Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

審査済み この字幕は審査済みです
  • When I was in my 20s,

    20代の時

  • I saw my very first psychotherapy client.

    私は心理医療で初めて患者を診察しました。

  • I was a Ph.D. student in clinical psychology at Berkeley.

    当時私はBerkeleyで臨床心理学を学ぶ博士課程の学生でした。

  • She was a 26-year-old woman named Alex.

    彼女はAlexという26歳の女性でした。

  • Now Alex walked into her first session

    初診の時、彼女は

  • wearing jeans and a big slouchy top,

    ジーンズとダボダボのシャツを着て、

  • and she dropped onto the couch in my office

    私のオフィスにあるソファーに腰掛け、

  • and kicked off her flats

    フラットシューズを脱ぎ

  • and told me she was there to talk about guy problems.

    ここにきたのは男の子について相談したいからだと言いました。

  • Now when I heard this, I was so relieved.

    そのことを聞いた時、私はとてもほっとしました。

  • My classmate got an arsonist for her first client.

    クラスメイトの初診患者は放火魔だったからです。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑い声)

  • And I got a twentysomething who wanted to talk about boys.

    それに比べ、私の患者は20代の女の子で、男の子について相談したいというものでした。

  • This I thought I could handle.

    それなら、私でも解決できると思いました。

  • But I didn't handle it.

    しかし、そんなに甘くはなかったのです。

  • With the funny stories that Alex would bring to session,

    Alexが診察中にする話はとても面白く、

  • it was easy for me just to nod my head

    私はただ頷くだけでよかったのでした。

  • while we kicked the can down the road.

    そして、問題を先送りにしていました。

  • "Thirty's the new 20," Alex would say,

    「30歳は20歳をもう一度繰り返すだけよね」Alexがそう言えば、

  • and as far as I could tell, she was right.

    私もその通りだと思っていました。

  • Work happened later, marriage happened later,

    就職も結婚も、

  • kids happened later, even death happened later.

    出産も寿命でさえもまだ遠い未来なのです。

  • Twentysomethings like Alex and I had nothing but time.

    Alexと私のような20代には時間がいくらでもありました。

  • But before long, my supervisor pushed me

    だが、しばらくすると、教授が私に

  • to push Alex about her love life.

    Alexの恋愛問題に直視するように言ってきました。

  • I pushed back.

    しかし、私はこう返しました。

  • I said, "Sure, she's dating down,

    「確かに、彼女には付き合っている人がいて

  • she's sleeping with a knucklehead,

    彼と一緒に寝たりしています、

  • but it's not like she's going to marry the guy."

    ですが、その人と結婚することではないでしょう?」

  • And then my supervisor said,

    そして、教授はこう言いました。

  • "Not yet, but she might marry the next one.

    「今は大丈夫でも、次の人とは結婚するかもしれないでしょう。」

  • Besides, the best time to work on Alex's marriage

    それに、Alexが結婚のことを考える最適の時期は

  • is before she has one."

    彼女が結婚相手に出会う前が最適なのです」と。

  • That's what psychologists call an "Aha!" moment.

    これこそ心理学者が「閃き」と呼ぶ瞬間です。

  • That was the moment I realized, 30 is not the new 20.

    その時が30代は20代の繰り返しではないと気づいた瞬間でした。

  • Yes, people settle down later than they used to,

    確かに、家庭を築くのは昔より遅くなりましたが、

  • but that didn't make Alex's 20s a developmental downtime.

    しかし、それがAlexの20代が発展停滞期になるという訳ではありません。

  • That made Alex's 20s a developmental sweet spot,

    むしろ、Alexが発展できるゴールデンタイムなのです。

  • and we were sitting there blowing it.

    それを私たちは無駄に過ごしているのです。

  • That was when I realized that this sort of benign neglect

    その時私が悟ったのが、このような善意の見て見ぬ振りこそが

  • was a real problem, and it had real consequences,

    真の問題で、それはのちに重大な影響を及ぼすのだと。

  • not just for Alex and her love life

    Alexと彼女の恋愛に限らず、

  • but for the careers and the families and the futures

    20代全般の若者の職歴や家庭、未来までにも

  • of twentysomethings everywhere.

    影響を及ぼすのです。

  • There are 50 million twentysomethings

    5000万人の20代が

  • in the United States right now.

    現在アメリカにいます。

  • We're talking about 15 percent of the population,

    人口の15%を対象とした話をしているわけですが、

  • or 100 percent if you consider

    100%でもあるのです。なぜなら、

  • that no one's getting through adulthood

    20代を通らずに

  • without going through their 20s first.

