Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • [HOST] 245 kilometers off the frigid coast of Antarctica is an island where populations of chinstrap  

    [HOST] 南極大陸の極寒の海岸から245キロ離れた島では、チンパンジーの個体群が

  • penguins live in the thousands. But these penguins are more than just cute. The health of the Antarctic  

    ペンギンは数千羽単位で生息しています。しかし、このペンギンたちはかわいいだけではありません。南極の健康について

  • ecosystem relies on their well being. So the  scientists in this next documentary, count them  

    生態系は彼らの幸福に依存しています。次のドキュメンタリーに登場する科学者たちは、数えてみると

  • yeah by hand in the freezing cold and walking  on steep cliffs. It's been years since this last  

    凍てつくような寒さの中、手で触れて、険しい崖を歩く。あれから何年も経っているのに

  • happened, but the data collected will now inform  them of how one of the most remote places on earth  

    しかし、収集されたデータは、地球上で最も遠い場所の一つであるこの場所がどのように機能しているかを示すものです。

  • is faring. If you want to know what  it took to film in such a hostile and  

    の様子をご紹介します。このような敵対的な環境での撮影に何が必要だったのかを知りたい方は

  • rather crowded location, stick around after  the credits for a Q&A with the filmmakers.  

    観客が少ない場所では、クレジットの後に映画監督とのQ&Aが行われます。

  • And now from, Greenpeace International, This is "Disappearing Penguins."

    グリーンピース・インターナショナルから、「消えゆくペンギン」です。

  • [NARRATOR] On the far side of the planet, lies one of  the most remote and inhospitable places on Earth.

    地球の裏側には、地球上で最も人を寄せ付けない場所があります。

  • Elephant Islandsituated just off  the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula,  

    南極半島の突端に位置するエレファント島。

  • is a rugged landscape of cliffs  and glaciers shaped by brutal  

    は、過酷な環境下で形成された断崖絶壁と氷河の険しい風景です。

  • winds. It's also home to vast colonies of  one of Antarctica's most iconic animals.  

    風。また、南極を代表する動物の広大なコロニーがあります。

  • Supported by environmental organizationGreenpeace, a team of scientists lands on  

    環境保護団体グリーンピースの支援を受けて、科学者チームが上陸しました。

  • Elephant Island. For the first time in 50 yearsthey will investigate how its penguins are faring.  

    エレファント島。50年ぶりにペンギンの様子を調査します。

  • The health of the Antarctic ecosystem is  linked to the state of penguin populations.  

    南極の生態系の健全性は、ペンギンの個体群の状態と連動しています。

  • And the best way to measure  those is by counting the birds.

    それを測るには、鳥を数えるのが一番です。

  • [FORREST] So we're counting penguins. And why do we count  penguins? Well, penguins are great bio-indicators.  

    それでペンギンを数えていますなぜペンギンを数えるのか?ペンギンは生物指標として優れています。

  • And they'll tell us what the health of the ocean  around Antarctica is because they krill krill eat  

    そして、オキアミを食べることで、南極周辺の海の健康状態を教えてくれます。

  • phytoplankton. So we can tell indirectly, what  the productivity of the oceans around here,  

    植物プランクトン。ですから、この辺りの海の生産性を間接的に知ることができるのです。

  • how it's responding to environmental changeAnd so we can't really adequately count the  

    環境の変化にどのように対応しているのか。 を十分に数えることができないわけです。

  • phytoplankton, it's really difficult to count  krill. But we can count penguins because they  

    植物プランクトンであるオキアミを数えるのはとても難しいです。しかし、ペンギンは数えることができます。

  • come ashore every year to the same places  to breed. And we're getting some idea about  

    毎年、同じ場所に上陸して繁殖しています。といったことがわかってきました。

  • how the ocean is performing by how  penguin populations change over time.  

    ペンギンの個体数がどのように変化するかによって、海がどのように動いているかを知ることができます。

  • And we go nest by nest. We're  counting this because we want  

    巣ごとに見ていきます。これを数えているのは、私たちが

  • to know what the breeding population is. We're  not interested in all these penguins that are  

    そのためには、繁殖個体数を知る必要があります。私たちが興味を持っているのは、これらのペンギンのうち

  • roaming around that you see kind of  wandering about here. A lot of those  

    ここで見られるような、その辺をうろうろしているもの。それらの多くは

  • are non-breeders. They just come here because  there's a lot of penguins, a lot of activity.  

