Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Transcriber: Leslie Gauthier Reviewer: Joanna Pietrulewicz

    書き手: Leslie Gauthierレビュアー: Leslie Gauthier レビュアー。ジョアンナ・ピエトルウィッツ

  • So I'm a sports and performance psychologist,

    だから、スポーツ心理学とパフォーマンス心理学をやっています。

  • which means I get to work with a lot of people

    多くの人と仕事をすることができる

  • like elite athletes,

    エリートアスリートのように

  • military professionals

    軍人

  • and top government agencies,

    と政府のトップ機関。

  • whose career and safety depend on peak performance.

    そのキャリアと安全性が、ピーク時のパフォーマンスにかかっています。

  • And I'll never forget this one story a soldier told me

    兵士が話してくれたこの話は忘れられない

  • about his time serving in Iraq.

    イラクに従軍していた時のことを

  • It was around the early 2000s

    2000年代前半頃のことです。

  • when the United States had military operations in both Iraq and Afghanistan.

    アメリカがイラクとアフガニスタンの両方で軍事作戦を行っていた時のことです。

  • And during this time,

    そして、この間に

  • many locals were encouraged to come forward

    ばんごうのおばさんが出てきてくれた

  • and share information about potential threats.

    と潜在的な脅威についての情報を共有します。

  • So one day this Iraqi man approaches the gate of a US outpost

    ある日、このイラク人の男がアメリカの前哨地のゲートに近づいた。

  • to share intelligence about a possible threat.

    脅威の可能性についての情報を共有するために

  • But instead of being treated like an ally,

    しかし、味方のように扱われる代わりに

  • he was met with hostility by the soldier who was debriefing him.

    彼は報告を受けていた兵士に敵意を持っていました。

  • But that's likely because just days earlier,

    しかし、それはほんの数日前のことである可能性が高い。

  • soldiers from another unit were killed in a surprise attack.

    別の部隊の兵士が奇襲攻撃で殺害されました。

  • And so as the interview continued, so did the soldier's irritation.

    そして、インタビューが続くにつれ、兵士の苛立ちも増していった。

  • And as a result, the Iraqi man became frustrated.

    その結果、イラク人男性は不満を募らせた。

  • In the end, tempers were flaring so high that the interview was cut short,

    結局、緊張感が高まりすぎて、面接は打ち切られてしまいました。

  • and the following day,

    と次の日のことです。

  • two separate units were hit by roadside bombs.

    別々の2つのユニットが路上爆弾に襲われました。

  • Of course we'll never know for sure if the attacks could have been stopped

    もちろん、攻撃を止めることができたかどうかは分からない。

  • had the interview gone differently,

    面接が違っていたら

  • but the reason why I'm telling you this story

    でも、なぜこの話をするかというと

  • is because it's an excellent example of a supercommon problem

    は超常識的な問題の好例だから

  • that keeps so many of us from performing at our best.

    だからこそ、多くの人が最高のパフォーマンスを発揮できないのです。

  • And it's how well we're able to regulate our emotions,

    そして、いかに感情をうまくコントロールできるかということです。

  • which is one of the most common drivers of a good and bad performance.

    これは性能の良し悪しのドライバーの中でも最も一般的なものです。

  • And it turns out how well you're able to regulate your emotions

    そして、それはあなたがどれだけ感情をコントロールできるかということがわかります。

  • depends on how susceptible you are to a principle called emotional contagion.

    感情の伝染と呼ばれる原理の影響を受けやすいかどうかにかかっています。

  • It's just like it sounds.

    その通りだと思います。

  • It's how quickly you can catch the emotions of other people

    人の気持ちを汲み取るのがいかに早いか

  • and then take them on as your own.

    そして、それを自分のものとして受け止めてください。

  • The problem is though,

    問題は、しかし。

  • most of us are highly susceptible to other people's emotions,

    ほとんどの人は、他人の感情に非常に敏感です。

  • which means even the smallest external factor can impact

    つまり、小さな外部要因でも影響を与えることができるということです。

  • how we perform at work,

    私たちが仕事でどのようにパフォーマンスを発揮するか

  • on the field, and even at home.

    現場でも、家でも。

  • But lucky for us,

    でも、私たちにとってはラッキーなことです。

  • we can learn how to avoid other people's emotions

    人の感情を避ける方法を学べる

  • by becoming better at regulating our own.