    大人になる人はいないからです。

  • Raise your hand if you're in your 20s.

    20代の方は手を挙げてみてください。

  • I really want to see some twentysomethings here.

    ここに何名か20代の方がいれば良いのですが。

  • Oh, yay! Y'all's awesome.

    まぁ!いいですね、素晴らしい。

  • If you work with twentysomethings, you love a twentysomething,

    もし20代の方が同僚にいたり、20代の方に恋をしていたり、

  • you're losing sleep over twentysomethings, I want to see

    20代の方を考えずには眠れない方、どれどれ(挙手)

  • Okay. Awesome, twentysomethings really matter.

    オーケー、素晴らしい、20代が本当に重要だと物語っていますね。

  • So I specialize in twentysomethings because I believe

    そこで、私は20代を専門としています。なぜなら、

  • that every single one of those 50 million twentysomethings

    5000万人の全ての20代に

  • deserves to know what psychologists,

    以下のことを知ってもらう価値があるからです。心理学者、

  • sociologists, neurologists and fertility specialists

    社会学者、神経学者、生殖受胎に関する専門家

  • already know:

    がすでに知っていることを。それは、

  • that claiming your 20s is one of the simplest,

    20代を有効に活かすのは、最も単純な一つで、

  • yet most transformative, things you can do

    しかし最も変化に富み、物事を

  • for work, for love, for your happiness,

    仕事のため、愛のため、幸せのため

  • maybe even for the world.

    もしかしたら、世界のためにさえ行うことができるということです。

  • This is not my opinion. These are the facts.

    これは私個人の意見ではありません。事実なのです。

  • We know that 80 percent of life's most defining moments

    人生を決めてしまう様な事柄の80%が

  • take place by age 35.

    35歳までに起こると知られています。

  • That means that eight out of 10 of the decisions

    それは、10のうちの8の

  • and experiences and "Aha!" moments

    経験と「アハ体験」

  • that make your life what it is

    が人生を決定付け、それらが

  • will have happened by your mid-30s.

    30代半ばまでに起こるということです。

  • People who are over 40, don't panic.

    40代を超えた方達は、焦らずに。

  • This crowd is going to be fine, I think.

    ここにいる皆さんは、大丈夫だと私は思います。

  • We know that the first 10 years of a career

    キャリアの最初10年間が

  • has an exponential impact

    指数関数的に

  • on how much money you're going to earn.

    今後いくら稼ぎ得るのか関係します。

  • We know that more than half of Americans

    アメリカ人の半数以上が、

  • are married or are living with or dating

    30歳前に同棲、デートの相手が

  • their future partner by 30.

    生涯のパートナーになります。

  • We know that the brain caps off its second

    脳は20代の時に二回目の

  • and last growth spurt in your 20s

    そして最後の成長を迎えます。

  • as it rewires itself for adulthood,

    大人に向け、脳が配線され直され、

  • which means that whatever it is you want to change about yourself,

    それはつまり、自分を変えたいと思うならば、

  • now is the time to change it.

    今こそが、変わる時なのです。

  • We know that personality changes more during your 20s

    性格は20代の時に

  • than at any other time in life,

    他のどの年代よりも大きく変わることは知られています。

  • and we know that female fertility peaks at age 28,

    そして、女性の妊娠のピークは、28歳だということも。

  • and things get tricky after age 35.

    そして、35歳以降は困難が生じてきます。

  • So your 20s are the time to educate yourself

    だから、20代は自分を育てるのに適した時期なのです。

  • about your body and your options.

    自分の体や、人生の選択肢についても。

  • So when we think about child development,

    子供の発達について考える時、

  • we all know that the first five years are a critical period

    最初の5年間が

  • for language and attachment in the brain.

    言語や、愛着の絆の臨界期(重要な時期)だと言われています。

  • It's a time when your ordinary, day-to-day life

    その期間は、一般的な日常生活が、

  • has an inordinate impact on who you will become.

    今後どのように育つかに大きな影響を及ぼします。

  • But what we hear less about is that there's such a thing

    しかし、成人期の発育なんてあまり耳にしません。

  • as adult development, and our 20s

    20代は、

  • are that critical period of adult development.

    大人への発育の臨界期なのにも関わらずです。

  • But this isn't what twentysomethings are hearing.

    しかし、20代の人はそんなこと耳にしないわけです。

  • Newspapers talk about the changing timetable of adulthood.

