dead,

    その日のうちに死んでしまう。

  • and I would be spending the first night,

    と私は最初の夜を過ごすことになりました。

  • of what would be the next 10 years, behind bars.

    次の10年は刑務所の中だ

  • By 20, I had graduated to New Zealand's toughest maximum-security prison.

    20歳までに、私はニュージーランドで最も過酷な最高刑期の刑務所を卒業していました。

  • It's here that I learned the theory of how to hide

    隠れる方法の理論を学んだのは、ここからでした。

  • from heat sensors and police helicopters,

    熱センサーや警察ヘリから

  • and the reality of how to make a weapon

    と武器の作り方の実態

  • out of glad wrap and a toothbrush.

    嬉しいラップと歯ブラシを外して

  • What I didn't realize before I was imprisoned,

    投獄される前に気づかなかったこと。

  • was that I was already living in a prison of my own making.

    私はすでに自分で作った牢獄の中で生活していました。

  • The prison in my mind.

    私の心の中の牢獄。

  • There are many beliefs that imprison us,

    私たちを幽閉する信念はたくさんあります。

  • and stop us experiencing the fullness of life.

    そして、私たちが人生の充実感を体験するのを止めてしまうのです。

  • My prison was my belief that my potential was fixed.

    私の刑務所は、私の可能性が固定されていると信じていました。

  • My prison was my belief that the measure of a man

    私の牢獄は、人の尺度が人の尺度であると信じていた。

  • was his capacity for violence,

    彼の暴力能力の高さがそうさせた

  • and that men shouldn't feel scared, sad, vulnerable, or weak.

    そして、男性は怖くて、悲しくて、弱くて、弱いと感じるべきではないと。

  • It is ironic that I had to be in an actual prison

    実際の刑務所にいなければならなかったというのは皮肉なもので

  • in order to break out of my mental prison.

    精神的な刑務所から抜け出すために

  • It is also ironic that it wasn't until I was released

    私が解放されるまで、それがなかったというのも皮肉なことです。

  • that I realized how many other people

    他にもたくさんの人がいることに気づいて

  • are trapped in their own personal prisons.

    は個人の牢獄に閉じ込められています。

  • I was able to escape my mental prison

    精神的な牢獄から抜け出すことができました

  • through five progressive steps to personal change.

    個人的な変化のための5つの進歩的なステップを通して。

  • I call these "the five steps to freedom".

    私はこれらの"自由への5つのステップを呼び出します。

  • The first step to freedom

    自由への第一歩

  • is to recognize that we are born free.

    は、私たちが自由に生まれてきたことを認識することです。

  • As babies, we take our first breaths with a clean slate.

    赤ちゃんのように、私たちは清潔な状態で最初の呼吸をします。

  • But then life kicks in,

    しかし、人生が始まった。

  • and in an attempt to cope with our experiences

    経験に対処しようとすると

  • and make sense of our worlds,

    そして、私たちの世界を理解する。

  • we acquire self-defeating and distorted beliefs.

    私たちは、自虐的で歪んだ信念を身につけます。

  • Over time, these beliefs imprison us.

    時間が経つにつれて、これらの信念は私たちを投獄します。

  • Yet this is not the life we were born to live,

    しかし、これは私たちが生きるために生まれてきた人生ではありません。

  • the life where we are truly authentic and free.

    私たちが本当に本物であり、自由である人生。

  • It took a meeting with one of New Zealand's most accomplished safe crackers

    それは、ニュージーランドの最も熟練した安全なクラッカーの一人との会議を取った。

  • to challenge my idea of my freedom.

    自分の自由という考えに挑戦するために

  • It was about 2 years into my sentence,

    文章にして約2年。

  • and just after I'd finished another period in solitary confinement.

    独房での別の期間を終えた直後にね

  • Now this guy was a MENSA member.

    今のこの人はMENSAのメンバーだったんですね。

  • He was smart,

    彼は頭が良かった

  • and we used to spend a lot of time in the yard,

    と、よく庭で過ごしていました。

  • discussing the intricacies of his trade.

    彼の取引の複雑さについて話し合っています。

  • The yard is like an empty swimming pool,

    庭は空っぽのプールのようになっています。

  • where every end's the deep end.

