Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • It strips you of your soul.”

    "魂を奪われる"

  • That's how one person described what happened in the dreaded Sleep Room.

    ある人は、恐ろしいスリープルームで起こったことをそう表現しました。

  • Just imagine.

    想像してみてください。

  • It's the 1950s.

    1950年代の話です。

  • It's Canada, not the USA, but the CIA's dark storm of mind experiments has managed

    アメリカではなくカナダですが、CIAの暗黒の精神実験の嵐で、なんとか

  • to cross over the border.

    を使って、国境を越えることができます。

  • It's all top secret of course, just another black site where mad scientists will commit

    もちろん全てが極秘で、狂った科学者が犯すブラックサイトの一つに過ぎない。

  • unspeakable horrors on innocent people.

    何の罪もない人々に、言葉にならないほどの恐怖を与える。

  • People entered the Sleep Room thinking they were going to be cured, believing that doctors

    睡眠室に入る人は、医者の言うことを信じて「治る」と思っていた。

  • were the good guys.

    は良い人たちだった。

  • Hadn't those doctors all sworn on the Hippocratic Oath?

    医師たちは皆、ヒポクラテスの誓いを立てていたのではなかったか。

  • “I will abstain from all intentional wrong-doing and harm, especially from abusing the bodies

    "意図的な不正行為や危害を加えること、特に身体を酷使することを慎みます」。

  • of man or woman, bond or free.”

    男でも女でも、束縛でも自由でも」。

  • That didn't happen in the Sleep Room; quite the opposite.

    スリープルームではそうはならなかった、その逆だ。

  • You went in and they slowly rearranged your mind.

    中に入ると、ゆっくりと心の整理をしてくれました。

  • They took a barely cracked vase, smashed it to pieces, and rebuilt it, adding some of

    かろうじてヒビが入っていた花瓶を粉々にして、それを再構築して、いくつかの

  • their own terrible features.

    それぞれの恐ろしい特徴があります。

  • Welcome to Frankenstein's monsterthe mind version.

    フランケンシュタインの怪物...心のバージョンへようこそ。

  • Ok, prepare to hear something that sounds like the script of a horror movie.

    OK、ホラー映画の脚本のような音を聞く準備をしてください。

  • Let's start with the story of one woman, who's tale has been told by her granddaughter.

    まずは、お孫さんに語り継がれている一人の女性の話から始めましょう。

  • In 1956, the grandmother, named Velma Orlikow, arrived at a Canadian psychiatric hospital

    1956年、ヴェルマ・オルリコフという名の祖母が、カナダの精神病院にやってきた。

  • in Montreal called the Allan Memorial Institute.

    モントリオールにある「Allan Memorial Institute」という研究所です。

  • She was there to get help.

    彼女は助けを求めに来たのだ。

  • She'd just had a child and was suffering from serious depression, what's called Postpartum

    彼女は子供を産んだばかりで、産後と呼ばれる深刻なうつ状態に悩まされていました。

  • depression or postnatal depression.

    うつ病や産後うつなどの

  • She was irritable, couldn't sleep.

    イライラして、眠れなかった。

  • Sometimes she'd just break down crying.

    時には泣き崩れることもありました。

  • That sounds bad, but it affects around 15 percent of new mothers.

    それは悪いことのように聞こえますが、新米ママの約15%が影響を受けています。

  • It is difficult of course, but it can be treatedat least by doctors with good intentions.

    もちろん難しいですが、治療は可能です...少なくとも善意の医師は。

  • That's not what Mrs. Orlikow experienced, not by a long way.

    それは、オルリコフ夫人が経験したことではない。

  • She was about to be used as a lab rat by a man who was at one point not only the president

    彼女は、一時は大統領であるだけでなく、実験室のネズミとして利用されようとしていました。

  • of the Canadian Psychiatric Association but also the American Psychiatric Association

    カナダ精神医学会だけでなく、アメリカ精神医学会でも

  • and World Psychiatric Association.

    と世界精神医学会。

  • His name was Donald Cameron.

    彼の名前は、ドナルド・キャメロン。

  • His eminence in the circles of psychiatry was never in doubt, but he was also a highly-educated

    精神医学界での彼の名声は疑う余地がありませんでしたが、彼はまた、高い教育を受けていました。

  • thug who would destroy the lives of hundreds of people, all backed by the CIA.

    何百人もの人々の生活を破壊するような凶悪犯で、すべてCIAがバックアップしている。

  • In that winter of '56 young Orlikow tramped through the thick snow to arrive at the foreboding

    56年の冬、若きオルリコフは厚い雪を踏みしめながら、不吉な予感を漂わせていた

  • castle-like structure that was the psychiatric hospital.

    城のような建物が精神病院だった。

  • What she didn't know is that over the border in the US politicians and military men had

    彼女が知らなかったのは、国境を越えたアメリカでは、政治家や軍人たちが

  • been going out of their minds themselves.

    は、自分でも気が狂いそうだった。

  • What they'd been trying to figure out is why US POWs came back to the states saying

    彼らが考えていたのは、なぜアメリカの捕虜がアメリカに戻ってきたのか、ということだった。

  • they now embraced communism.

    彼らは今、共産主義を受け入れている。

  • How did good ole American soldiers turn commie, they wondered.

    善良なアメリカ人兵士がなぜ共産主義者になったのかと。

  • They didn't for a minute think it was the influence of Karl Marx.

    彼らは、それがカール・マルクスの影響だとは微塵も思っていなかった。

  • It was brainwashing, they thought.

    洗脳されていると思ったのだ。

  • We should get into that ourselves.

    私たち自身がそれに取り組むべきだと思います。

  • And that's what they did.

    そして、その通りになったのです。

  • They started their brainwashing programs in the Spring of 1953.

    1953年の春、彼らは洗脳プログラムを開始した。

  • The CIA had heard about this doctor named Cameron who worked up in Montreal.

    CIAは、モントリオールで働いているキャメロンという医師の話を聞いていた。

  • He was the guy that was working on changing people's behavior with his own methods.

    自分のやり方で人の行動を変えることに取り組んでいた人です。

  • The agency asked the doctor how could you completely change a person?

    代理店は、医師に「どうして人間を完全に変えてしまうことができるのですか?

  • Could you erase their past and create a new present?

    彼らの過去を消して、新しい現在を作ることができるだろうか?

  • Get to work,” they said, and here's a ton of money.

    "働け "と言われて、ここでトンズラした。

  • And so he did get to work, on Orlikow and hundreds of other people.

    そして彼は、オーリコーをはじめとする何百人もの人々のために、仕事を始めたのである。

  • This is how Orlikow's days usually went during her three months under the supervision

    このようにして、オルリコは3ヶ月間、監督の下で過ごすことになった。

  • of Dr. Cameron.

    キャメロン博士の

  • On some days, and throughout the day, she would receive high-voltage electroshock therapy.

    日によっては、一日中、高電圧の電気ショック療法を受けることもありました。

  • The voltage, you should understand, was much higher than had been used before in other

    その電圧は、それまでに他で使われていたものよりもはるかに高かったことを理解していただきたい。

  • hospitals.

    の病院です。

  • That in itself would be bad enough, and it isn't how you treat postnatal depression.

    それだけでも大変なのに、産後うつの治療法としてはあり得ないことです。

  • It's how you rub out a soul.

    魂を揉み消す方法です。

  • On other occasions, the doctor tried something else on Orlikow.

    別の機会には、医師はオルリコフに別のことを試してみた。

  • He'd give her such a massive dose of drugs that she'd fall into a drug-induced coma.

    彼は彼女に大量の薬を投与して、薬による昏睡状態に陥らせるのだ。

  • Thanks to a certain poison, the cocktail paralyzed her body.

    ある毒物のおかげで、そのカクテルは彼女の体を麻痺させた。

  • When she'd wake up she wouldn't really know what was happening, or who she was.

    目が覚めても、何が起きているのか、自分が誰なのか、よくわからない。

  • We are not talking about sleeping for 15 hours, we are talking about periods of sleep that

    15時間の睡眠ではなく、以下のような睡眠時間のことを言っています。

  • could last over a month or even a few months.

    は、1ヶ月以上、あるいは数ヶ月間続くこともあります。

  • Can you imagine that?

    想像できますか?

  • It gets worse.

    さらに悪いことに

  • Something very strange happened to them while they were sleeping.

    寝ている間にとても不思議なことが起こった。

  • We'll come back to that soon.

    その話はまた今度にしましょう。

  • When she awoke, there were more shocks, more confusion.

    目覚めたときには、さらなる衝撃と混乱があった。

  • But the worst thing, the thing that really messed her up, is that she was sometimes given

    しかし、最悪なことに、本当に彼女を混乱させたのは、彼女が時々与えられた

  • huge doses of the hallucinogenic drug, Lysergic acid diethylamide, aka LSD, aka acid.

