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  • Trilling and singing. This is for a TThan Lann from Vietnam who said, "Please don't

  • sing anymore." I just did. Sing, sing, sing. Hi, Tthan. Anyways. Sorry. I don't want to

  • lose this opportunity with you guys. I was lucky; I didn't miss this movie by Chris Evans.

  • Captain America. Great film. Great film. Yeah. I want to do a lesson with you today about

  • "miss" and "loss".

  • You noticed I used two examples when I said, "I don't want to lose time with you", and

  • "I don't want to miss -- or I didn't miss movie." Why? Because many students make a

  • common mistake of using "miss" and "loss". They might say something like, "I lose my

  • bus today. That is why I'm late." I can't understand why they would say that because

  • in English, "miss" and "loss" mean something similar. It means -- Hey, Mr. E. How are you

  • -- you don't have something. Right? You don't have something. But they come at it from different

  • angles. When I lose something, it means I have less. See? I have less of it, or there's

  • a reduce. Okay? But when I miss something, I don't hit, or I don't connect. The target

  • is here -- "target" is where you're aiming or what you want to hit -- but we move, or

  • we miss, so we do not hit the target. We should go here, but we go here. "You miss." Okay?

  • So there's not a hitting or a connection. So that's the basic lesson we're going to

  • do today. Loss -- oh, sorry. "Lose" and "miss", what are the differences? How are they the

  • same? So you can speak like a native speaker. Are you ready? Let's go to the board.

  • All right. Now, I've talked about basically what they mean. "Miss" means to not hit something,

  • right? Or not make a connection to something. Well, when you lose something, it means you

  • can't find it, it's missing, or there's a reduction. But there's another difference

  • as well. Let's talk about the grammar. We use them differently grammatically. And we're

  • going to work on this now. "Lose." "Lose" is an irregular verb. What that means is it

  • doesn't follow the standard order or the usual way we do things. Add an S -- right? "Lose,

  • loses" -- to the present tense -- ING or ED. It's an irregular verb. So when we talk about

  • the past -- okay? So "lose", the base form, lose is -- oops. Sorry. Before I lose my mind.

  • I think I lost my mind here. "Lose" is as in, "He loses everything." "Lose" -- base

  • form. "Losing" -- when you're in the middle of; present continuous. But the past form

  • is "lost". We change it. It makes it irregular. Okay?

  • Now, that's the verb form when we use it -- the action. But when we talk about noun, we change

  • this word "lose" to "loss". Okay? Notice the E becomes an S. They're similar in that something

  • you cannot find or do not have anymore. Here's an example of using "loss". "His death was

  • a loss to the company." Notice we use an article to tell you this is a noun. Okay? And he is

  • no longer here. Remember, I said there's a reduction or less of something? So that's

  • what we have with "loss" when we use it as a noun. Now, we're going to go over to "miss",

  • and we're going to look at the grammar for that.

  • Mr. E is a little confused, but should be finished by now. Okay?

  • Ready? "Miss" -- it's a regular verb. So "miss", "misses" -- right? So you've got "misses",

  • m-i-s-s-e-s, like "Mississippi", double S here, right? "Missing" and "missed". No problem

  • there. As a noun, unlike "lose", it keeps the same form. So it can be a bit confusing

  • for people because they say "miss" and "miss", and they think, "Oh, noun or verb?" Well,

  • actually, it's easy. We go here. "The new TV program will be a hit or miss." Once again,

  • we've got an article to tell us, so you don't have to worry, really. You just look for the

  • article with this. It's a noun. Or verb; miss watching or miss going, or miss the -- the

  • usual verb endings, and you know it's a verb. Cool? All right.

  • So we're going to take a second. And magically, I'm going to come back. What's going to happen

  • is we're going to look at the combined differences between "miss" and "loss", and I'm going to

  • clear up that confusion. Ready?

  • Hey. Did you miss me? I'm back. All right. So the board is changed, and we have to continue

  • our lesson. So we talked about not making a connection when we talked about missing.

  • And then, with "loss", we talked about reduction. Right? So let's go to the board over here.

  • We've got our "lost" over here -- okay? Oh, sorry. "Lose." And we've got over here -- what

  • do we have? We have "miss". Okay?