    自分自身を規制するのが上手になることで

  • So here's how I like to think about this.

    そこで、私はこう考えています。

  • Take a look.

    見てみてください。

  • Now at a glance, this looks like a giant, teddy bear-looking shrub, right?

    今、一見するとテディベアのような巨大な低木に見えますよね?

  • I remember seeing one of these for the very first time

    初めて見たときは、これを覚えています。

  • while hiking in Arizona,

    アリゾナでのハイキング中に

  • and because it looked soft,

    と柔らかそうに見えたからです。

  • I reached out to touch it.

    手を伸ばして触ってみました。

  • But by the time my hand was close enough,

    しかし、その頃には私の手は十分に近くなっていました。

  • the spines on the branches jumped and pricked me --

    枝のトゲが飛び跳ねて刺さった --

  • literally, my hand was covered.

    文字通り、私の手は覆われていました。

  • And every time I tried to remove one,

    そして、1つを削除しようとするたびに

  • that little sucker would break off

    屁でもないことをしている

  • and it would burrow deeper into my skin,

    そして、それは私の肌に深く入り込んできます。

  • just like the guy in the video.

    動画の男と同じように

  • (Video) Man: Argh!

    (ビデオ)男。ああ!

  • Jessica Woods: And this plant -- it has the perfect name.

    ジェシカ・ウッズですこの植物は...完璧な名前を持っています。

  • It's called the jumping cholla,

    跳びチョラと呼ばれています。

  • and it left a lasting impression --

    印象に残っています --

  • figuratively and literally.

    比喩的にも文字通りにも

  • So much so that when I teach people how to regulate their emotions

    それほどまでに、私は人々に感情をコントロールする方法を教えています。

  • and avoid catching the emotions of other people,

    と他人の感情をキャッチしないようにしましょう。

  • I refer to the "jumping cholla effect."

    "ジャンピングチョーラ効果 "を参考にしています。

  • And over the years,

    そして何年もかけて

  • I have concluded that the jumping chollas are just like people.

    跳びチョラは人間と同じようなものだという結論に達しました。

  • They can be pricks,

    彼らはゲスになることもある。

  • and if you're not careful, they can borrow deep into your skin.

    と、油断していると肌の奥まで借りてしまうことがあります。

  • So to understand how this happens in real life,

    だから、実際の生活の中でどのように起こるのかを理解するために。

  • I think it's helpful to know what emotions actually are.

    実際に感情とは何かを知っておくと役に立つと思います。

  • And there's two popular theories about where emotions come from.

    そして、感情がどこから来るのかについては、よく言われている2つの説があります。

  • The first theory is called cognitive appraisal,

    最初の理論は認知鑑定と呼ばれています。

  • which basically says

    と言ったところで

  • that the experience of an emotion is actually you evaluating

    感情を体験したことが、実は自分の評価であるということ

  • if your current situation aligns with your goals or expectations.

    あなたの現在の状況が、あなたの目標や期待と一致しているかどうか。

  • So let's say you're on your way home to share some exciting news

    帰り道にワクワクするようなニュースがあったとしましょう。

  • with your significant other.

    あなたの大切な人と

  • You walk through the door, you find them sitting on the couch,

    ドアをくぐると ソファに座っています

  • but instead of a hello or "how was your day?"

    "こんにちは "や "今日はどうだった?"の代わりに

  • they leave the room without saying a word.

    何も言わずに部屋を出ていく。

  • Now, that's not how you expected your evening to go,

    今、それはあなたが期待していた夕べとは違うわね。

  • which could lead to the emotion of feeling annoyed.

    イライラするという感情につながる可能性があります。

  • Does that make sense?

    それは意味があるのか?

  • The other theory is called physiological perception,

    もう一つの理論は、生理的知覚と呼ばれています。

  • which is all about the emotions we subconsciously assign

    これは、私たちが無意識のうちに割り当てている感情についてのすべてのものです。

  • to the physical changes in our body.

    私たちの身体の物理的な変化に

  • Public speaking is a great way to understand this.

    パブリック・スピーキングは、これを理解するのに最適な方法です。

  • How perfect, right?

    なんて完璧なんでしょう?