    深いところでは、すべての終わりが深いところです。

  • I remember as I'd watch a plane fly overhead,

    飛行機が頭上を飛ぶのを見ながら覚えています。

  • how I so would have given anything to be in that plane, --

    あの飛行機に乗るためなら 何でもしてあげたいと思っていた...

  • (Voice cracks) -- wherever it was going, to be anywhere but here.

    (声が割れる) -- それがどこへ行こうとしていたのか、ここ以外のどこへ行こうとしていたのか。

  • One day the safecracker approached me

    ある日、金庫破りが近づいてきた。

  • with a tennis ball and a heavy ashtray.

    テニスボールと重い灰皿を持って

  • And asked me:

    と私に尋ねた。

  • if he was to drop these at the same time,

    もし彼がこれらを同時に落としていたら

  • which would hit the ground first?

    どっちが先に着地するか

  • I couldn't believe the stupidity of such a question.

    そんな質問のバカさ加減が信じられませんでした。

  • (Simultaneous thud)

    (同時ゴツン)

  • Watching those two objects hit the ground at the same time,

    その2つの物体が同時に地面にぶつかるのを見て

  • blew my mind.

    心に響いた。

  • I had never questioned my understanding of the world.

    自分の理解を疑ったことはありませんでした。

  • I had always just assumed that the world was the way it appeared to me.

    私は今まで、世界が自分に見えているものだと思い込んでいただけでした。

  • Yet this demonstration made me wonder

    しかし、このデモンストレーションを見て、私は疑問に思いました。

  • what else I thought I knew

    他に知っていると思っていたこと

  • that I could be wrong about.

    私が間違っていたかもしれない

  • Prior to this,

    その前に

  • I'd always seen education as something that you did to get a job.

    私はいつも、教育は仕事を得るためにするものだと思っていました。

  • Now I started to see education as something

    今、私は教育を何かとして見るようになりました。

  • that could make the world a more interesting place,

    その方が世界が面白くなるかもしれません。

  • and something that could increase the accuracy of my beliefs.

    と、自分の信念の精度を高めるようなものを。

  • And I had always been one of those insufferable people

    そして、私はいつもそのような不機嫌な人の一人だった。

  • who likes to think they're right about everything,

    何でもかんでも自分が正しいと思いたがる人。

  • a tendency that had prompted my Mum to put a note on the fridge

    お袋が冷蔵庫にメモを貼るようになっていた傾向

  • suggesting that teenagers should leave home

    出家勧告

  • while they still know everything!

    彼らはまだすべてを知っている間に

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Recognizing that we are born free,

    私たちは自由に生まれてきたことを認識すること。

  • and that the beliefs that imprison us

    そして、私たちを幽閉する信念は

  • can be challenged and replaced

    挑戦して置き換えることができます

  • is the first step to freedom.

    が自由への第一歩です。

  • The second step to freedom

    自由への第二段階

  • is choosing to break out of our prisons.

    刑務所からの脱却を選択している

  • Living in a prison is tough,

    刑務所での生活は大変です。

  • but breaking out of prison is harder.

    でも脱獄の方が難しい

  • The desire to break out

    脱却したいという気持ち

  • is driven by how likely we think we are to succeed.

    は、私たちが成功する可能性がどれだけ高いと思うかによって駆動されます。

  • Many people choose not to break out of their prisons,

    多くの人が刑務所から脱獄しないことを選択しています。

  • because they think that change is impossible,

    変化は不可能だと思っているからです。

  • and they see disappointment as inevitable.

    そして、彼らは失望は避けられないと考えている。

  • Breaking out also depends on how much effort we think it will take,

    脱獄も、どれだけの努力が必要だと思うかにかかっています。

  • and how much value we place on such change.

    そして、そのような変化にどれだけの価値を置いているか。

  • It is much safer to be inside.

    中にいる方がはるかに安全です。

  • We do not risk additional failure,

    追加の故障のリスクはありません。

  • and it requires less effort.

    と、より少ない労力で済むようになります。

  • Recidivism rates support this point.

    再犯率はこの点を支持している。

  • For many people, it is easier to be in prison.

    多くの人にとっては、刑務所に入っている方が楽なのです。

  • You have so few adult responsibilities on the inside.