  • So let's talk about differences and similarities. I said before, why they're similar, and why

  • students make the mistake is something is not there, or you don't have something. But

  • I love the word "similar" because it tells me something different, and I need to know

  • that. We noticed in grammar, there's a difference in how they are formed. One's an irregular

  • verb; one's a regular verb. Which one is the regular verb? "Miss." And we also notice that

  • with "miss", you keep the same form for the noun as well as the verb. But when we do "lose",

  • we have to change it to -- what do we change it to? "Loss." Right? Cool.

  • Now, let's look at how we use it a little differently. So we're going to start off with

  • "lose" because I don't want to lose you right now, right? That means reduce your attention

  • on me. Right. So "lose". "Lost" is the past tense, right? In Canada or America and England

  • for that matter, when you don't have your keys -- you don't know where they are. You

  • had them somewhere, but they're gone -- you're going to say, "I lost my keys." You can go

  • to the "lost and found". And if they -- you know, you ask nicely, maybe they have them.

  • We use, in this case, "lose" or "lost" for keys, your phone -- look at the iTalk. I don't

  • want to get sued by Apple. It's an iPhone. It's cheap. I'm poor. Anyway. So it's iTalk.

  • You listen. Okay? iPhone. You lose these things. These are things you can lose. You can lose

  • a book. You can lose your mind and go crazy. Okay?

  • Now, the other thing you can lose, which is different, is a game. So when we talk about

  • games, if you like football or soccer or hockey or baseball, you can lose the game, which

  • means not win. A lot of in times, people know "win" -- "We win! We win!" -- they don't understand

  • "lose". Now, we had somebody who did a really great lesson on "lose and loser". Ronnie.

  • You should go check her out. She's got "lose, loser," and all that. It's a really good video.

  • Anyway. You can also -- hey, you can lose your job. It's not that your job is disappearing

  • and you don't know where it is. "I lose my job. I don't know where I leave it. I go find

  • job." No. What it means is you're fired. The company asks you to leave. And like a game,

  • it's gone from you now. You don't have it anymore. Good?

  • Let's look at "miss". "Miss." We said you don't have something, but the ways that you

  • don't have something are a little bit different. In this case, "miss". We can miss something

  • like information. Maybe you say something, and I'm working. "Sorry. I missed that. What

  • did you say?" It means I did not see or hear what you said. I did not lose it because to

  • lose it means, "I had it, and I don't know where it is anymore." "I missed it", as in

  • "I did not -- it did not hit my ear or my eye." When you say, "Hey. Did you see that

  • guy over there?" And I go, "No. I missed him. Who was he?" You know, it's Mr. E and James

  • coming live. Right? No. Or "did you hear what I was saying?" "No. Sorry. I missed that.

  • I was watching the television." Meaning I did not get the information. So "miss", in

  • this case, means to not receive or get information. It doesn't hit you. There's no aim.

  • Now, what about "miss" for transportation? This is one I hear students make many mistakes

  • on because they always -- not "always". Bad word. They generally will say, "I lose the

  • bus; I lose the plane." My response or what I usually say to them is, "How do you lose

  • a 13 billion-dollar aircraft? It's this big. How can you lose it? Do you need glasses?"

  • Because what they mean is, "I did not connect." Remember? "Miss" means "connect". Did not

  • connect. "I did not connect with the train -- which means "to join" -- or the airplane."

  • So we generally use it for transportation. So when you miss something, you have to listen

  • for context or how, what, why, and when they're saying it. "Did I miss what you said? I'm

  • sorry, I missed that. Can you repeat it?" That one was for information. Or I could say,

  • "Hey. Sorry I'm late. I missed the bus." I did not miss information, I missed transportation.

  • Okay?

  • So a quick summary is, "lose" and "miss". When you don't have something because it's

  • been reduced or you do not make contact or you did not hit what you're looking for, that's

  • when they have the same kind of meaning. Right? Don't have something. How they differ, or

  • how they're different, is "losing" is when we basically lose things -- keys and phones,

  • and we don't have them anymore. But "losing" could also mean your job or a game. Or you

  • can lose your life. Yikes. Right? It's gone. You don't have it anymore. You're dead. "Missing

  • something" is to miss information. You don't hit what you're looking for. So the information

  • was there; you didn't quite catch it.

Trilling and singing. This is for a TThan Lann from Vietnam who said, "Please don't

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A2 初級

紛らわしい言葉。MISSかLOSEか? (Confusing Words: MISS or LOSE?)

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    Ashley Chen に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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