  • Usually, right before I speak I get butterflies in my stomach.

    いつもは話す直前になると胃の中で蝶々が出てくるんです。

  • Now, if I had that same physical feeling the last time I spoke in public

    前回、人前で話した時と同じような身体の感覚を持っていたら

  • and the speech went well,

    とスピーチがうまくいきました。

  • I may interpret that situation or that sensation

    私はその状況や感覚を解釈することがあります。

  • as the emotion of excitement.

    興奮の感情として

  • But let's just say I bombed my last speech.

    でも、最後のスピーチは爆死したと言っておこう。

  • I may now interpret that butterfly feeling as nervousness or fear.

    私は今、その蝶々の感覚を緊張や恐怖と解釈しているのかもしれません。

  • Basically, we overlay our physiological perception

    基本的には、生理的な認識を重ね合わせて

  • from our past experiences

    過去の経験から

  • onto our current situation.

    現在の状況に合わせて

  • And what's interesting is that both of these theories

    そして、興味深いのは、これらの理論の両方が

  • also play into how we assess the emotions of other people.

    また、他人の感情をどのように評価するかにも関わってきます。

  • Because the part of the brain that processes emotion and memory --

    感情や記憶を処理する脳の一部が...

  • the limbic system --

    大脳辺縁系

  • is considered to be an open-loop system,

    はオープンループシステムと考えられています。

  • which means it can be influenced by any external factor.

    つまり、どんな外的要因にも影響されるということです。

  • Think about it:

    考えてみてください。

  • have you ever passed by someone,

    あなたは誰かとすれ違ったことがありますか?

  • and without saying a word,

    と何も言わずに言っています。

  • you could feel how annoyed or how excited they were?

    相手がどれだけイライラしていたか、どれだけ興奮していたかが伝わってきたのではないでしょうか?

  • And then maybe you felt annoyed or excited too.

    そして、あなたもイライラしたり、興奮したりしたのではないでしょうか。

  • It's an interesting concept to think about,

    考えてみると面白いコンセプトですね。

  • because our brains are hardwired

    私たちの脳はハードワイヤードされているから

  • to pick up these subtle cues in our environment,

    私たちの環境でこれらの微妙な合図を拾うために。

  • which makes it possible for the other person's emotions

    相手の感情を可能にする

  • to jump and attach to you.

    にジャンプしてくっついてきます。

  • But what many people don't realize

    しかし、多くの人が気づいていないのは

  • is that every human being is affected by our open-loop system.

    それは、すべての人間が、私たちのオープンループシステムの影響を受けているということです。

  • Many people at work or many people on the same team

    職場の人が多い、または同じチームの人が多い

  • inevitably catch feelings from one another,

    必然的にお互いの感情をキャッチしあう。

  • sharing everything from jealousy to envy and worry to joy.

    嫉妬から羨望、心配から喜びまで、すべてを共有しています。

  • The more cohesive the group, the stronger the sharing of moods.

    集団の結束力が強ければ強いほど、気分の共有化が図られます。

  • And we see this play out in sports all the time.

    そして、スポーツの世界ではいつもこのプレイアウトを目にします。

  • And sometimes even in a good way,

    時には良い意味でも

  • like if the team is getting beat

    叩かれても仕方がない

  • but the captain regulates his or her emotions

    艦長は感情を制御する

  • and stays grounded and present,

    そして、地に足がついたまま、現在にとどまっています。

  • that can increase the likelihood

    可能性が高くなる

  • that the rest of the team will stay grounded and present as well --

    チームの残りのメンバーが地に足をつけて存在感を保つことができるように--。

  • which is great when it happens,

    それが起こったときには素晴らしいことです。

  • but all it takes is for one person on that team to express a negative emotion

    しかし、そのチームの一人が負の感情を表現するだけでいい

  • for the whole thing to fall apart.

    全てが崩壊するために

  • Now take a moment and think about how long you've held onto an irritation,

    今は時間をかけて、あなたがどれくらいの期間イライラを抱えていたかを考えてみてください。

  • especially after an encounter from a prickly person.

    特にチクチクした人からの出会いの後には

  • Was it days?

    何日だったかな?

  • Weeks? Months?

    数週間?何ヶ月?

  • Man, I had this one boss,

    俺にはこのボスがいた

  • who I let his negative emotions jump and attach to me.

