Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Sometimes nature is obvious and it's designand other times not so much. Patterns cover this  

    自然が明らかにデザインであることもあれば、そうでないこともあります。パターンはこれをカバーする

  • entire planet. And while they may seem like random  designs that can actually reveal quite a lot,  

    地球全体の一見、無造作に見えるデザインですが、実は多くのことがわかるのです。

  • based on the work of famous mathematician Alan  Turing scientists have created the emerging field  

    著名な数学者であるアラン・チューリングの研究に基づいて、科学者たちは新しい分野を生み出しました。

  • of mathematical biology. And in this next filmwe see how scientists are using this technique  

    の数理生物学です。そして次のフィルムでは、科学者たちがこの技術をどのように使っているかを見ることができます。

  • to unveil the hidden realm of patterns, with the  ultimate goal of harnessing them to save species  

    パターンの隠された領域を明らかにし、それを利用して種を保存することを究極の目標としています。

  • across the world. Make sure you stick around after  the credits for a short q&a with the filmmakers.  

    世界各地でクレジットの後には、フィルムメーカーとの短い質疑応答がありますので、ぜひご覧ください。

  • And now from Producer Cristina  Ceuca. This is "A Natural Code."

    そして、プロデューサーのCristina Ceucaから。これは "A Natural Code "です。

  • We live in a universe of patternsEvery night, stars move across the sky.

    私たちはパターンの宇宙に住んでいます。 毎晩、空には星が動いています。

  • No two snowflakes are ever the sameintricate waves move across the oceans.  

    雪の結晶はひとつとして同じものはありません。海には複雑な波があります。

  • The wind creates ripples in sand.  

    風が砂の上に波紋を作る。

  • Nature's love for patterns extends into the  animal kingdom with a multitude of designs.

    自然界の模様好きは、動物界にも及んでいて、さまざまなデザインがある。

  • All of these patterns seem disconnected. But  what if they weren't? My name is Natasha Allison.  

    これらのパターンは、すべてバラバラに見えます。でも、もしそうでなかったら?私の名前はナターシャ・アリソンです。

  • This is a story about how we can use  maths to understand more about nature.  

    これは、数学を使って自然についてより深く理解することができるというストーリーです。

  • To try and help endangered  species throughout the world.

    世界の絶滅危惧種を助けるために。

  • People have never really thought about  how did the animal get its coat markings?  

    その動物がどのようにしてその毛並みを得たのか、人々は考えたことがないのではないだろうか。

  • Why does this animal have one coat? Why  does that another coat? Can we understand

    なぜこの動物は1枚のコートを持っているのか?なぜその別の被毛があるのか?私たちが理解できるのは

  • that? There was one person who wrote a theory  that gave us a whole new way of seeing nature,  

    あれ?自然を見るための全く新しい方法を与えてくれる理論を書いた人がいました。

  • he was able to see that seemingly different  patterns might not be that different at all.  

    一見違うように見えるパターンでも、実はそんなに違わないということがわかったのです。

  • His name was Alan Turing.  

    彼の名前はアラン・チューリング。

  • Alan Turing may be best known  for decrypting German messages  

    アラン・チューリングは、ドイツ語のメッセージを解読したことでよく知られている。

  • in World War II. Not only did he save many  lives, and create one of the first computers,  

    は、第二次世界大戦中に多くの命を救っただけでなく、最初のコンピュータの一つを作ったのです。

  • he helped us understand patterns in nature.

    彼は、自然界のパターンを理解するのに役立ちました。

  • And it was his thinking about  mathematics in this kind of way,  

    そして、彼がこのような方法で数学を考えていたことです。

  • that made him behind the first kinds  of mathematical biology research.  

    このようにして、彼は数理生物学研究の最初の種類の背後にいたのです。

  • The whole area of mathematical biology is about  understanding nature more using mathematics.  

    数理生物学の分野は、数学を使って自然をより深く理解しようとするものです。

  • Alan Turing wrote that patterns in nature perform  due to the reaction and spread of two chemicals.  

    アラン・チューリングは、自然界のパターンは2つの化学物質の反応と拡散によって行われると書いている。

  • These chemicals are called an  activator, and an inhibitor.  

    これらの化学物質は、アクチベーターとインヒビターと呼ばれています。

  • The activator encourages production of itselfwhilst the inhibitor slows the production of the  

    活性化剤は自分自身の生成を促し、阻害剤は自分自身の生成を遅らせます。

  • activator. Showing both some special mathematical  conditions for this process to produce patterns,  

    アクティベーターです。このプロセスがパターンを生成するための特別な数学的条件を両方とも示しています。

  • such as spots and stripes. We could explain  this using an analogy of fires and firefighters.  

    斑点や縞模様のように。これを火事と消防士に例えて説明することができます。

  • If we imagine a really dry forest, so dry, that  fires are likely to randomly break out. We could  

    もし、本当に乾燥した森を想像してみてください。あまりにも乾燥しているので、火災がランダムに発生しそうです。私たちは

  • prevent this by spreading firefighters across  the forest, waiting for the fires to appear.  

    これを防ぐために、消防隊員を森の中に分散させ、火災の発生を待ちます。

  • You can think of the firefighters as the  inhibitor chemical, stopping the activating  

    消防隊員は、活性化している化学物質を止めるための抑制剤と考えることができます。

  • fires producing more of themselves and  spreading out too far. As we predicted,  

    火災がさらに発生し、拡大しすぎている。私たちが予測したように

  • fires break up. Now if the firefighters spread  much faster than the fires, they were able to stop  

    火が消える。さて、消防隊員が火事よりもはるかに早く広がった場合、彼らは阻止するために

  • the production and the spread of the fires. Which  leaves burn patches or sparks across the forest.  

    火の発生と拡散の原因となる。森の中に燃えカスや火の粉を残します。

  • That's how Turing patterns are created.

    それがチューリング・パターンの作り方です。

  • One of the things that this theory of cheering, I  think tells us his route cheering himself because  

    この応援論が教えてくれることのひとつは、彼のルートが自分を応援するのは

  • it shows just what a far reaching and  inquiring and inventive mind he had.

    それは、彼がいかに広い範囲に渡って探究心と発明心を持っていたかを示すものです。

  • And the sad thing is he he did this work. He  published his work in 1952 and he died 1954  

    そして悲しいことに、彼はこの仕事をしていた。彼は1952年に作品を発表し、1954年に亡くなりました

  • tragically had he lived. Where would we  know be in terms of our understanding of bio

    彼が生きていたら、悲劇的なことになっていたでしょう。バイオの理解という点では、私たちはどうなっていたでしょうか。

  • But we can learn so much more from him.  

    しかし、私たちは彼から多くのことを学ぶことができます。

  • Researchers have used Turing theory to describe  how many things in the world get that pattern.  

    研究者たちはチューリング理論を用いて、世の中の多くのものがそのパターンを得ることを説明しました。

  • We can see Turing patterns everywhere. From  a zebra stripes to a cheetah spots to the  

    チューリング・パターンはどこにでも見られます。シマウマの縞模様からチーターの斑点、そして

  • goosebumps on our skin, it's also been used to  understand more about how animals use their space.  

    私たちの肌に鳥肌が立つように、動物がどのように空間を利用しているのかを理解するためにも使われています。

  • For example, in my research, I study how birds  move and why they live in the ranges and the  

    例えば、私の研究では、鳥がどのように移動するのか、なぜ生息しているのかを範囲や

  • territories that they live in. And instead of  chemicals, we look at the location of the animal,  

    彼らの住むテリトリー。そして化学物質の代わりに動物の位置を見ます。

  • and the things that drive these  sensitive chemicals reacting together,  

    と、これらの敏感な化学物質を反応させる原動力となるものがあります。

  • our animal behaviors, such as an animal moving  away from scent marks or moving towards its den,  

    例えば、動物が匂いのついた場所から離れたり、巣穴に向かって移動したりと、動物の行動を観察します。

  • or maybe moving towards prey. If we  understand why animals move in a certain way,  

    獲物に向かっているのかもしれません。動物がなぜ特定の動きをするのかを理解すれば

  • maybe we can understand how best to protect themWhen humans are changing their habitat, so much  

    私たちは、彼らを守るための最善の方法を理解できるかもしれません。 人間が彼らの生息地を変えてしまうと、多くの

  • could be used Turing theory to try and help  endangered species throughout the world.

    チューリング理論を使って、世界中の絶滅危惧種を助けることができるかもしれません。

  • When you have an encounter with a sharkif you look at it from the top, you just  

    サメと遭遇したとき、上から見ると、ただの

  • look at it, it seems like stars moving through  the water just gliding so effortlessly. And it's  

    眺めていると、まるで星が水の中を軽やかに移動しているように見えます。そして、それは

  • it's like looking at a constellation it's  just really beautiful patterns of the whale  

    まるで星座を見ているような......本当に美しいクジラの模様です。

  • shark. Very interesting in that they these unique  patterns form the sharks individual spot pattern,  

    サメ。これらのユニークなパターンがサメの個々のスポットパターンを形成しているという点で非常に興味深い。

  • and this unique spot pattern can be used  to then identify each individual shark.  

    このユニークなスポットパターンから、それぞれのサメを識別することができます。

  • The whale shark research program is  an NGO that works in the Maldives to  

    ジンベエザメ調査プログラムは、モルディブで活動するNGOが

  • consult whale sharks in the area through  research and community mobilization.  

    調査と地域社会の動員により、この地域のジンベエザメの調査を行う。

  • On our daily whale shark service, we go out on  the reef on the south area marine protected area.  

    毎日のジンベイザメサービスでは、南側の海洋保護区のリーフに出ます。

  • We take identification shots from the left  side, the right side and the top of the shark.  

    サメの左側、右側、上側から識別用の写真を撮ります。

  • And then we run it through a software called  Atreus which is linked to the database,  

    そして、それをデータベースと連動しているAtreusというソフトウェアに通します。

  • and it gives us the closest matches to the shock  and then we are able to know which shark we saw.

    その結果、衝撃に最も近いものが表示され、どのサメを見たのかを知ることができるのです。

  • Once the research team has a picture of a whale  shark, they use the spot pattern from the picture  

    研究チームはジンベイザメの写真を手に入れると、その写真に写っているスポットパターンを利用します。

  • to decide which individual is and they use  a mathematical algorithm developed by NASA  

    を決定するために、NASAが開発した数学的アルゴリズムを使用しています。

  • to decide the individual based on  the distance between all the spots.

    を使って、すべてのスポット間の距離に基づいて個人を決定することができます。

  • So just by looking at these  spots, and patterns, we can then  

    つまり、これらのスポットやパターンを見るだけでも

  • recognize a whole lot more  about each individual shot.

    一枚一枚の写真に、より多くの価値を見出すことができます。

  • Collecting information about each individual whale  shark can help with understanding the movements of  

    ジンベエザメの個々の情報を集めることで、ジンベエザメの動きを理解するのに役立ちます。

  • the shark, the geographical range of the sharkeven information about the lifespan of the shark,  

    サメ、サメの地理的範囲、サメの寿命の情報まで。

  • and help create protected areasthese endangered elusive creatures.

    そして、この絶滅の危機に瀕した生物の保護区を作る手助けをします。

  • One example would be in helping us create  marine protected areas for the whale sharks,  

    例えば、ジンベエザメのための海洋保護区の設立に協力することです。

  • the South area marine protected area has been  

    南部地域の海洋保護区には

  • created with the use of data collected  mostly through photo identification.

    主に顔写真を使って収集したデータを使って作成されています。

  • We can use this data the team collected to be  able to write a mathematical model, which will  

    チームが集めたこのデータを使って、数学的なモデルを書くことができます。

  • help us predict the whale sharks population in the  world, which at the moment, we don't even have an  

    世界のジンベエザメの生息数を予測するのに役立ちます。

  • estimation for we could find out more about why  the whale sharks prefer to swim according to  

    推定では、ジンベエザメがなぜ、次のように泳ぐことを好むのかを知ることができました。

  • different variables that the team collected, such  as temperature, wind speed, or current direction.

    チームが収集した温度、風速、流れの方向などのさまざまな変数。

  • All of this from being able to identify them  

    これらはすべて、彼らを識別することができるからです。

  • using that beautiful pattern. And it's  not just the well short research program.  

    その美しいパターンを使ってまた、ウェルショートの研究プログラムだけではありません。

  • Organizations are now running projects of  jaguars and zebras to identify individuals  

    現在、ジャガーやシマウマの個体識別プロジェクトを行っている団体があります。

  • using their patterns. Thanks to Turing patterns  in nature are beginning to reveal their secrets.  

    そのパターンを使ってチューリングのおかげで、自然界のパターンはその秘密を明らかにし始めています。

  • He's shown us how to create  patterns we see in nature.  

    自然界に見られるパターンをどうやって作るかを教えてくれました。

  • And we've seen such an interesting way of  using them. If identifying individuals using  

    そして、そのような面白い使い方をしています。を使って個人を特定すると、それが

  • that pattern, has already had such a positive  effect on the conservation of whale sharks  

    そのパターンは、すでにジンベイザメの保護に大きな効果をもたらしています。

  • by creating the marine protected areawhat else can we do? How much more  

    海洋保護区を作ることで、他に何ができるのか?どれだけ多くの

  • does Turing's theory have to give? And where else  can we use it to understand more about our world

    チューリングの理論は、何を与えてくれるのでしょうか?そして、私たちの世界をより理解するために、他にどこでそれを使うことができるのか

  • Now what inspired this filmLet's talk to the filmmakers.

    さて、この映画のきっかけは何だったのでしょうか? 製作者に話を聞いてみよう。

  • Kriss Ceuca. I'm the filmmaker  from "A Natural Code."

    Kriss Ceucaです。"A Natural Code "の映画監督です。

  • I'm Dr. Natasha Ellison, and I'm a mathematical  ecologist from the University of Sheffield.

    私はシェフィールド大学の数理生態学者、ナターシャ・エリソン博士と申します。

  • Finding the idea for a natural code was  mostly Natasha, because this brilliant,  

    ナチュラルコードのアイデアを見つけたのは、ほとんどがナターシャでしたが、これは素晴らしいものでした。

  • brilliant introduction into mathematical  ecology has everything to do with Natasha.

    マスマティカル・エコロジーの素晴らしさを紹介したのは、すべてナターシャに関係しています。

  • So, yeah, I was very lucky to meet Kriss. I've  been studying this kind of mathematics for a  

    だからね、クリスに会えたのはとてもラッキーだった。私は、この種の数学を研究していることで

  • while now. And I always wanted to place to show  it to the general public. And when I met Kriss,  

    今のうちにそして、それを一般の方にお見せする場所が欲しいとずっと思っていました。そして、Krisに出会ったとき。

  • she was so interested and she had so  many ideas about how to make this film,  

    彼女はとても興味を持ってくれて、この映画をどうやって作るかについてたくさんのアイデアを持っていました。

  • bring whale sharks into it, for  example. It's all Kriss' idea.  

    ジンベエザメを持ち込むなどして全てはKrissのアイデアです。

  • So yeah, I got really lucky that that we were able  to make this together. And Kriss was so creative.