    は非繁殖家です。ペンギンがたくさんいて、活気があるから、ここに来ているだけです。

  • We want to know what the size of the breeding  population is, because that's what's going to make  

    繁殖人口の規模を知りたいのですが、それによって

  • new penguins for the future. And those are  the most sensitive parts of this population.

    未来のための新しいペンギンたち。そしてそれらは、この個体群の中でも最も繊細な部分です。

  • [NARRATOR] There are multiple penguins  species on Elephant Island,  

    エレファント島には複数のペンギンが生息しています。

  • such as the Gentoo with their distinctive  orange beak, the flamboyant Macaroni Penguin,  

    オレンジ色のくちばしが特徴のジェンツーや、派手なマカロニペンギンなど。

  • and even these towering King penguinscarefully shuffling across the island.

    そして、このそびえ立つキングペンギンも、慎重に島を渡り歩いています。

  • [AMBIENT NOISE] Michael, Michael,

    マイケル、マイケル。

  • [NARRATOR]The researchers record all penguinsBut I'm mainly interested in chinstraps  

    研究者はすべてのペンギンを記録する。 でも、私は主にあごひもに興味があります。

  • so called for the narrow black band on the  underside of their heads. The chin straps are the  

    頭の下側に細い黒い帯があることからそう呼ばれています。あごひもの部分は

  • noisiest and most numerous penguin on the islandAnd since weather conditions here are not always  

    島で最も騒がしく、最も多くのペンギンが生息しています。 また、この島の気象条件は必ずしも良いとは限らないので

  • suitable for field work. The race is on to find  out exactly how numerous the chinstraps still are.

    フィールドワークに適しています。あごひもの数がまだどれだけあるのか、競争が始まっています。

  • [STRYKER] There's four of us penguin counters. One person  says, "Okay, I'll take the high point up to the  

    4人のペンギン・カウンターがいる。一人の人が「よし、私は高いところを上にして

  • right" one person says, "I'll go up to the leftone person, that's me today, starts down low  

    ある人は「右に行く」と言い、ある人は「左に行く」と言い、ある人は、今日の私ですが、低い位置からスタートします。

  • and we'll work our way up and then we all  meet in the middle. And it's important to  

    そして、私たちは上に向かって努力し、最後には全員が中央で出会うことになるのです。そして、重要なのは

  • divide it up like that so that we can be sure  not to be counting the same penguins twice.

    同じペンギンを2回数えないようにするために、このように分けています。

  • [NARRATOR] It's January, which means the  height of Antarctic summer  

    南極の夏の盛りである1月には

  • with one or two chicks to each nest. The colonies  are dense packs of shrieking and pecking birds,  

    それぞれの巣に1〜2羽の雛がいる。コロニーは悲鳴を上げながら突っつく鳥の密集した群れである。

  • which makes moving around a delicate affair.

    そのため、移動するのが大変です。

  • [STRYKER] Normally, we don't try to walk through the colony  because it's so dense, but here there's just no  

    普段は、コロニーが密集しているので、その中を歩こうとはしないのですが、ここではそれができません。

  • free space in between the thing right and so  very carefully. You try to step on the highest  

    の間に空きスペースがあるので、とても慎重に事を進めます。一番高いところを踏もうとすると

  • stones between the birds and obviously not  getting too close to their nests, if you can.