    彼のネガティブな感情を跳ねさせて、私に執着させてしまった人。

  • And I held onto them for a year --

    私は一年も持っていた

  • literally a year.

    文字通り一年。

  • And when I think back now,

    今思い返してみると

  • I can't help but cringe because of all the productivity lost

    生産性が低下していても仕方がない

  • and the amount of stress that I felt

    と感じたストレスの量と

  • all because my boss and I caught each other's frustrations

    上司と私が不満をぶつけ合ったから

  • and couldn't escape the cycle of the jumping cholla effect.

    とジャンピングチョーラ効果のサイクルから抜け出せなかった。

  • But the ideal situation,

    しかし、理想的な状況。

  • which improves team and group dynamics as well as individual happiness,

    これは、チームやグループのダイナミクスだけでなく、個人の幸福度を向上させることができます。

  • is for everyone to control their emotional state

    は、誰もが自分の感情をコントロールするために

  • by sending back the other person's emotions to them.

    相手の感情を相手に送り返すことで

  • And research shows that there's two common emotion regulation strategies

    そして、研究では、2つの一般的な感情調節戦略があることを示しています。

  • that can help.

    助けることができます。

  • And I use both of these with my clients all the time.

    そして、私はこの両方をクライアントといつも使っています。

  • Do you remember cognitive appraisal

    認知鑑定を覚えていますか?

  • where you assign meaning to a situation based on your goals and expectations?

    自分の目標や期待に基づいて、状況に意味を割り当てるところですか?

  • Well, the first strategy is called cognitive reappraisal,

    さて、最初の戦略は認知的再評価と呼ばれるものです。

  • where you work to reframe how you interpret the situation

    しごとばしょ

  • in order to regulate your emotions.

    感情を整えるために

  • It's like taking active steps to reevaluate your hiking path

    自分のハイキングコースを見直すために、アクティブな一歩を踏み出しているようなもの

  • in order to avoid the jumping cholla.

    跳びチョラを避けるために

  • Let me give you an example.

    例を挙げてみましょう。

  • So I once had this soldier

    だから、私はかつて、この兵士を持っていた

  • who was training to become an interrogator.

    尋問者になるための訓練を受けていた

  • And every time he got feedback, he immediately became defensive

    そして、彼はフィードバックを得るたびに、すぐに防衛的になりました。

  • and then would justify his behavior.

    そして彼の行動を正当化する

  • Eventually he told me that he acted that way

    最終的には、彼はそのように行動したと言われました。

  • because he thought his instructor just didn't like him.

    教官に嫌われていると思っていたからだ。

  • So with the use of cognitive reappraisal,

    だから認知再鑑定を利用して

  • he was taught to actively pause and reframe his interpretation

    頓珍漢なことを教えられた

  • and expectation of the situation.

    と期待しています。

  • So if he thought "my instructor hates me,

    だから、「教官に嫌われている」と思っていたら

  • he always looks upset,"

    "彼はいつも動揺している"

  • he would reframe that thought to

    彼はその考えを改めて

  • "he may look upset

    "動揺した顔をしているかもしれない

  • but he takes the time to walk me through what I need to fix."

    彼は時間をかけて私が直すべきことを教えてくれます。"

  • Now training your brain to reframe takes time,

    今、リフレームするための脳のトレーニングには時間がかかります。

  • and sometimes it's not easy

    時には苦しい時もある

  • because there's a hint of truth within each of our thoughts.

    私たちの考えの中に真実のヒントがあるからよ

  • But if you work consistently on reframing,

    でも、一貫してリフレーミングに取り組めば

  • you'll be able to engage prickly people without being negatively affected

    刺のある人には刺されない

  • by the other person's mood.

    相手の気分で

  • Acceptance is the other emotion regulation strategy.

    受容はもう一つの感情調節戦略です。

  • It means what you think.

    あなたが思っていることを意味しています。

  • It's learning to accept a moment for what it is

    あるがままの瞬間を受け入れることを学ぶことだ

  • and not for what you want it to be.

    あなたが望むもののためではなく

  • And when I teach people how to do this, I use a three-step framework:

    そして、その方法を人に教えるときには、3段階のフレームワークを使っています。

  • "OK; so what; now what."