    そうそう、この作品を一緒に作ることができたのは、本当にラッキーでした。そして、クリスはとてもクリエイティブでした。

  • So it began when I was studying my masters in  mathematics. And I came across a paper by Alan  

    始まりは、私が数学の修士課程を勉強していたときでした。そして、Alanの論文に出会いました

  • Turing, which the film mentions, and lots of other  scientists have been studying it for years. And,  

    映画の中でも触れられているチューリングをはじめ、多くの科学者が何年もかけて研究してきました。と。

  • and I think this whole thing attractive about  animal patterns isn't the leopards and zebras  

    動物の模様が魅力的なのは、ヒョウやシマウマではありません。

  • and things that really, really makes us want  to know more about them. And because I was a  

    と、本当に、もっと知りたいと思わせるものがあります。そして、私が

  • mathematician, and there was mathematics  behind this, it was just so interesting.

    数学者がいて、その裏には数学があって、それがとても面白かった。

  • I know, it's even if it's a 10 minute documentaryit involved a lot of people collaborating, to be  

    10分程度のドキュメンタリーであっても、多くの人の協力があってこそのものですよね。

  • able to tell the story. So we collaborated with  a visual artists as well, for the patterns that  

    は、ストーリーを伝えることができます。そこで、私たちはビジュアル・アーティストとも協力して、そのパターンを

  • were created, they are actually touring patterns  that you can see on the screen for the visuals,  

    が作られたとき、それらは実際にツアーのパターンであり、ビジュアルのためにスクリーンで見ることができます。

  • we also included some of the underwater  footage that we filmed in the Maldives  

    モルディブで撮影した水中映像も収録しました。

  • with the whale sharks, they were done  in collaboration with the Maltese  

    ジンベエザメとの共同作業は、マルタの

  • whale shark research program, that they are  working tirelessly from the boat every day,  

    ジンベエザメの調査プログラムでは、毎日船の上から精力的に活動していること。

  • with volunteers. And with citizen science as  well. They've developed an app that was based,  

    ボランティアとまた、市民科学も活用しています。ベースにしたアプリを開発したそうです。

  • similar to the NASA algorithm to identify the  stars to identify individual whale sharks. So  

    星を識別するNASAのアルゴリズムと同じように、ジンベイザメの個体を識別することができます。そこで

  • that was an amazing collaboration that we were  able to do because it was in a way, showing how  

    このような素晴らしいコラボレーションができたのは、ある意味では、いかにして

  • science communication can- and science- can  can help endangered species around the world.

    サイエンス・コミュニケーションは、世界の絶滅危惧種を救うことができます。

  • Something I'm working on now is is a project  with primary schools. So that's ages, age,  

    今取り組んでいるのは、小学校を対象としたプロジェクトです。つまり、年齢、年齢ですね。

  • like nine to 10, where what we're trying to  sort of show they're about Turing patterns,  

    9から10のように、私たちが見せようとしているのは、チューリング・パターンに関するものです。

  • in the hope that you know, when they get into  the high school, and when they go on to study,  

    高校に入ってからも、進学してからも、そのようなことを期待しています。

  • if they do that, they'd be interested  in doing maths, and then, you know,  

    そうすれば、子供たちは数学に興味を持つようになるでしょうし、そうすれば、ほら。

  • we can push that sort of research area  forward. So I guess that's one of the most  

    このような研究分野を推し進めることができます。これが最も重要なことの1つだと思います。

  • important things that the film is inspiring  younger people into these kind of areas.

    この映画は、若い人たちがこのような分野に興味を持つきっかけとなることが重要です。

  • For me, I have another wildlife  bill project coming up. So it'll be  

    私の場合は、もう一つの野生動物法案のプロジェクトが控えています。だから、それは

  • shorter, a longer version of it'll be  about 20 to 30 minutes. And it'll be about  

    短くても、長くても、20分から30分くらいです。そして、それは約

  • like Transylvania forest. It'll be  about deforestation and habitat loss.  