    ニュースは成人期の時期が変化してきていると報じます。

  • Researchers call the 20s an extended adolescence.

    研究者は20代を青春期の延長だと呼びます。

  • Journalists coin silly nicknames for twentysomethings

    ジャーナリストも20代にふざけたあだ名、例えば

  • like "twixters" and "kidults."

    「パラサイトシングル(大人のすねをかじる子供)」や「キダルト(子供大人)」などと名付けます。

  • It's true.

    これは事実なのです。

  • As a culture, we have trivialized what is actually

    文化的に、私たちは大人になる10年という時期を

  • the defining decade of adulthood.

    軽く扱ってきました。

  • Leonard Bernstein said that to achieve great things,

    Leonard Bernstein はこう言います。偉大なことを成し遂げるためには、

  • you need a plan and not quite enough time.

    計画を立てる必要があり、そして時間は十分にはないと

  • Isn't that true?

    まさしく、真実ではないでしょうか?

  • So what do you think happens

    以下のことが起きたらどう思いますか?

  • when you pat a twentysomething on the head and you say,

    20代の頭を撫でながら、

  • "You have 10 extra years to start your life"?

    「人生を始めるにはあと10年ある」と言ったらどうでしょう?

  • Nothing happens.

    何も起きません。

  • You have robbed that person of his urgency and ambition,

    その人から危機感と野心を奪うだけで、

  • and absolutely nothing happens.

    絶対に何も起こりません。

  • And then every day, smart, interesting twentysomethings

    そして毎日、賢く、面白い20代

  • like you or like your sons and daughters

    あなたやあなたの息子または娘のような20代が

  • come into my office and say things like this:

    私のオフィスを訪れ、次のようなことを言うのです。

  • "I know my boyfriend's no good for me,

    「この彼氏は良くないことはわかっているわ、

  • but this relationship doesn't count. I'm just killing time."

    でも、この関係は真剣な交際までの時間つぶしだからいいでしょう」

  • Or they say, "Everybody says as long as I get started

    または、「皆が、仕事を

  • on a career by the time I'm 30, I'll be fine."

    30歳までに始めれば大丈夫だと言っている」と言うのです。

  • But then it starts to sound like this:

    しかし、次第にこのように言い始めます。

  • "My 20s are almost over, and I have nothing to show for myself.

    「私の20代はもう直ぐ終わるわ、でも何も自慢出来るものがないの、

  • I had a better resume the day after I graduated from college."

    大学を卒業した瞬間の履歴書の方がよっぽどいいわ」と。

  • And then it starts to sound like this:

    そして、その後このように言い始めます。

  • "Dating in my 20s was like musical chairs.

    「20代の頃の私のデートはまるでイス取りゲームの様だったわ。

  • Everybody was running around and having fun,

    皆が走り回ってて、楽しかったわ

  • but then sometime around 30 it was like the music turned off

    でも、30代になると音楽がまるで止まったかの様に、

  • and everybody started sitting down.

    皆が座り始めたの。

  • I didn't want to be the only one left standing up,

    立っている最後の一人になりたくなかったの、

  • so sometimes I think I married my husband

    だから、時々思うのです、夫と結婚したのは、

  • because he was the closest chair to me at 30."

    30歳の時、一番近くのイスが彼だったからと」

  • Where are the twentysomethings here?

    20代の方はどこにいますか?

  • Do not do that.

    この様にはしないでくださいね。

  • Okay, now that sounds a little flip, but make no mistake,

    少し軽々しく聞こえますが、誤ってはいけません、

  • the stakes are very high.

    リスクはとても高いです。

  • When a lot has been pushed to your 30s,

    多くの物事を30代まで後回しにすると、

  • there is enormous thirtysomething pressure

    30歳でのプレッシャーはとてつもないものになります。

  • to jump-start a career, pick a city, partner up,

    事業を初め、住む街を決め、パートナーを探し、

  • and have two or three kids in a much shorter period of time.

    そして、2人または3人の子供をよりずっと短い期間で出産することになります。

  • Many of these things are incompatible,

    これらの多くのことは、両立しにくいです、

  • and as research is just starting to show,

    研究が示し始めたように、

  • simply harder and more stressful to do

    単純に困難かつ多くのストレスを伴うのです。

  • all at once in our 30s.

    30代の間に全てのことをまとめてやろうとすると。

  • The post-millennial midlife crisis

    2000年以降の中年に起こる危機は、

  • isn't buying a red sports car.

    真っ赤なスポーツカーを買うことではなく、

  • It's realizing you can't have that career you now want.

    望む仕事に就けないということで現れます。

  • It's realizing you can't have that child you now want,

    子供が欲しいのに産めなかったり、

  • or you can't give your child a sibling.

    子供に兄弟を作ってあげられないという形で現れます。

  • Too many thirtysomethings and fortysomethings

    実に多くの30代と40代が

  • look at themselves, and at me, sitting across the room,

    診察室の向かい側に座っている私と自分を見比べて

  • and say about their 20s,

    自身の20代について、話します。

  • "What was I doing? What was I thinking?"

    「私は今まで一体何をしてたの?何を考えていたの?」と。

  • I want to change what twentysomethings

    私は、20代のしていることや、考えていることを

  • are doing and thinking.

    変えたいのです。

  • Here's a story about how that can go.

    どのように変えるのか、うってつけの話があります。

  • It's a story about a woman named Emma.

    Emmaという女性のお話です。

  • At 25, Emma came to my office

    Emmaは25歳の時、私の診察室に来ました。

  • because she was, in her words, having an identity crisis.

    なぜなら、彼女の言葉を借りると、彼女はアイデンティティーの危機に陥っていたからです。

  • She said she thought she might like to work in art

    芸術もしくは娯楽の分野で働ければいいなと考えていましたが、

  • or entertainment, but she hadn't decided yet,

    彼女は決めることができませんでした。

  • so she'd spent the last few years waiting tables instead.

    そのため、代わりに数年間ウィトレスとして、働いていました。

  • Because it was cheaper, she lived with a boyfriend

    安く済むという理由で、彼女は彼氏と同棲していました。

  • who displayed his temper more than his ambition.

    その彼氏というのも、野心よりも感情を表に出す人でした。

  • And as hard as her 20s were,

    彼女の20代は、困難なものでしたが、

  • her early life had been even harder.

    それ以前の生活はもっと困難なものでした。

  • She often cried in our sessions,

    診察中、彼女は何度も涙を流しました。

  • but then would collect herself by saying,

    しかし、その後毎回次のように言って、自分を落ち着かせていました。

  • "You can't pick your family, but you can pick your friends."

    「家族は選べないけれど、友達は選べる」

  • Well one day, Emma comes in

    ある日、Emma がやって来て、

  • and she hangs her head in her lap,

    頭を垂れ、膝を抱え、

  • and she sobbed for most of the hour.

    診察時間の大半を泣いて過ごしました。

  • She'd just bought a new address book,

    彼女は、ちょうど新しい連絡帳を買って、

  • and she'd spent the morning filling in her many contacts,

    その朝は、多数ある連絡先を連絡帳に書き込みながら過ごしていましたが、

  • but then she'd been left staring at that empty blank

    ある一箇所を空欄のまま残し、そこをジッと見つめていました。

  • that comes after the words

    その空欄は、次の言葉から始まるものでした。

  • "In case of emergency, please call ... ."

    「緊急の場合は、こちらにご連絡ください」

  • She was nearly hysterical when she looked at me and said,

    彼女はほとんどヒステリックの状態で、私を見てこう言いました。

  • "Who's going to be there for me if I get in a car wreck?

    「もし私が交通事故にあった時、誰が来てくれるの?」

  • Who's going to take care of me if I have cancer?"

    「もし私が癌にかかったら、誰が面倒を見てくれるの?」

  • Now in that moment, it took everything I had

    その瞬間、私は、必死に

  • not to say, "I will."

    「私がするわ」と言うのをこらえていました。

  • But what Emma needed wasn't some therapist

    しかし、Emmaが必要としていたのは、

  • who really, really cared.

    とても丁寧に面倒を見てくれるセラピストではありません。

  • Emma needed a better life, and I knew this was her chance.

    Emmaはより良い生活を必要としていました、そして私はこれが人生を考える転機になると思いました。

  • I had learned too much since I first worked with Alex

    Alexを診て以来、私は多くのことを学んで来ていたため、

  • to just sit there while Emma's defining decade

    Emmaが大切な10年間を無駄にするのを、ただそこに座っていて

  • went parading by.

    何もしないわけにはいきませんでした。

  • So over the next weeks and months,

    その後、数週間数ヶ月に渡り、

  • I told Emma

    私はEmmaに

  • three things that every twentysomething, male or female,

    男女問わず全ての20代が聞くに値する、3つのこと

  • deserves to hear.

    を伝えました。

  • First, I told Emma to forget about having an identity crisis

    一つ目は、Emmaにアイデンティティーの危機を持つのを忘れるように言い、

  • and get some identity capital.