    リゼルグ酸ジエチルアミド、別名LSD、別名アシッドと呼ばれる幻覚剤を大量に摂取した。

  • How do you think those merry pranksters and their friends got hold of it later in the

    愉快なイタズラ好きたちが、後になってどうやって手に入れたと思いますか?

  • 60s?

    60s?

  • Well, one of them had been part of the experiments himself in the US.

    彼らの中には、アメリカで自ら実験に参加していた人もいた。

  • The CIA unwittingly helped create the hippie movement, but that's a story for another

    CIAは知らず知らずのうちにヒッピー・ムーブメントの創出に貢献していたが、それはまた別の話である。

  • day.

    の日です。

  • If you know something about LSD you'll know even a small dose can change your life.

    LSDのことを知っている人なら、少量でも人生が変わることを知っているだろう。

  • A bad trip can really mess with your mind.

    悪い旅をしていると、心が荒んでしまうものです。

  • Now imagine taking what a US comedian once called a “heroic dose?”

    かつて米国のコメディアンが「英雄的な服用」と呼んだものを想像してみてください。

  • Imagine sleeping for a month, being shocked, and then being given enough LSD to make an

    1ヶ月間寝て、ショックを受けた後に、十分な量のLSDを飲まされたことを想像してみてください。

  • elephant see diamonds falling from the sky.

    空からダイヤモンドが降ってくるのを見た象さん。

  • According to research that happened when the CIA's mind experiments came to light many

    CIAの精神実験が明るみに出たときの調査によると、多くの人が

  • years later, those shocks and long-sleeps and mega-doses of drugs would reduce some

    数年後、それらの衝撃や長時間の睡眠、大量の薬の投与によって、いくつかの

  • adults in that hospital to the state of a young child.

    その病院の大人が、幼い子供の状態に。

  • They'd just whimper in corners.

    隅っこでグズグズしているだけ。

  • Phlegm would dribble down their chin.

    痰があごに垂れてくる。

  • They lost the ability to speak, to perform even the most basic of tasks.

    話すことも、基本的な仕事をすることもできなくなった。

  • They were erased, but controlling them was another matter.

    しかし、それを制御するのは別の問題だった。

  • Dr. Cameron tried.

    キャメロン博士は試みた。

  • Sometimes under the influence of LSD, he'd strap them to a chair, a la the dystopian

    時にはLSDの影響で、彼らを椅子に縛り付けて、ディストピアのような

  • novel, “A Clockwork Orange.”

    小説「時計じかけのオレンジ」。

  • He'd then play them messages on repeat for days on end.

    そして、そのメッセージを何日も繰り返し再生するのです。

  • This was to reprogram their minds.

    これは、彼らの心を再プログラムするためである。

  • Endlessly they'd listen to all the positive things about their new personality, and then

    延々と新しい人格の良いところばかりを聞かされて、そして

  • the recording would switch to all the negative things.

    録画がネガティブなことばかりに切り替わってしまう。

  • This is what the granddaughter said about that after doing her research:

    それを孫娘が調べて言ったのがこれ。

  • He couldn't get his patients to listen to them enough so he put speakers in football

    "彼は、患者に十分に聞いてもらえなかったので、サッカーにスピーカーを入れたのです。

  • helmets and locked them on their heads.

    ヘルメットを被り、頭に固定する。

  • They were going crazy banging their heads into walls, so he then figured he could put

    彼らは壁に頭をぶつけて気が狂ったようになっていたので、彼はそれならば自分の頭に

  • them in a drug-induced coma and play the tapes as long as he needed.”

    彼らを薬で昏睡させて、必要なだけテープを再生した」。

  • Documents revealed that her grandmother had received mega-doses of LSD on 14 different

    祖母が14回に渡ってLSDを大量に摂取していたことが文書で明らかになった。

  • occasions.

    の場面があります。

  • Every time she'd turn away, pleading with the nurses to not give her another dose.

    そのたびに彼女は目を背け、「もう飲まないで」と看護師に訴えていた。

  • When she did that, the nurses would shout at her, telling her she was an evil mother,

    そうすると、看護師さんたちが「あなたは悪い母親だ」と怒鳴っていたそうです。

  • a bad person, that she was refusing the very stuff that would make her a better person.

    彼女は悪い人間であり、より良い人間になるためのものを拒否していたのです。

  • After the doses, she often screamed, telling the nurses that her skin was melting off her

    投与後、彼女はしばしば悲鳴を上げ、看護師に「皮膚が溶けていく」と言っていました。

  • bones.

    の骨になります。

  • That's what you call a bad trip.

    それがバッドトリップというものだ。

  • Ok, so after three months of that, how do you think you'd feel?

    OK、では3ヶ月後、あなたはどう感じると思いますか?

  • How do you think the woman coped with life after her stint with Doc Cameron?

    ドク・キャメロンとの関係が終わった後、彼女はどのように生活していたのでしょうか?

  • The answer is, she didn't cope very well.

    答えは、彼女はあまりうまく対処できなかった。

  • Once she was back on the outside she was never herself again.

    一旦、外に出てしまうと自分を見失ってしまう。

  • She couldn't handle many kinds of situations, especially when in public.

    特に人前では、様々な状況に対応できませんでした。

  • The smallest thing could set her off screaming.

    些細なことでも、彼女は悲鳴を上げる。

  • She might be in a shop and drop her purse and then just grab her head and begin to wail

    お店で財布を落とした後、頭を掴んで泣き出すかもしれません。

  • and shout.

    と叫んでいます。

  • As her granddaughter said, she would just explode into fits of hysteria.

    孫娘が言ったように、彼女はヒステリーを起こして爆発してしまうのだ。

  • She spent a lot of time with her grandmother since her parents were often busy working,

    両親が仕事で忙しいため、祖母と過ごす時間が多かった。

  • so she saw firsthand the damage that had been done.

    そして、その被害を目の当たりにしたのです。

  • She said just reading one solitary newspaper would take her grandmother in the region of

    新聞を一冊読むだけで、おばあちゃんは約1,000万円かかるという。

  • three weeks.

    3週間です。

  • Writing to a friend might take her months.

    友人に手紙を書くとなると、何ヶ月もかかるかもしれません。

  • It was as if she'd been slowed down, parts of her brain just wiped.

    まるでスピードが落ちたかのように、脳の一部が消去されてしまったのだ。

  • Years later, the daughter went after the CIA.

    数年後、娘はCIAの後を追った。

  • She wanted revenge.

    復讐したかったのだ。

  • She wanted at least the agency to admit its wrongdoings.

    せめて会社が非を認めてほしいと思っていた。

  • She wasn't alone.

    彼女は一人ではなかった。

  • There were hundreds of lives destroyed.

    何百人もの命が奪われた。

  • Another Canadian said her mother went to that hospital because she'd heard that the doctor

    別のカナダ人は、彼女の母親がその病院に行ったのは、その医師が

  • named Cameron could almost perform miracles.

    というキャメロンは、ほとんど奇跡を起こすことができた。

  • Well, it turned out that his miracles included keeping that woman in a drug-induced sleep

    彼の奇跡は、その女性を薬で眠らせておくことだったのです。

  • on two occasions, once for 18 days and the second time for 29 days.

    を18日間と29日間の2回に分けて実施しました。

  • When she woke up, she was also subjected to a series of painful and powerful electric

    また、目が覚めたときには、痛くて強力な電気を何度も浴びせられていました。

  • shocks.

    のショックを受けています。

  • She was given those massive doses of LSD and a cocktail of other drugs.

    彼女は大量のLSDと他の薬物を投与された。

  • She also came out of there so messed up her life was incredibly difficult.

    また、彼女はそこから出てきたときには、人生が信じられないほど混乱していました。

  • This is what the daughter later said: “They say it was torture for human beings,

    これは、後に娘さんが語った言葉です。"人間のための拷問だった "というのだ。

  • human torture.

    人間の拷問。

  • What they attempt to do is erase your emotions.”

    彼らがやろうとしているのは、あなたの感情を消すことです」。

  • Her mother never joked and laughed again as she'd done before.

    母親は、以前のように冗談を言って笑うことは二度となかった。

  • She never discussed deep subjects.

    深い話はしませんでした。

  • She couldn't ever be lighthearted, just enjoy her days, because life was plagued with

    明るく楽しく過ごすことができなかったのです。

  • panic attacks, with constant anxiety.

    パニック障害で、常に不安を感じている。

  • That part of the brain that is responsible for fight or flight was terribly active all

    闘争や逃走をつかさどる脳の部分がひどく活性化していました。

  • the time.

    の時です。

  • Her life was ruined.

    彼女の人生は台無しになった。

  • Why did Cameron do this?

    なぜキャメロンはこんなことをしたのか?