    トランシルバニアの森のような森林破壊や生息地の喪失をテーマにしたものになります。

  • And also plants to like recover from  that. So how are young people involved  

    そして、そこから回復するための植物も。若い人たちはどのように関わっているのでしょうか?

  • into reforestation projects in Transylvaniathat's, that's the new project coming up.

    トランシルバニア州の森林再生プロジェクトに参加していますが、これは新しいプロジェクトです。

  • As a scientist, who you know, has, I have limited  filmmaking experience or anything, nothing? Well,  

    科学者である私には、映画製作の経験などほとんどありませんが、何か?まあね。

  • I've not made a film before myself. But finding  people like Chris to promote your research and  

    私自身、映画を作ったことはありません。しかし、クリスのような人を見つけて、自分の研究を宣伝したり

  • be able to creatively show people, your ideas of  science is really important. You know, I could  

    あなたの科学に対する考えを、創造的に人々に示すことができるかどうかは、とても重要です。ほら、私は

  • have sat down for months and months and learned  it myself. But that's, that's not helpful. It's  

    は、何ヶ月もかけて自分で勉強してきました。しかし、それでは役に立ちません。それは

  • helpful to go and seek out filmmakers and seek out  people that you're going to be able to work with.

    そのためには、映画監督を探したり、一緒に仕事ができそうな人を探したりすることが大切です。

  • And as Chris mentioned, in a previous  answer, to collaborate with people,  

    また、前の回答でクリスが言っていたように、人々と協力し合うこと。

  • these collaborations are really importantIf there's like any advice for upcoming  

    このようなコラボレーションはとても重要です。 これから参加される方に何かアドバイスがありましたら

  • science communicators or filmmakers, is I thinkremember why you're doing it. So every time  

    科学コミュニケーターや映画製作者は、「なぜそれをするのか」ということを忘れてはいけないと思います。ですから、毎回

  • you think maybe you you've lost your way or you  don't know how to do it or how to save better or  

    自分の道を見失っているのではないか、やり方がわからないのではないか、もっと上手に節約する方法がわからないのではないか、と思っています。

  • why is it even worth it or everything is just  remember why you started it and what what's  

    なぜそれが価値のあることなのか、すべてが価値のあることなのか、なぜそれを始めたのか、何が何だかを思い出してください。

  • your passion for it because that's, I  think your biggest tool into science  

    情熱を持つことが、科学への最大のツールだと思います。

  • communication is like people are going to see  your passion for the subject and they want to,  

    のコミュニケーションは、あなたの情熱を人々が見て、そうしたいと思うようなものです。

  • they want to they they will want to learn more  just because they will see that drive and passion  

    その意欲と情熱を見て、もっと学びたいと思うようになります。

  • in your eyes so just always go back to your inner  self when you when you don't know which way to go.

    自分の目で見て、どっちに行けばいいのかわからなくなったら、常に自分の内面に立ち返ればいいのです。

  • Doesn't this just make you want to get outside  and discover patterns in the nature around you?  

    これを見ると、外に出て自然の中にあるパターンを発見したくなりませんか?

  • Thanks for watching Seeker Indie's premiere have  "A Natural Code." It's stories like these that  

    シーカー・インディーズのプレミア番組「A Natural Code」をご覧いただきありがとうございます。このようなストーリーがあるからこそ

  • can inspire more discoveries, more adventures and  new ideas that may one day help save our planet.

    は、より多くの発見、より多くの冒険、そしていつの日か地球を救うかもしれない新しいアイデアを刺激することができます。

Sometimes nature is obvious and it's designand other times not so much. Patterns cover this  

自然が明らかにデザインであることもあれば、そうでないこともあります。パターンはこれをカバーする

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 パターン 数学 サメ 動物 自然 研究

私たちの世界は秘密のパターンに支配されていると科学者が発見|自然の暗号 (Scientists Find Our World Could Be Ruled By Secret Patterns | A Natural Code)

  • 4 1
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 03 月 29 日
動画の中の単語