    鳥の間に石を置き、できれば巣に近づきすぎないようにする。

  • [STRYKER] Counting penguins at its core is pretty basicIt really is "1, 2, 3" we actually count them all three  

    ストライカー】 ペンギンの数え方は、基本中の基本です。実際には「1、2、3」と、3つとも数えますが

  • times to try to get a count that's within 5% errorIt kind of looks crazy. Sometimes we're standing  

    誤差が5%以内に収まるように、何度も試行錯誤を繰り返します。 狂気を感じますね。時には、立ったままで

  • on a rock gazing over a penguin colony. Very  still with our arms out And it looks like we're  

    岩の上でペンギンのコロニーを眺めています。両手を広げてじっとしていると、まるで私たちが

  • conducting a symphony of penguins or something  like that, because we're out there, really looking  

    ペンギンの交響曲を指揮するとか、そんな感じで、私たちは外に出て、本当に見ているのです。

  • at every single individual penguin, and literally  counting heads. And if there's only 10 penguins in  

    ひとりひとりのペンギンの頭数を数えていました。もしペンギンが10羽しかいなかったら

  • a colony, it's pretty easy. If there's 100, you  can get through them. If you're surrounded by  

    コロニーが1つあれば、かなり楽になります。100人いれば、それを乗り越えることができる。囲まれていたら

  • 1000 penguins in one big blob. That's what  I would call "Advanced Penguin Counting"

    1000羽のペンギンが1つの大きな塊になっている。これこそが "高度なペンギン数え "と言えるでしょう。

  • [NARRATOR] But some colonies are over 10,000 individuals,  

    しかし、中には1万体を超えるコロニーもあります。

  • and Chinstraps love to nest on steep and  exposed cliffs that are hard to reach on foot.  

    とチンアナゴは、歩いては行けないような険しい崖に好んで巣を作ります。

  • So to count all of these flightless birdsyour best bet is to take to the air.

    そこで、飛べない鳥たちを数えるためには、空を飛ぶのが一番です。

  • [SHAH] So when we get to colonies that are so big  that it's almost infeasible to count by hand,  

    だから、人の手では数えられないほど大きなコロニーになると

  • we use aerial surveys, the idea is to capture  all colonies with aerial images, so that we  

    空中調査では、すべてのコロニーを空中写真で撮影することで

  • can either use a manual count or machine  learning algorithm to do the counts for us.  

    は、手動でカウントするか、機械学習アルゴリズムを使ってカウントするかのどちらかになります。

  • When we arrive at a site, we do a quick lay  of the land where the different colonies are.  

    現場に到着すると、各コロニーがどこにあるのかを簡単に確認します。

  • And then we pick out a system where we can make  sure that we we don't miss any of the colonies.  

    そして、どのコロニーも見逃さないようなシステムを選び出します。

  • So we started a logical point, and set up a grid  survey with GPS locations of the boundaries of the  

    そこで、論理的な点からスタートして、境界線のGPS位置を設定してグリッドサーベイを行いました。

  • colonies. And then we launched the drone, and have  it run the grid patterns. And then at that point,  

    コロニーを作る。そしてドローンを打ち上げて グリッドパターンを実行させましたそして、その時点で

  • it's pretty hands off, it flies to the first  point and heads to the series of waypoints.  

    最初のポイントに飛んで、一連のウェイポイントに向かうだけの簡単なものです。

  • And the drone is able to take photos every two  seconds. And that's how we can get a set of  

    そして、ドローンは2秒ごとに写真を撮ることができます。そして、それによって私たちは、一連の

  • images with a decent amount of overlap that can  be used in the next step, which is photo mosaic.  

    次のステップであるフォトモザイクに使用できる、適度な重なりのある画像を作成します。

  • Once it finishes the whole  whole survey, we retrieve it.  

    一通りの調査が終わると、それを回収します。

  • And that's how we can finish a site and  then walk over to the next area. And so on.

    そうすることで、一つのサイトを終えて、次のエリアに歩いていけるのです。といった具合です。

  • [STRYKER] For a bird nerd like me being in the  middle of a penguin colony here and  

    私のような鳥類オタクにとって、ここはペンギンのコロニーのど真ん中で、しかも

  • practically unexplored Island in Antarctica  is like the ultimate experience. I can't  

    実際に南極の未踏の島に行ってみると、究極の体験のようです。私には

  • even describe it makes my skin tingle around the  Zodiac. And we're coming into the beat is seeing  

    表現するだけでも、干支のあたりで肌がピリピリします。そして、私たちは、ビートが見ている中に入っています。

  • all these birds waiting for us to arrive.