    "わかった、だから何だ、次は何だ"

  • By saying "OK," you halt any additional judgment

    "OK "と言うことで、追加の判断を止めることができます。

  • to the person or to the situation.

    人にも状況にも

  • You then allow yourself space to accept your physiological responses

    そして、自分の生理的反応を受け入れるためのスペースを自分に与えます。

  • and your perception to what's happening.

    と、何が起こっているかに対するあなたの認識。

  • And once you've distanced yourself from your thoughts

    そして、一度自分の思考から距離を置くと

  • and your emotional state,

    と自分の感情の状態を

  • then you can say, "so what"

    と言われればそれまでだが

  • because this helps acknowledge what happened purely as an event.

    なぜなら、これは純粋にイベントとして起こったことを認めるのに役立つからです。

  • And as you transition into "now what"

    そして、「今何をしているか」に移行していくと

  • that means that you've gathered enough information

    ということは、十分な情報が集まっているということです

  • to be able to respond to the event.

    に対応できるようにしておきましょう。

  • Now most people can get to "OK,"

    今ではほとんどの人が "OK "を出せるようになりました。

  • but struggle to get past "so what" because it can be difficult

    難しいからといって、「なんだかんだ」では済まされない

  • to detach our physiological perception from the situation.

    生理的な認識を状況から切り離すことができます。

  • But here's what I tell people to keep in mind.

    しかし、ここで私が人に伝えていることがあります。

  • Acceptance doesn't mean that you're OK with what happened

    受け入れても何が起きてもいいということではない

  • or that you even want it to continue.

    続けることを望んでいるのか

  • It means that you're able to take an aerial shot of the exchange

    やりとりを空撮できるということは

  • and understand where the prickly spines are

    棘がどこにあるのかを理解する

  • and if they're worth attaching to.

    そして、それらが添付する価値があるかどうか。

  • Now, both of these strategies are my favorite

    さて、この2つの戦略はどちらも私のお気に入りの

  • because they're so powerful,

    なぜなら、彼らはとても強力だからです。

  • especially on the effects that they have on how we approach life and relationships.

    特に、私たちの人生や人間関係へのアプローチ方法に与える影響について。

  • And one study even suggests

    そして、ある研究では

  • that cognitive reappraisal tends to be associated

    認知的再評価が関連している傾向があること

  • with more immediate emotional relief in negative situations,

    否定的な状況では、より即時の感情的な救済と。

  • whereas acceptance may be better suited

    一方、受け入れの方が適しているかもしれません

  • for decreasing short-term physiological reactions in unpleasant situations.

    不快な状況での短期的な生理的反応を減少させるために。

  • But the best part?

    でも、一番いいところは?

  • Both of these strategies don't have to be separate practices.

    これらの戦略はどちらも別々の実践である必要はありません。

  • Acceptance and cognitive reappraisal can be used interchangeably

    受容と認知的再評価は互換的に使用することができます。

  • in order to maintain emotional self-control.

    感情のセルフコントロールを維持するために

  • The key though to implementing them is to become self-aware

    それらを実行するための鍵は、自己認識になることですが

  • when you become emotionally triggered by another person or event.

    他の人や出来事に感情的になったときに

  • And once you've consciously become aware of either your thoughts, emotions

    そして、一度意識的に自分の思考や感情のどちらかを意識するようになったら

  • or physical sensations,

    または物理的な感覚。

  • well then you can practice either technique.

    ならば、どちらの技を練習しても構わない。

  • These may be common concepts,

    これらは一般的な概念かもしれません。

  • but I'll tell you they're definitely not commonly practiced.

    と言っても絶対に一般的には行われていないと言っておきます。

  • So by remembering the jumping cholla effect,

    そこで、ジャンピングチョーラ効果を覚えることで

  • it will help you to be more self-aware and self-regulated.

    意識を高め、自分を律することができるようになります。

  • And in turn, well, you'll avoid getting pricked by ...

    そして、順番に、まあ、あなたは刺されるのを避けることができます...

  • a prick.

    ゲスだ

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

Transcriber: Leslie Gauthier Reviewer: Joanna Pietrulewicz

書き手: Leslie Gauthierレビュアー: Leslie Gauthier レビュアー。ジョアンナ・ピエトルウィッツ

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます