Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • I don't know.

    知る由もありません。

  • I grew up in Atlanta, Georgia, and I didn't know very many white people.

    ジョージア州アトランタで育った私は、白人をあまり知りませんでした。

  • But I was raised in the Southern Black Church that was under the shadow of white supremacy and run by black people who in many ways we're taught to hate themselves.

    しかし、私は白人至上主義の影に隠れていた南部の黒人教会で育ち、様々な意味で自分自身を憎むように教えられている黒人によって運営されていました。

  • The generation that raised me was still familiar with lynchings.

    自分を育ててくれた世代は、まだリンチに慣れ親しんでいた。

  • So in order to not be murdered by racist, some of the black people in the generation before me learn to make themselves smaller.

    だから、人種差別主義者に殺されないために、前の世代の黒人の中には、自分を小さくすることを学ぶ人もいる。

  • We couldn't be too loud, too smart, two attractive to bold.

    派手すぎず、スマートすぎず、魅力的な2人から大胆な2人にはなれませんでした。

  • On some level, they felt like anything that we did that made us stand out might get us murdered.

    あるレベルでは、私たちが目立ったことをしたら、殺されるかもしれないと感じていました。

  • In the midst of that, I emerged this straight, a student who wrapped, left without Yankovic and read comic books.

    そんな中、私はこのストレート、ラップをしてヤンコビッチ抜きで出て、漫画を読んでいた学生が出てきました。

  • So much for not standing out.

    目立たないようにするために

  • So the grownups around me regularly discouraged my artistry to them comic books with the pursuit of a kid who didn't really understand the world.

    だから私の周りの大人たちは定期的に私の芸術性を本当に世界を理解していない子供の追求で彼らに漫画を落胆させた。

  • They told me that art was silly and I was in for some hard lessons about the real world.

    芸術はバカげていると言われ、現実世界の厳しいレッスンを受けることになりました。

  • Back then, I only had one other friend who was in the comic books, and he went to a different school.

    当時は漫画の友達は他に一人しかいなくて、その友達は別の学校に行っていました。

  • So when I was around 11, he and I went to our very first comic book convention.

    私が11歳の時、彼と私は初めての漫画大会に行きました。

  • They were so unused to seeing black kids there that one grown white man mistook me for security and show me his convention badge in order to get in.

    彼らは黒人の子供を見慣れていなかったので、一人の白人の大人が私を警備員と勘違いして、中に入るために大会のバッジを見せてくれました。

  • Remember, I was 11, but me and my friend love these conventions.

    覚えていてください、私は11歳でしたが、私と私の友人はこれらの大会を愛しています。

  • Finally, we had other people to talk to about the important questions like Why does the Hulk always wear purple pants?

    最後に、他にも「なぜハルクはいつも紫色のパンツを履いているのか」「なぜハルクはいつも紫色のパンツを履いているのか」などの重要な質問をしてもらいました。

  • About a year or so later, with every free moment that we had, me and that same friend were actively drawing comic books.

    それから1年ほど経った頃、暇な時間を見つけては、私とその同じ友人が積極的に漫画を描いていました。

  • His father took notice of this, and he sat us down in their living room.

    父親はそれに気付き、私たちをリビングに座らせてくれました。

  • He loved us both, and he decided it was time to set us straight.

    彼は私たち二人を愛していて、私たちを正す時が来たと判断したのです。

  • He said, It's great that you to love these comic books, but you need to pick a serious profession, something that's going to take care of you and your families, and you're not gonna be able to do that with comic books.

    漫画が好きなのはいいけど、自分や家族の面倒を見てくれるような真面目な職業を選ばないと、漫画ではそれができないと言っていました。

  • My friend's father wasn't trying to hurt us.

    友人の父親は私たちを傷つけようとしていませんでした。

  • He was trying to prepare us for the world, and underneath that was this fear that was shared by my own parents that being a black artist would make me stand out and that I might be murdered by racist.

    彼は私たちに世界の準備をさせようとしていたのですが、その下には、黒人アーティストであることで自分が目立ってしまい、人種差別主義者に殺されてしまうのではないかという、実の両親が共有していたこの恐怖がありました。

  • And it's not like that was a far jump.

    しかも、それが遠距離ジャンプだったわけでもないし。

  • My parents were born in the early fifties, 1955 a white woman accused of 14 year old boy of whistling at her.

    私の両親は50年代前半、1955年に14歳の少年に口笛を吹いたと告発された白人女性が生まれました。

  • He was black, and two grown white men brutally murdered him just for her accusation.

    彼は黒人で、二人の大人の白人男性が彼女を非難しただけで彼を残忍に殺害した。

  • These men never went to prison.

    この人たちは刑務所には行かなかった

  • The boy's name was Emmett Till.

    男の子の名前はエメット・ティル。

  • So my parents grew up in a time where just the accusation of whistling at a white woman could get a black boy brutally murdered.

    白人女性に口笛を吹いただけで黒人の少年が残忍に殺されるような時代に両親は育ったんですね。

  • So why wouldn't they be concerned about me standing out a some bohemian, artsy dude so as a black artist have had to ask myself, when the world seems like it's burning?

    だから、なぜ彼らは私がいくつかのボヘミアン、芸術的な男を立っていることを気にしていないだろうか、世界が燃えているように見えるときに、自分自身に尋ねなければならなかったので、黒人アーティストとして?

  • Is art really worth it?

    アートは本当に価値があるのか?

  • I grew up and I worked seriously jobs and did are on the side.

    私は成長して、私は真面目に仕事をして、やったことは副業です。

  • Let me tell you about the most serious job that I ever worked.

    今までで一番真面目に働いていた仕事の話をさせてください。

  • I ran an insurance agency, and I know everything that you've learned about me so far.

    私は保険代理店を経営していて、今までの私のことは全て知っています。

  • Screams insurance agent.

    保険代理店の悲鳴。

  • Predictably, I hated that job.

    予想通り、私はその仕事が嫌いでした。

  • So after a few years, and against all the wise advice I heard in my life, I decided to close my insurance agency and try my hand at writing graphic novels.

    だから数年後、人生で聞いた賢明なアドバイスに反して、保険代理店を閉めて、グラフィック・ノベルの執筆に挑戦することにしたんだ。

  • I wanted toe address, the social issues that I was passionate about.

    私が熱中していた社会問題をつま先で訴えたかったのです。

  • Police brutality, sexism, racism, that kind of thing.

    警察の残虐性、性差別、人種差別、そんな感じです。

  • But to make it clear, I was leaving the serious insurance job in order to pursue writing comic books.

    しかし、はっきり言って、私は漫画を書くことを追求するために、真面目な保険の仕事を辞めようとしていました。

  • You know, art, which is silly, especially in the face of a world that seemed dedicated to murdering me.

    芸術なんて馬鹿げてるよな特に俺を殺すことに専念しているように見えた世界に直面してな

  • This was 2016, and there was this reality show host running for president.

    これは2016年のことで、大統領選に出馬しているリアリティ番組の司会者がいました。

  • You guys probably never heard of him.

    お前らも聞いたことないだろうが

  • But there are all these disturbing things arising in the world.

    しかし、世界にはこれらの不穏なことがすべて生じている。

  • Nazis air Feeling bolder, people are feeling less shame about their racism.

    ナチスの空気 大胆さを感じ、人々は人種差別について恥ずかしさを感じなくなってきている。

  • Hate crimes arising In response, my black and brown friends organized public protests and boycotts.

    ヘイトクライムの発生 これに呼応して、私の黒人と褐色の友人たちは公共の抗議行動やボイコットを組織した。

  • Ah, lot of my liberal white friends were marching on the capital every weekend, and I I wanted to write a comic book.

    リベラルな白人の友人たちが毎週末首都でデモ行進をしていたので漫画を書きたかったんです

  • Was it being silly?

    バカにしてたのかな?

  • Vain?

    虚しい?

  • I never made a living off of our before, and now I just quit my job when it seemed like the world was falling apart.

    今まではそれで生計を立てていなかったのに、世界が崩壊しそうな時に仕事を辞めてしまったんです。

  • Artists silly right.

    芸術家のおバカな右。

  • I struggle with this for a while, so I took a month to travel in the U.

    しばらくこれに苦戦していたので、1ヶ月かけてアメリカ旅行に行ってきました。

  • K for the first time.

    初めてのK。

  • I was nervous about this trip because I was traveling alone and I didn't know how people in these countries felt about black people.

    今回の旅行は一人旅だったので緊張しましたし、これらの国の人たちが黒人に対してどのような気持ちを持っているのかもわからなかったです。

  • But I went to Berlin, Prague, Budapest and this tiny British town called Milk Shin in Berlin.

    でも、ベルリン、プラハ、ブダペスト、そしてベルリンのミルクシンというイギリスの小さな町に行きました。

  • I sat down with the owner of the biggest comic bookstore chain there, and we talked about how, as a kid, his favorite hero was Captain America.

    最大手のコミック書店チェーンのオーナーに話を聞いて、子供の頃、好きなヒーローはキャプテン・アメリカだったという話をしました。

  • But certain issues that a comic book he never got to read as a kid because Captain America was fighting Nazis in those books and nothing with Nazis was a god in Germany, even if they were getting beat up.