    何か、アイデンティティーの元となる何かを得るよう言いました。

  • By get identity capital, I mean do something

    私の言う、アイデンティティーの元となる何かとは、

  • that adds value to who you are.

    自分の価値を高める何かを意味します。

  • Do something that's an investment

    何か投資をするのです、

  • in who you might want to be next.

    将来なりたいものに近づくために。

  • I didn't know the future of Emma's career,

    私には、Emmaの将来の職業はわかりません、

  • and no one knows the future of work, but I do know this:

    誰も将来の職業などわかりません、ですが、私にはこのことはわかります。

  • Identity capital begets identity capital.

    アイデンティティーの元はアイデンティティーの元を次々呼び込むと。

  • So now is the time for that cross-country job,

    つまり、今こそが、国際的な仕事や、

  • that internship, that startup you want to try.

    インターンシップ、起業など試したいことを始めるのにもっとも適した時期なのです。

  • I'm not discounting twentysomething exploration here,

    私は、20代が色々と模索するのを軽視しているわけではありません、

  • but I am discounting exploration that's not supposed to count,

    ただ、人生に意味をもたらさないような模索を軽視しているのです。

  • which, by the way, is not exploration.

    だが、それだと模索とさえも呼べないのです。

  • That's procrastination.

    それは先送りにしているだけにしか過ぎません。

  • I told Emma to explore work and make it count.

    私はEmmaに職を模索し、また目的に合うものを選ぶよう伝えました。

  • Second, I told Emma that the urban tribe is overrated.

    二つ目は、都会の人は過剰評価されているということを話しました。

  • Best friends are great for giving rides to the airport,

    親友は空港まで送ってくれたりしますが、

  • but twentysomethings who huddle together

    20代が同じ考えの人だけで、一緒に集まっていると、

  • with like-minded peers limit who they know,

    知っている人や、

  • what they know, how they think, how they speak,

    知っていること、考え方、話し方、

  • and where they work.

    働いている場所などが限られた範囲内におさまってしまいます。

  • That new piece of capital, that new person to date

    新しく自分の資本になるものや新しい交際相手は

  • almost always comes from outside the inner circle.

    ほとんど常に内輪のサークルの外にいます。

  • New things come from what are called our weak ties,

    新たな物事はいわゆる、ゆるい繋がりからやってきます。

  • our friends of friends of friends.

    友達の友達の友達のような。

  • So yes, half of twentysomethings are un- or under-employed.

    そう、20代の半分は無職か、アルバイトをしています。

  • But half aren't, and weak ties

    しかし、半分は違うのです、ゆるい繋がりこそが

  • are how you get yourself into that group.

    後者の集団に入る方法なのです。

  • Half of new jobs are never posted,

    新しい仕事の半分は募集されません、

  • so reaching out to your neighbor's boss

    そのため、近所の上司に接触することが、

  • is how you get that un-posted job.

    募集されていない仕事を手に入れる手段となります。

  • It's not cheating. It's the science of how information spreads.

    それは決して卑怯ではありません、情報はこのように広がるものだからです。

  • Last but not least, Emma believed that

    最後ですが、忘れてはならないのが、Emmaが信じていた、

  • you can't pick your family, but you can pick your friends.

    家族は選べないが、友達は選べるは、

  • Now this was true for her growing up,

    育ってきた時はその通りでしたが、

  • but as a twentysomething, soon Emma would pick her family

    20代にもなれば、Emmaは次第に家族を選ぶでしょう。

  • when she partnered with someone

    誰かのパートナーとなり、

  • and created a family of her own.

    自身の家族を築く時なのです。

  • I told Emma the time to start picking your family is now.

    私はEmmaに今こそ、家族を選び始める時だと伝えました。

  • Now you may be thinking that 30

    あなたは恐らく、30歳は

  • is actually a better time to settle down

    落ち着くのに適している時期だと思うかもしれません。

  • than 20, or even 25,

    20歳や、25歳よりもずっと。

  • and I agree with you.

    それには私も同意します。

  • But grabbing whoever you're living with or sleeping with

    しかし、誰でもいいからと同棲相手や、一緒に寝た相手を捕まえるのは、

  • when everyone on Facebook starts walking down the aisle

    (皆がフェイスブック上で結婚報告をし始めた時に)

  • is not progress.

    自分を高めることにはなりません。

  • The best time to work on your marriage

    結婚の準備をするのに最も良い時期は、