  • Well, you already know that the CIA was conducting mind control experiments in the US with a

    さて、CIAがアメリカでマインドコントロールの実験をしていたことは、すでにご存じの通りで

  • program called, “Project MKUltra.”

    "Project MKUltra "と呼ばれるプログラムです。

  • Some books have even alluded to the fact that Charles Manson was a victim of this very secretive

    一部の書籍では、チャールズ・マンソンが、この極秘の

  • mind-control program.

    マインドコントロールプログラム。

  • The Unabomber, serial killer Ted Kaczynski, was almost certainly part of the project,

    ユナボマー(連続殺人犯)であるテッド・カジンスキーが、このプロジェクトに参加していたことはほぼ間違いない。

  • and even if it wasn't connected to MKUltra, he definitely underwent 200 hours of a study

    MKUltraとは関係ないにしても、彼は間違いなく200時間の研究を受けています。

  • called by its creators, a “purposely brutalizing psychological experiment.”

    制作者は「意図的に残虐な心理学的実験」と呼んでいます。

  • Such were the times, and then the CIA heard about Cameron and a treatment the doctor had

    そんな時代だったが、CIAはキャメロンのことを知り、医師が行った治療法を

  • come up with.

    を思いついた。

  • It was called, “psychic driving.”

    それは "サイキック・ドライビング "と呼ばれるものだった。

  • This mostly involved playing messages on loops to frazzled minds.

    これは主に、混乱した心にメッセージをループで流すというものでした。

  • It was a form of mental reprogramming.

    それは精神的な再プログラムの一種である。

  • To understand why he pioneered this, you have to know something about his philosophy.

    なぜ彼がこれを開拓したのかを理解するには、彼の哲学を知る必要があります。

  • You see, he'd grown up seeing two world wars.

    彼は2つの世界大戦を見て育ったからだ。

  • He understood very well the darkness in man that had been discussed by people such as

    などで語られてきた人間の闇をよく理解していた。

  • Sigmund Freud.

    ジークムント・フロイト

  • He understood Carl Jung's conviction about how a person could easily descend into the

    カール・ユングが提唱した、人は簡単に自分の心の中に入り込んでしまうという信念を理解していました。

  • underworld.

    アンダーワールド

  • Cameron said the reason why so many bad things happen in society is that weak minds could

    キャメロンは、社会で多くの悪いことが起こるのは、弱い心ができるからだと言います。

  • be easily influenced.

    影響を受けやすい。

  • He divided society simply into theweakand thestrong”.

    彼は社会を単純に「弱者」と「強者」に分けた。

  • Yep, it was that simple for him.

    そう、彼にとっては簡単なことだったのだ。

  • It sounds like eugenics, eh, and a lot like the opinions of a man named Adolf Hitler.

    それは優生学のようでもあり、アドルフ・ヒトラーという男の意見のようでもある。

  • Cameron believed there were good citizens, super-citizens, and the rest needed treatment.

    キャメロンは、善良な市民と超市民がいて、それ以外は治療が必要だと考えていた。

  • He said the weak needed to be taken out of society because if not, there will always

    弱者を社会から排除する必要がある、そうしないといつまでたっても

  • be chaos.

    はカオスです。

  • He called this weakness a social contagion that needed to be wiped out.

    この弱さを社会的な伝染病と呼んで、一掃しなければならないとした。

  • These people might just be shy, anxious, possessive, insecure, have a need to conform, or indeed

    このような人たちは、シャイだったり、不安だったり、独占欲が強かったり、自信がなかったり、人に合わせたいと思っていたり、本当に様々です。

  • be clinically mentally ill.

    臨床的な精神疾患であること。

  • They had to be changed.

    変える必要があったのだ。

  • But how to achieve this?

    しかし、それを実現するにはどうすればいいのか。

  • He believed that behavioral scientists could transform the so-called weak.

    彼は、行動科学者がいわゆる弱者を変えることができると信じていた。

  • They could reprogram people, only if the personality-changing doctors were part of all elements of society.

    人をプログラムし直すことができるのは、人格を変える医師が社会のあらゆる要素に組み込まれている場合に限られる。

  • These behavioral scientists, he said, should be part of schools, businesses, in government,

    このような行動科学者は、学校や企業、政府の一員として活躍すべきだと彼は言います。

  • everywhere.

    どこでもいいです。

  • Cameron once said: “Get it understood how dangerous these damaged,

    キャメロンはかつてこう言った。"破損したものがいかに危険かを理解してもらう。

  • sick personalities are to ourselvesand above all, to our children, whose traits are

    病気の個性は、自分自身に対して、そして何よりも、その特徴がある子供たちに対して

  • taking form, and we shall find ways to put an end to them.”

    形を変えて、それを終わらせる方法を考えよう」。

  • That is what the CIA heard, and so the agency wanted him on board.

    それを聞いたCIAは、彼を仲間に入れようとしたのだ。

  • They sponsored his research and they wanted results, although Cameron wasn't aware he

    彼らは彼の研究のスポンサーであり、結果を求めていたが、キャメロンは彼のことを知らなかった。

  • was being paid by the CIA.

    は、CIAからお金をもらっていたのです。

  • As is often the case, the CIA created a front organization, and it was that which paid for

    よくあることですが、CIAはフロント組織を作り、その組織がお金を出していました。

  • Cameron's experiments.

    キャメロンの実験

  • It's why he could afford to treat a woman with postnatal depression with sleep, shocks,

    だからこそ、産後うつの女性を睡眠、ショックで治療する余裕があったのだろう。

  • LSD and messages inside football helmets.

    LSDとアメフトのヘルメット内のメッセージ。

  • It's why he used the poison curare to basically paralyze his patients while he played them

    だからこそ、彼は毒物のクラーレを使って、演奏中の患者を基本的に麻痺させることができたのだ。

  • messages for weeks on end.

    のメッセージが何週間も続きました。

  • His record was keeping someone under for three months.

    彼の記録は、誰かを3ヶ月間監禁したことです。

  • He thought he was curing the sick, but he was only making them demented.

    彼は病気を治しているつもりだったが、病気を悪化させていただけだったのだ。

  • He was destroying them, like all mad scientists in the movies tend to do.

    映画に出てくるマッドサイエンティストがよくやるように、彼はそれらを破壊していた。

  • No one who went into the sleep room ever really fully came out of there.

    睡眠室に入った人が完全に出てきたことはない。

  • He believed hisde-patterningandpsychic drivingtechniques was re-making a human,

    彼は、自分の「脱パターニング」や「サイキック・ドライブ」の技術が人間を再構築すると信じていた。

  • but he was only taking a wrecking ball to minds that just needed some care and attention.

    しかし、彼は、手入れが必要な心にレッカーボールを当てていただけなのです。

  • You've heard the stories of two people, but there were hundreds of them, most of them

    二人の話を聞いたことがあると思いますが、何百人もの人がいて、そのほとんどが

  • going to the hospital with only minor problems.

    些細なことで病院に行く。

  • After the experiments, some of them had permanent amnesia.

    実験の後、彼らの中には永久記憶喪失になった者もいた。

  • Others became incontinent, meaning they'd pee themselves on occasions.

    また、失禁してしまう人もいて、おしっこを漏らしてしまうこともありました。

  • Some didn't even recognize their parents, brothers, sisters.

    自分の両親、兄弟、姉妹がわからない人もいました。

  • Most had post-traumatic stress disorder, and a few folks even lost the ability to speak

    ほとんどの人が心的外傷後のストレス障害を抱えており、中には言葉を失った人もいました。

  • for a while.

    暫くの間

  • Was Cameron serious in his belief that his experiments would help people?

    自分の実験が人の役に立つと信じていたキャメロンは本気だったのか?

  • Maybe, maybe not.

    そうかもしれないし、そうじゃないかもしれない。

  • Critics have said that in actual fact he was developing torture techniques to extract information

    実際のところ、彼は情報を引き出すための拷問技術を開発していたと批判されています。

  • from people, techniques that the CIA would use for many years to come.

    これは、CIAが長年にわたって使用してきた技術である。

  • MKUltra almost remained a secret.

    MKUltraはほとんど秘密のままだった。

  • In the mid-70s the CIA director demanded that every single file that even minutely discussed

    70年代半ば、CIA長官は、少しでも話題になっているファイルをすべて回収するよう要求した。

  • MKUltra had to be destroyed, and that included anything related to Dr. Cameron.

    MKUltraは破壊されなければならず、その中にはキャメロン博士に関するものも含まれていました。

  • It didn't happen.

    実現しませんでした。

  • 20,000 related files surfaced, prompting some people to ask if they were doing that then,

    2万件の関連ファイルが浮上し、「あの時、そんなことをしていたのか」という声が上がった。

  • what are they doing now?

    彼らは今、何をしているのか?

  • Some of Cameron's notes have since come to light.

    その後、キャメロンのノートの一部が明らかになった。