    でも特定の問題は、キャプテン・アメリカがそれらの本でナチスと戦っていて、ナチスとの何もないドイツでは、やられても神だったから、彼が子供の頃に読むことができなかった漫画です。

  • So let's think about that for a moment.

    ということで、ちょっと考えてみましょう。

  • In Germany, Nazis were banished from everything while here in the States, we've erected statues to confederates who betrayed our country.

    ドイツではナチスは全てから追放されたがここアメリカでは国を裏切った連合国人の像を建てている。

  • Anyway, I thought about this man, this comic book fan who grew up in Germany but fell in love with the story of an American icon, and I realized a well written comic book or graphic novel could reach someone all the way across the world, and I thought about revolution.

    とにかく私はこの男のことを考えました ドイツで育った漫画ファンですが アメリカの象徴の物語に恋をしました よく書かれた漫画やグラフィックノベルは 世界中の誰かに届くことができると気付きました そして私は革命について考えました

  • How whenever society needs to change that changes inspired at least in part by the artist thought about how dictators and despots regularly murder and discredit artists.

    どのように社会がどのように独裁者や専制君主が定期的に殺害し、アーティストの信用を落とす方法について考えたアーティストによって少なくとも一部で触発された変更を変更する必要があります。

  • Hitler's people came up with the term specifically to discredit artist degenerate art.

    ヒトラーの人たちは、特に芸術家の退廃芸術を貶めるためにこの言葉を思いついた。

  • They were burning books and paintings.

    本や絵画を燃やしていた

  • But why?

    でも、なぜ?

  • Why were the leaders of the Nazi Party dedicating their attention to destroying art?

    ナチス党の指導者たちはなぜ芸術の破壊に専念していたのでしょうか?

  • If are really has no power?

    本当に力がないのか?

  • If it's really a silly waste of time, then why are dictators afraid of it?

    本当にくだらない無駄遣いだとしたら、なぜ独裁者はそれを恐れるのか。

  • Why would Nazis burning books and paintings?

    なぜナチスは本や絵画を燃やすのか?

  • Why was McCarthy so dedicated toe blacklisting artists in the 19 fifties?

    なぜマッカーシーは50年代にアーティストをブラックリストに載せることに熱心だったのでしょうか?

  • Why was Stalin's government so focused on censoring artist in Russia?

    なぜスターリン政府はロシアで芸術家の検閲に力を入れたのか?

  • Because art scares dictators because they understood something that I've been struggling to understand my entire life.

    芸術が独裁者を怖がらせるのは、私が一生懸命理解しようとしてきたことを理解してくれたからです。

  • Art is powerful.

    芸術は力がある。

  • Art is important.

    芸術は大切です。

  • Art can change hearts and minds all the way across the world.

    アートは世界中の人々の心を変えることができます。

  • In 18 94 Russian author Leo Tolstoy wrote, The Kingdom of God Is Within you.

    18 94年、ロシアの作家レオ・トルストイは「神の国はあなたの中にある」と書いています。

  • It's a book that advocates for non violence.

    非暴力を標榜する本です。

  • In the 19 twenties, Mahatma Gandhi listed Tolstoy's book as one of the three most important influences in his life.

    19 20代のマハトマ・ガンジーは、トルストイの著書を人生で最も影響を受けた三大影響の一つに挙げています。

  • So Tolstoy inspired Gandhi.

    トルストイはガンジーに感化されたのですね。

  • You know, Gandhi inspired Dr Martin Luther King Jr.

    ガンジーがキング牧師に影響を与えたのはご存知の通りです。

  • So how would the civil rights movement in America have changed?

    では、アメリカの公民権運動はどう変わっていたのでしょうか?

  • If Tolstoy had never written his book, would I even be here talking to you now?

    トルストイが本を書かなかったら 今頃ここで話していただろうか?

  • Tolstoy's book made real changes in the world by inspiring people during the civil rights struggle.

    トルストイの本は、民権闘争の中で人々を鼓舞することで、世界を本当の意味で変えていった。

  • Black people would stand hand in hand as police and dogs attacked us, and we think gospel songs, those songs that art inspired these people and it helped them make it through activism is how we change the world and the different ways to engage in activism.

    黒人は警察や犬に襲われても手を取り合って立っていましたし、ゴスペルの歌や、芸術が人々にインスピレーションを与え、それが彼らの活動を助けてくれたと考えています。

  • And for me, that way is art.

    そして、私にとっては、その方法が芸術なのです。

  • So I came back to the States and I wrote about all those issues that I mentioned before.

    それでアメリカに戻ってきて、前に言ったような問題を全部書きました。

  • The police brutality, the sexism, the racism.

    警察の残虐性、性差別、人種差別。

  • Honestly, I didn't know how the world was going to receive it from me.

    正直なところ、世間が自分からどう受け取るのかわからなかった。

  • I just knew that I was tired of giving my life two things that I didn't care about, so I hired a comic book artist.

    どうでもいい2つのことに人生を捧げるのが嫌になって漫画家を雇ったのは知っていただけ。

  • I ran a Kickstarter campaign, and my graphic novel became the burning metronome.

    Kickstarterキャンペーンをやっていて、グラフィックノベルが燃えるメトロノームになったんです。

  • It's a supernatural murder mystery about otherworldly creatures who absorbed magical power from human cruelty.

    人間の残酷さから魔力を吸収した異世界の生物を描いた超自然殺人ミステリーです。

  • They watch human beings, and they give us the chance to choose between compassion and cruelty.

    人間を見ていて、思いやりと残酷さを選択する機会を与えてくれます。

  • In one of the stories of police, Officer has an opportunity to go back and undo a time when he was unnecessarily violent to someone.

    警察の話の中には、お巡りさんが誰かに不必要に暴力を振るわれた時に、元に戻って元に戻す機会があります。

  • So what happened as a result of me writing this book?

    で、この本を書いた結果、何が起きたのか?

  • I was interviewed on TV, news, newspapers.

    テレビ、ニュース、新聞の取材を受けました。

  • The university invited me to teach writing in the Masters program.

    大学に誘われて、マスターズプログラムでライティングを教えることになりました。

  • I'm a professor now, but more importantly, I was able to reach into my heart, pull out the truest parts of my soul and see it have a positive impact on other people's lives.

    今は教授になっていますが、それ以上に、自分の心に届き、魂の真の部分を引き出し、人の人生にプラスの影響を与えているのを見ることができました。

  • I was signing books in this comic book store, and this man made small talk with me for about 20 minutes.

    この漫画屋で本にサインをしていたら、この人が20分くらい世間話をしてくれた。

  • Eventually, he said that my book made him think about how he does his job.

    最終的には、私の本を読んで、自分の仕事のやり方を考えさせられたと言っていました。

  • So, of course, I was asked, What do you do for a living?

    だから当然、「仕事は何をしているのか」と聞かれました。

  • He was a police officer, so my book made a police officer think about how he does this job.

    彼は警察官だったので、私の本を読んで、警察官がこの仕事をどうするかを考えさせられました。

  • That never happened when I sold insurance, alright, comic books and graphic novels for a living.

    私が保険を売っていた時は そんなことはなかった 漫画やグラフィックノベルを売って 生活していた時はね

  • Now I'm a full time artist.

    今ではフルタイムでアーティストとして活動しています。

  • If I hadn't written that book.

    あの本を書いていなければ

  • None of you would be listening to me right now.

    今は誰も私の話を聞いていないだろう。

  • And listen.

    そして、聞いてください。

  • My parents weren't wrong.

    両親は間違っていなかった

  • Toe warned me about the lethal tendencies of this country just last year.

    爪先がこの国の致命的な傾向を警告してくれたのは、ちょうど去年のことだ。

  • Ah, white supremacist sent me death threats over a book that I hadn't even finished writing yet.

    白人至上主義者が私に死の脅迫を送ってきた私がまだ書き終わってもいない本のことで

  • But obviously the only reason he was threatened is because he recognized the power of art to change hearts and minds all the way across the world.

    しかし、明らかに彼が脅されていたのは、世界中の人々の心を変える芸術の力を認めたからに他ならない。

  • So I say to you now, if there's any art you want to create, if there's something in your heart, if you have something to say, we need you now.

    だから今、もしあなたが作りたいアートがあるなら、もしあなたの心に何かがあるなら、言いたいことがあるなら、私たちは今、あなたを必要としていると言います。

  • Your art can be activism.

    あなたの芸術は活動家になれる

  • It can inspire people and change the world.

    人を鼓舞し、世界を変えることができます。

  • If you're afraid, that's okay.

    怖いならそれでいいんだよ。

  • Just don't let it stop.

    止めるなよ

  • You go make art and scare a dictator is are worth it.

    あなたは芸術を作りに行くと独裁者を怖がらせることは、それだけの価値があります。

  • Hell, yeah.

    そうだな

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

I don't know.

知る由もありません。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 TED 芸術 漫画 黒人 白人 ナチス

世界が燃えている時、アートは時間の無駄なのか?| R.アラン・ブルックス (When the world is burning, is art a waste of time? | R. Alan Brooks)

  • 0 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 02 月 18 日
動画の中の単語