    私たちが来るのを待っている鳥たち。

  • [STRYKER] I love penguins, they're just, they're  so easy to empathize with, because  

    私はペンギンが大好きです、彼らはただ、とても共感しやすいのです、なぜなら

  • they act like people in so many ways. They have  all these curious behaviors they run around,  

    彼らは多くの点で人間のように行動します。彼らは好奇心旺盛な行動を取りまくります。

  • they're always on a mission up to something  they're very energetic, they're charismatic.

    彼らは常に何かに挑戦していて、とてもエネルギッシュで、カリスマ性があります。

  • penguins are really amazing creatures, they  are hardcore. And they have some pretty amazing  

    ペンギンは本当に素晴らしい生き物で、筋金入りです。そして、彼らはとても素晴らしい

  • adaptations to survive. Here. They have the  densest packed feathers of any bird in the world,  

    適応して生きていく。これです。世界の鳥類の中で最も密度の高い羽毛を持っています。

  • it's something like 90 feathers per square inch  that gives them their waterproof parka and down  

    1平方インチあたり90枚の羽毛を使って、防水パーカーやダウンを作っているのだそうです。

  • jacket all in one. They spend a lot of their time  swimming, they can swim for months at a stretch  

    のジャケットが一つになったものです。彼らは多くの時間を泳いで過ごし、一度に何ヶ月も泳ぐことができます

  • without stopping, they sleep on the ocean, the  only reason they ever come to land at all is to  

    停車せず、海の上で眠り、陸に上がってくるのは

  • build a nest. And then they go and spend the rest  of their lives actually in the ocean offshore. And  

    巣を作ります。そして、残りの人生を実際に沖合の海で過ごすのです。そして

  • to be an animal that only exists in the Southern  Ocean for months at a time just swimming around  

    南氷洋で数ヶ月間、ただ泳いでいるだけの動物というのは

  • finding the fish and krill that they need to eatThat is hard for us to imagine and comprehend. And  

    食べるために必要な魚やオキアミを探す。 これは私たちには想像も理解もできません。そして

  • that I think is partly why it's so  fascinating for us to see penguins down here.

    だからこそ、この地でペンギンを見るのはとても魅力的なのだと思います。

  • [STRYKER] I think that we can learn a lot by watching  birds, because birds at their core need  

    鳥を観察することで多くのことを学ぶことができると思います。

  • most of the same things that we do they  need a place to live, they need food,  

    私たちと同じように、彼らも住む場所や食べ物を必要としています。

  • they need to find a mate and leave a legacy. I  think that also birds experience all kinds of  

    彼らは仲間を見つけ、遺産を残さなければなりません。思うに、鳥も様々な経験をしているのではないでしょうか。

  • similar emotions and thoughts and feelings. Sothink by coming out here and doing these studies,  

    同じような感情や考え、気持ちを持っています。だから私は、ここに来てこのような研究をすることで

  • it's almost like we're looking at our own behavior  through the prism of another species. And that  

    それはまるで、自分の行動を他の種のプリズムを通して見ているようなものです。そしてその

  • gives us a license to take a step back and sayOh, yeah, okay, that's what's really happening.

    と一歩引いてみることができます。

  • [NARRATOR] Penguin colonies may remain in place for  centuries and Chinstraps, even though they  

    ペンギンのコロニーは何世紀にもわたって残っているし、あごひもは、たとえそれが

  • venture out to sea for hundreds of milesalways return to the same colony to breed.  

    何百マイルも海に飛び出しても、いつも同じコロニーに戻ってきて繁殖します。

  • The last and only time elephant islands penguin  population was properly surveyed, was in 1971.  

    エレファントアイランドのペンギンの数がきちんと調査されたのは、1971年が最後であり、唯一の機会でした。

  • The maps and data from that  British joint services expedition  

    そのイギリスの合同サービスの遠征での地図やデータは

  • are now being used by the present day researchers.

    は、現在の研究者にも利用されています。

  • [FORREST] So we've got some great data from 50 years ago  about what the p-penguin populations looked  

    50年前のペンギンの個体数のデータが残っています。

  • like. So we'll compare our counts to thatthat historic data and we'll get some idea about  

    のようなものです。そのため、過去のデータと比較して、何が起こっているのかを知ることができます。

  • whether things are changing or not.

    状況が変わっているかどうかに関わらず

  • penguins are extremely well adapted to live in  Antarctica in these conditions. But when those  

    ペンギンは、このような環境の南極で生きるために非常によく適応しています。しかし、それらが

  • conditions then start to change, that's when  we start getting worried about them because  

    このような状況になると、私たちは彼らのことが気になり始めます。

  • they've evolved over so many eons to live in this  place as it is, and then as it starts to change,  

    彼らは長い年月をかけて進化し、この場所でありのままに生き、そして変化し始めた。

  • then we'll see how adaptable the penguins can be.

    そのためには、ペンギンがどれだけ適応できるかが重要です。

  • [NARRATOR] The Antarctic is witnessing vast changes. Over the  past 50 years, temperatures have risen by around  

    南極では大きな変化が起きています。過去50年の間に、気温は約1.5倍に上昇しました。

  • three degrees centigrade, one of  the fastest increases in the world.  

    摂氏3度と、世界でも有数の急速な上昇を示しています。

  • Among other things, the  warming affects ice formation.  

    とりわけ、温暖化は氷の形成に影響を与えます。

  • And the underside of sea ice is a critical  habitat for krill, the shrimp like creatures  

    また、海氷の下は、オキアミというエビのような生物の重要な生息地です。

  • which are food for many of Antarctica's  animals, including Chinstrap penguins.

    南極に生息するチンパンジーをはじめとする多くの動物の餌となっている。

  • [FORREST] The climate change losers here are chinstrap  penguins. Every year where else we go on the  

    ここで気候変動の敗者となるのはチンアナゴです。毎年、どこの国に行っても

  • peninsula. We're seeing chinstrap declines over  the last 50 years, and it's been dramatic. Some  

    半島では過去50年の間にチンアナゴの減少が見られ、それは劇的なものでした。いくつかの

  • of those populations have declined as much as 50%  we've seen chinstrap colonies completely vanish.

    の個体数が50%も減少し、チンパンジーのコロニーが完全に消滅したこともあります。

  • [NARRATOR] A changing climate is not the  only threat to Chinstraps.  

    [Narrator] チンアナゴの脅威は気候の変化だけではありません。

  • In recent years, krill fishing has  caused competition for their food,  

    近年、オキアミ漁が彼らの餌の奪い合いを引き起こしています。

  • creating additional pressure on the penguins  in ways we are yet to fully understand.  

    これがペンギンにさらなるプレッシャーを与えていることは、いまだに完全には解明されていません。

  • After 10 days of counting and covering  98% of the colonies surveyed in 1971,  

    1971年に調査したコロニーの98%を10日間かけてカウントし、網羅した。

  • it's time for the researchers  to add up the results

    研究者が結果を集計する時が来た

  • [AMBIENT FORREST] 44...45....45....16, three times.

    AMBIENT FORREST】44...45....45....16、3回。

  • [NARRATOR] All of Elephant Island's 32  colonies show declines. And overall,  

    エレファント島にある32のコロニーのすべてが減少しています。そして全体では

  • the chinstrap population has  fallen by almost 60% in 50 years,

    は、50年間で約60%も減少しています。

  • [AMBIENT FORREST] 11, three times

    AMBIENT FORREST】11、3回目

  • [FORREST] we try to keep an impartial look at this in terms of our emotional response to the data.

    [FORREST] 私たちは、データに対する感情的な反応という点で、公平な視線を保つようにしています。

  • It's It's disturbing from the standpoint of the amount of change is happening so rapidly.

    それは、変化の大きさが急速に起こっているという観点から見て、気がかりなことです。

  • We just don't see this kind of stuffAnd other ecosystems generally. Have  

    このようなものは見たことがありません。 他の生態系も一般的に持っています。

  • you seen this with say any terrestrial mammal  species over a 50 year period people would be  

    これを例えば50年間の陸生哺乳類の種で見たら、人々は次のように思うでしょう。

  • certainly concerned. It suggests the amount of  change that's happening herehow rapid it's it is.  

    確かに心配です。それは、ここで起こっている変化の大きさ、つまりその急速さを示唆しています。

  • It remains to be seen what the  what the ultimate consequences are.  

    最終的にどのような結果になるのかはまだわかりません。

  • Not just for Chinstrap penguinsbut for the ecosystem as a whole.

    アゴヒゲペンギンだけでなく、生態系全体のためにも。

  • [STRYKER] If you removed all the penguins  from Antarctica, what would happen?  

    南極大陸からペンギンをすべて排除したらどうなるか?

  • I don't want to do that experiment. As  a scientist or as a person who loves  

    私はその実験をしたくありません。科学者として、あるいは好きな人として

  • birds. The penguins are a keystone in  Antarctica, there's something like 90% of  

    の鳥です。ペンギンは南極大陸の要であり、その90%は

  • the avian biomass in this region is penguinsAnd there are millions and millions of them.  

    この地域の鳥類のバイオマスはペンギンです。 そして、その数は何百万、何千万にものぼります。

  • We are seeing some worrying  declines in their populations.  

    そのため、個体数の減少が懸念されています。

  • So right now I'm not so much worried that  the chinstrap penguin is gonna go extinct  

    だから今は、チンアナゴが絶滅することをそれほど心配していません

  • as that they're telling us that  something in their larger ecosystem  

    より大きなエコシステムの中の何かを教えてくれているような気がします。

  • is broken in some way and that the changes  in their populations are reflecting that.

    が何らかの形で壊れていて、人口の変化がそれを反映しているのではないかと考えています。

  • [FORREST] I've been coming down here for 25 years, and I've  seen some pretty remarkable changes been seeing  

    私は25年前からここに来ていますが、かなりの変化を目の当たりにしてきました。

  • penguin populations crash, literally, climates  changing more rapidly in the Antarctic Peninsula,  

    ペンギンの個体数が激減し、文字通り、南極半島では気候の変化が激しくなる。

  • probably any place on the planet. It's very  likely that when we experience these things in our  

    おそらく地球上のどの場所でも。非常に可能性が高いのですが、私たちがこれらのことを経験すると

  • temperate climates, where we all live, we're  also going to have to adapt just as the  

    私たちが住んでいる温暖な気候の地域でも、日本と同じように適応していかなければならないでしょう。

  • chinstrap penguins are doing right now. So it's  a lesson for us because we've, we're either going to  

    アゴヒゲペンギンが今やっていることです。これは私たちにとって教訓となるでしょう。

  • heed this example that we're seeing down here  in the Antarctic, or we won't, and we'll suffer  

    南極で見ているこの例に従わなければ、私たちは苦しむことになるでしょう。

  • the consequences just as Unfortunately, the  chinstrap penguins seem to be doing down here.  

    その結果、残念ながら、チンストラップペンギンはこの地で活躍しているようです。

  • They don't have a chance to control their  environment. They're stuck with whatever we  

    彼らは自分の環境をコントロールするチャンスがありません。彼らは、私たちが何をしても

  • hand them, but we have the ability to change  and we should take serious measures to do so.

    しかし、私たちには変化する能力があり、そのための真剣な対策を講じるべきです。

  • [NARRATOR] Antarctica has always been a continent that  has challenged us. Now its challenge is for  

    南極大陸は、常に私たちに挑戦してきた大陸です。今、その挑戦は

  • us to leave it unharmed, and established large  scale protection for those living on the edge.

    私たちが無傷でいられるように、端っこに住んでいる人たちのために大規模な保護を確立したのです。

  • Now, let's hear from the ground team  on their experience of elephant Island  

    それでは、グランドチームによるエレファント・アイランドの体験談をお聞きください。

  • and its special occupants.

    とその特別な占有者。

  • [BENSON] So I'm Frida Benson, and I was expedition leader  for the expedition where this film was made.

    私はフリーダ・ベンソンで、この映画が撮影された遠征隊のリーダーを務めました。

  • [VAN ROUVEROY] And my name is Maartin Van Rouveroy. And  I was the onboard camera man, filmmaker,  

    私の名前はマーティン・ヴァン・ルヴェロイです。私は船上のカメラマンであり、映画製作者でした。

  • for this project that the film resulted from.

    このプロジェクトのために、この映画は生まれました。

  • [BENSON] Greenpeace is one of the oldest environmental  organization and is truly global. So it was  

    グリーンピースは最も古い環境保護団体のひとつであり、まさにグローバルな組織です。だから、それは

  • started 50 years ago, turning 50  years, actually, today with a sort of  

    は50年前に始まり、今日で50年目を迎え、ある種の

  • aim of a greener, peaceful world.

    緑豊かで平和な世界を目指して。

  • [VAN ROUVEROY] Yes, Elephant Island where we did most of the filming. It's very inhospitable, and it's been  

    VAN ROUVEROY】そう、エレファント・アイランドで、ほとんどの撮影を行いました。非常に人を寄せ付けない場所で、これまでも

  • visited by very few people. But famously, this  is where Ernest Shackleton the British explorer,  

    訪れる人はほとんどいません。しかし、有名なのは、イギリスの探検家アーネスト・シャックルトンがここを訪れたことです。

  • stranded with his men, and they had to  survive in the Antarctic winter. For us,  

    部下と一緒に座礁した彼らは、南極の冬を生き延びなければならなかった。私たちのために。

  • it was a bit more comfortable, because we were  based on a ship and we did these landings from  

    船をベースにしていたので、少しは快適だったし、上陸は

  • inflatable boats on the shore, then it's pretty  rocky shore. So you'd basically almost be launched  

    海岸にはインフレータブル・ボートが置かれていて、そこはかなりの岩場です。そのため、基本的にはほとんど打ち上げられることになります。

  • onto the shore like a penguin. And then you'd have  to bring all your equipment on board and clamber  

    をペンギンのように海岸に浮かべる。そして、すべての機材を船上に持ち込み、よじ登って

  • onto these pretty slippery rocks. And then the scientists would go off and find the penguin  

    滑りやすい岩の上に。そして、科学者はペンギンを探しに行くのですが

  • colonies, the photographer and I, and some of  the other people from Greenpeace, were basically  

    植民地、写真家と私、そしてグリーンピースの他の何人かの人々は、基本的に

  • following the scientists with the caveat that  the scientists can actually go into the penguin  

    科学者の後を追って、科学者が実際にペンギンの中に入ることができるという条件で

  • colonies, and we have to stay on the outside  not to cause too much disturbance to the colony.

    コロニーに迷惑をかけないように、外側にいなければならないのです。

  • [BENSON] It's very weather dependent. And everything shifts  very, very quickly in Antarctica. So it's a it's a  

    天候に大きく左右されます。そして、南極ではすべてが非常に早く変化します。ですから、それはそれは

  • matter of safety, really, like how safely can we get  people ashore and safe? And if something happens,  

    安全の問題、本当に、いかに安全に人を上陸させて安全にするかというようなことです。そして、もし何かが起こったら。

  • can we get them off in time. So, I think the key  thing for us doing this was to have enough time  

    そのためには、十分な時間が必要です。だから、今回の取り組みで重要だったのは、十分な時間を確保することだったと思います。

  • really to give dedicated time for the scientists  to account because normally they have a very short  

    通常、科学者の説明時間は非常に短いので、説明のための時間を確保するためです。

  • period of time. So counting Elephant Island  took 11 days in total, that counting takes  

    の期間が必要です。だから、エレファント・アイランドをカウントするには、合計で11日かかったことになります。

  • a substantial amount of time, actually, because  every single penguin is counted three times. So  

    実際には、1羽のペンギンが3回カウントされるので、かなりの時間がかかります。だから

  • they don't count the grown up penguins, they count  the penguin chicks. So the little young ones, and  

    大人のペンギンではなく、ペンギンのヒナを数えるのです。だから、小さな若い子たち、そして

  • it's also quite interesting, because you have to  do that when they when they're still in the nest.  

    巣の中にいるときにそれをしなければならないというのは、とても興味深いことです。

  • Because once they get a bit older, they start  moving around. And then this task is basically  

    なぜなら、少し大きくなると動き回るようになるからです。そして、このタスクは基本的に

  • impossible, but they were very, very quick. So  when I actually tried once to help them to count  

    しかし、彼らはとても、とても速いのです。だから、実際に一度、数えるのを手伝おうとしたら

  • some, some penguins, and I counted very few and  they counted very many, I was not very correct.  