    内面の大人の責任が少なすぎだろ

  • And as twisted as it sounds,

    そして、それが聞こえるようにひねくれている。

  • many people find a sense of belonging,

    多くの人が帰属意識を見出しています。

  • status and community

    地位と地域社会

  • within prison that they don't get in the outside world.

    刑務所の中では、外の世界では手に入らないものを手に入れることができます。

  • Everyone knows their place in the prison hierarchy,

    誰もが刑務所の中で自分の立場を知っている。

  • and for some people, that place provides their only sense of worth.

    人によっては、その場所が唯一の価値観となります。

  • Breaking out requires real emotional commitment to change.

    ブレイクスルーには、変化するための本当の感情的なコミットメントが必要です。

  • And to get that commitment,

    そして、そのコミットメントを得るために。

  • you need to focus on why you would want to change,

    なぜ変えたいと思うのかに焦点を当てる必要があります。

  • not why others might think you should change,

    他の人があなたが変わるべきだと思う理由ではなく、あなたが変わるべきだと思う理由です。

  • but why you would want to change for yourself.

    しかし、なぜ自分のために変わろうとするのか。

  • I had never considered myself someone who could achieve academically.

    私は自分のことを学力的に達成できる人間だと思ったことはありませんでした。

  • I'd even been held back a year at school.

    学校では1年も待たされたこともあった。

  • Yet I enrolled in those first two psychology papers,

    でも私は最初の2つの心理学の論文を読んだの

  • because I knew that understanding what makes people tick

    人の心を動かすものを理解することで

  • is a useful skill to have in prison.

    刑務所の中では便利なスキルです。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Anywhere from 50 to 80% of people in prison

    刑務所に入っている人の50~80%の人が

  • suffer some form of mental health issue,

    何らかの形で精神衛生上の問題を抱えている。

  • and being attacked due to the mental instability of others

    刺されて刺されて

  • was a real concern.

    は本当に気になっていました。

  • I completed my first assignment in solitary confinement.

    最初の課題である孤独な監禁を終えました。

  • I printed it all as one paragraph, all in capital letters.

    全部大文字で一段落として印刷しました。

  • I did this because I was ignorant of writing conventions,

    書き方の慣例に無知だったからやったんだよ。

  • and I thought capitals looked neater.

    資本金の方がすっきりしてると思ったんだが

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I completed my exams in a windowless room in a punishment block.

    罰ブロックで窓のない部屋で試験を終えました。

  • Yet I still somehow managed to pass my papers.

    それでも何とか書類には合格しました。

  • I was so amazed to pass these exams.

    この試験に合格してびっくりしました。

  • It made me wonder if maybe I wasn't capable of more

    それは、私は多分私はもっと多くのことをすることができなかったのではないかと考えさせられました。

  • than I had previously thought possible.

    今まで考えていたよりも

  • It made me dream. It made the think:

    夢を見させてくれた。考えさせられました。

  • "Imagine, imagine if I could get out of here with a degree!"

    "想像してみてください、想像してみてください、私は学位を持ってここから出ることができた場合! &quot.

  • Going for a degree seemed like such an audacious goal.

    学位を取るというのは、とても大胆な目標のように思えました。

  • And a major obstacle to achieving this dream,

    そして、この夢を達成するための大きな障害となるのが

  • was the amount of marijuana I was smoking.

    は私が吸っていた大麻の量でした。

  • (Laughing)

    (笑)

  • Smoking weed allowed me to enjoy the moment,

    葉っぱを吸うことで、その瞬間を楽しむことができました。

  • and avoid the reality of my situation.

    と、自分の置かれている状況の現実を回避する。

  • I was young and locked up.

    若くて監禁されていました。

  • I was frustrated, I had no sense of direction.

    イライラして方向性が定まらなかった。

  • If I was going to start the process of really changing my life,

    本当に自分の人生を変えるためのプロセスを始めようと思っていたら

  • I needed to stop doing drugs.

    薬物をやめる必要があった

  • Passing those exams had reinforced my desire to break out of my prison.

    試験に合格したことで、刑務所を脱獄したいという気持ちが強くなりました。

  • But wanting change, and turning that change into action,

    しかし、変化を求め、その変化を行動に移す。

  • are two very different things.

    とは全く別のものです。

  • The third step to freedom is to make the escape.

    自由への第三のステップは、脱出することです。

  • Dreams without action remain dreams.

    行動のない夢は夢のままです。

  • In order to make the escape, you need to start taking steps

    脱出するためには、まず一歩を踏み出す必要があります。

  • that reduce the distance between where you are

    自分がいる場所との距離を縮める

  • and where you desire to be.

    と、あなたが望む場所に

  • People that want to break out of their prisons,

    刑務所から脱却したい人たち。

  • but fail to do so, often think about change

    仝仝仝仝仝仝仝仝仝々仝仝仝々仝々仝々

  • as something that occurs in some distant future.

    として

  • The problem with us is that it doesn't prompt you to act,

    私たちの問題は、それが行動を促さないことです。

  • and change can start to feel like it's beyond your reach.

    と変化は、それがあなたの手の届かないところにあるように感じ始めることができます。

  • It's tomorrow, next month, next year.

    明日、来月、来年です。

  • To make your escape, you must get specific about what you want to change.

    逃げ切るためには、何を変えたいのかを具体的にしなければなりません。

  • Specific change is not wanting to lose weight,

    具体的な変化は、痩せたくないということです。

  • but wanting to lose 5 kilos.

    でも5キロ痩せたい。

  • Having the general idea that you want to write a book,

    本を書きたいという一般的な考えを持つこと。

  • will not get you to put pen to paper.

    紙にペンを書くことはできません。

  • Having the specific goal

    具体的な目標を持つこと

  • to write 500 words on Thursday just might.

    木曜日に500ワードを書くためにちょうどかもしれません。

  • The research shows that having vague goals

    漠然とした目標を持つことは

  • makes it hard to start and easy to give up.

    始めるのが大変で諦めがつきやすい

  • Specific goals mean that you can't fool yourself into thinking

    具体的な目標とは、自分の考えを誤魔化すことができないということです。

  • you have done enough.

    あなたは十分にやった

  • Many people in prison talk about what they will do when they are released,

    刑務所の中では、出所したらどうするかという話をする人が多いです。

  • how they will take better care of their kids,

    どうやって子供の面倒を見るのか?

  • how they will lead better lives.

    どのようにしてより良い人生を歩んでいくのか。

  • But life and change, are about what you do right now.

    しかし、人生と変化は、あなたが今何をしているかということです。

  • Time is a different commodity when you're serving a long period of imprisonment.

    あなたが長い期間服役しているときに時間は別の商品です。

  • To survive psychologically, you need to forget about the outside world,

    心理的に生き残るためには、外の世界のことを忘れる必要があります。

  • accept this is your new life,

    これがあなたの新しい人生だと受け入れてください。

  • and to focus on the present.

    と現在に集中すること。

  • Focusing on the present was key for making my escape.

    今に集中することが逃げ道を作る鍵となりました。

  • I didn't worry about what I was,

    自分が何であるかは気にしていませんでした。

  • or wasn't going to do in some uncertain future.

    とか、不確実な未来にやるつもりはなかったのかもしれません。

  • I just focused on what I could do today.

    今日は自分ができることだけに集中していました。

  • On what I could do right now.

    今の自分にできることについて

  • Research shows that this ability to seize the moment

    研究によると、この瞬間をつかむ能力は

  • makes you 3 times more likely to achieve your goals.

    目標を達成する確率が3倍になります。

  • So, I stopped smoking weed,

    だから、大麻を吸うのをやめました。

  • which allowed me to complete my undergraduate degree.

    そのおかげで学部の学位を取得することができました。

  • It also massively reduced the amount of time I spent in solitary confinement.

    独房にいた時間も大幅に短縮されました。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • For me, the specific and related goals,

    私にとっては、具体的な目標とそれに関連した目標。

  • were to become drug free, and to complete my degree.

    薬物を使わないようになることと、学位を取得することでした。

  • The cost of making my escape was sacrificing being emotionally numbed.

    私の逃避行の代償は、感情的に麻痺していることを犠牲にすることでした。

  • But making my escape didn't come without a struggle.

    しかし、私の脱出には苦労はつきものだ。

  • The fourth step to freedom is to fight for your freedom.

    自由への第四のステップは、自分の自由のために戦うことです。

  • Fighting for your freedom requires grit and tenacity.

    自由のために戦うには、勇気と粘り強さが必要です。

  • To achieve your goals, you must overcome any obstacles you encounter.

    目標を達成するためには、遭遇したあらゆる障害を克服しなければなりません。

  • Giving up drugs was not a straightforward process,

    薬を手放すことは一筋縄ではいかなかった。

  • there were certainly relapses.

    確かに再発はあった

  • And studying within prison had its own set of obstacles,

    そして、刑務所内での勉強は、それ自体が障害となっていました。

  • such as getting permission to access course related materials.

    講座関連の資料へのアクセス許可を得るなど。

  • Yet overcoming such obstacles,

    しかし、そのような障害を克服すること。

  • is exactly what fighting for your freedom is about.

    自由のために戦うというのは、まさにそのことです。

  • In fact, it is through overcoming such obstacles,

    実際には、そのような障害を克服することである。

  • that we develop our capacity for change,

    私たちが変化するための能力を開発すること。

  • and the will power required to make it happen.

    と、それを実現するために必要な意志力。

  • Many people think that will power and self-discipline

    多くの人が思うのは、意志の力と自制心

  • are things that you either have or you don't have.

    は、あなたが持っているか、持っていないかのどちらかである。

  • But the research shows that these are characteristics

    しかし、研究によると、これらの特徴は

  • developed through practice and application.

    実践と応用で開発された

  • By the time I completed my undergraduate degree,

    学部を卒業する頃には

  • I had developed enough tenacity

    私は十分な粘り強さを身につけていた

  • to fight for entry into a postgraduate program in psychology.

    心理学の大学院への入学を目指して戦うために。

  • I then fought to have my honors research project

    私はその後、私の優等生研究プロジェクトのために戦いました。

  • upgraded to a Master's Thesis.

    修士論文に格上げされました。

  • This left me with a number of papers that needed to be completed

    これで、完成させなければならない書類がいくつも残ってしまった。

  • and that required attending classes.

    と授業に出席する必要がありました。

  • I was still securely absent from classes at this point.

    この時点ではまだ確実に欠席していました。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • But I was able to complete these papers because those teaching them

    しかし、これらの論文を完成させることができたのは、それを教えている人たちのおかげです。

  • allowed me to enroll as a special distance student,

    特待生として入学することができました。

  • in addition to their normal workloads.

    通常の作業量に加えて

  • At various stages in my journey, I encountered obstacles

    旅の様々な段階で、私は障害物に遭遇しました。

  • that required persistence and commitment to overcome.

    克服するための粘り強さとコミットメントを必要とする

  • Yet my dreams increased in proportion to my successes.

    しかし、私の夢は成功に比例して増えていきました。

  • Once I had completed my Masters,

    修士課程を修了したら

  • a Doctorate seemed like the next logical step.

    博士号を取得することは、次の論理的なステップのように思えました。

  • This time the barrier was even bigger.

    今回のバリアはさらに大きくなっていました。

  • I was told it would be impossible to start a Doctorate,

    博士号を取るのは無理だと言われました。

  • without regular face-to-face meetings with my supervisors.

    上司との定期的な面談がなければ

  • So, my supervisors traveled hours out of their way

    上司は何時間もかけて来てくれた

  • to visit me in prison.

    牢屋の中で私を見舞うために

  • Fighting for your freedom is crucial to successful change and growth.

    あなたの自由のために戦うことは、成功した変化と成長のために非常に重要です。

  • Yet the fights best won are those with allies.

    しかし、戦いに勝つには味方が必要です。

  • If I didn't have a father who was prepared to visit me

    私には、私を訪問する準備をしていた父親がいなかったら

  • every weekend for 10 years,

    10年間、毎週末に

  • if I didn't have mentors, such as John Barlow

    ジョン・バーロウのような指導者がいなかったら

  • and Doctor Paul Englert who were prepared to challenge me,

    と、覚悟を決めて挑んでくれたポール・エングラート博士。

  • and to encourage me to dream bigger,

    そして、より大きな夢を見るように私を励ましてくれました。