    ペンギンの数は、私はとても少なく、彼らはとても多く数えていましたが、私はあまり正しくありませんでした。

  • And they were very correct. It's a very special  skill that they have learned over the years.  

    そして、彼らはとても正しかった。彼らが長年かけて習得した特別なスキルです。

  • [BENSON] So elephant Island belongs to a distinct planning  area of Antarctica and our face divided into  

    エレファント・アイランドは、南極大陸の明確な計画地域に属しており、我々の顔は以下のように分かれています。

  • two separate planning areas. And this  is what is referred to to the main one  

    2つの独立したプランニングエリア。そして、これがメインに参照されるのは

  • planning area, there are  ongoing conversations about  

    計画地域では、以下のような会話が行われています。

  • establishing a very protected area in that  area, which encompasses elephant Island,  

    エレファント島を含むその地域に、非常に保護されたエリアを確立する。

  • and there are conversations ongoing on sort  of what does it mean, what we have found  

    そして、それが何を意味するのか、我々が発見したことは何なのか、というような会話が続いています。

  • so that decline of chinstrap penguins elephant Island, and what kind of management  

    象島でのチンパンジーの減少は、どのような管理をすればよいのでしょうか?

  • consequences should that have. So even if there's  nothing that has happened more than that, we've  

    それがどのような結果をもたらすのか。そのため、それ以上のことが起きていなくても、私たちは

  • seen more scientific evidence that like change is  happening in Antarctica, and it's happening fast.

    南極で変化が起きていること、そしてそれが急速に進行していることを示す科学的証拠が増えました。

  • [VAN ROUVEROY] I guess, one piece of advice, which is a bit  of a cliche, but I mean, in this day and age,  

    一つだけアドバイスをさせてください。ちょっと陳腐な言い方ですが、今の時代には

  • when technology is so accessible, and it's  easier, it's become easier to shoot film,  

    テクノロジーがこれほど身近になり、より簡単になったことで、フィルムを撮影することが容易になりました。

  • shoot, what's really king in more now than in  the past is a story that we were lucky here  

    しかし、昔よりも今の方が、「ここにいてよかった」という話が主流になってきているように思います。

  • that there was a very clear and very good storyThe other thing I always tell people is to really  

    それは、非常に明確で優れたストーリーがあったからです。 私がいつも皆さんにお伝えしていることは、本当に

  • think about the target audience because I thinkyou know, we're with environmental filmmaking  

    私たちは環境保護を目的とした映画制作を行っているので、ターゲットとなる観客について考えてみました。

  • with wildlife filmmaking with I think beyond  the stage of just raising awareness. I think  

    ワイルドライフの映像制作は、単に認知度を上げるという段階を超えていると思います。私は

  • most people on this planet are aware of  what's happening, maybe we're in

    この地球上のほとんどの人が、何が起きているかを認識しているのですから、もしかしたら私たちは

  • the next phase really where we need to act, because  it's really 5 to 12, well past 12 now, and in order  

    次の段階で本当に行動を起こす必要があるのは、実際には5~12時、今は12時をはるかに過ぎていますが、そのためには

  • to be effective with a film, you really need to  think about where your films going to be seen.  

    映画の効果を上げるためには、映画がどこで見られるかを考える必要があります。

  • And that that may be a massive audience. That  always helps. But it could also just be a very  

    そして、それは膨大な数の視聴者がいるかもしれないということ。それはいつも助けになります。しかし、それは単に非常に

  • targeted group of politicians, policymakers or  other people who can influence the situation.

    対象となるのは、政治家や政策立案者など、状況に影響を与えることができる人たちのグループです。

  • [BENSON] Yeah, I think anyone who watches this film is  that of other films about the environment. I  

    この映画を見る人は、環境に関する他の映画を見たことがあると思います。I

  • think what's important to take with you is like  everything you do counts. Because sometimes we  

    あなたが持っていくべき大切なものは、あなたの行動すべてが重要であるように思います。なぜなら、私たちは時々

  • think that we have to do so much but I like from  from my side, but I said, you know, it's like  

    しかし、私は私の側から見ても好きなのですが、私が言ったのは、まるで