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  • FEMALE SPEAKER: Hell, everyone.

  • It's my pleasure to introduce Pat Gelsinger, our speaker

  • today.

  • Pat started his career at Intel.

  • He was recruited to be a technician in the beginning.

  • And then as he was working full time,

  • he got his bachelor's degree in double E at Santa Clara.

  • And then he went on to get his master's degree

  • in double E and computer science at Stanford.

  • At age 31 he was the youngest vice president at Intel,

  • and then he became the first CTO at Intel.

  • In 2010 he was recruited by EMC in Boston to be the COO.

  • And then in 2012 he was the CEO of VMware in the Bay Area.

  • Pat and his wife Linda have four children.

  • And today, he is going to speak about his book,

  • "The Juggling Act, Bringing Balance

  • to Your Faith, Family, and Work."

  • Please welcome Pat Gelsinger.

  • [APPLAUSE]

  • PAT GELSINGER: Thank you, Petula.

  • Great to be here with you today.

  • I'll cover a little bit about my story.

  • As we go along, we'll dig into this subject

  • of juggling a little bit.

  • I didn't try to embarrass myself with the juggling balls,

  • but maybe afterward I will.

  • We'll see.

  • And then a little bit about being a Christian

  • both in the workplace and in the Bay Area.

  • And then we'll open up for Q&A and talk about whatever

  • else you feel like as well.

  • So be informal and interactive.

  • So a little bit about my story.

  • I was born and raised in Pennsylvania.

  • And if you've ever been to the Amish Country

  • in Pennsylvania, the ultra, ultra conservatives,

  • the Amish-- they haven't accepted any new technology

  • since 1869.

  • And then there's the Mennonites who

  • are, like, really conservative, but less so than the Amish.

  • And then there's the Pennsylvania Dutch.

  • And that's what I was growing up.

  • So compared to the Amish we were really liberal.

  • But by all means very, very conservative farm community.

  • My dad was eighth of nine children.

  • So son number one had a farm, son number two,

  • daughter number one-- it got down to at number eight,

  • and my grandfather said, we have enough farms in the family.

  • Just work with your brothers.

  • Otherwise I'd be a farm boy in Pennsylvania today.

  • And when I came out to Intel I knew a lot more

  • about cow chips than computer chips at the time.

  • At six days old I was baptized with full knowledge of what

  • I was doing in our church, and became

  • president of the youth group at 12 years old,

  • and those types of things.

  • And I thought I was a Christian just because I was born

  • and raised in that environment.

  • There was one good reason to go to church.

  • That was to meet girls or impress their mothers

  • or grandmothers.

  • And other than that, I was just rotten the other 6 and 1/2

  • days of the week.

  • I ended up skipping my last year of high school.

  • I accidentally took a scholarship exam

  • to get a tech degree.

  • So I ended up skipping my last year of high school,

  • getting my associate's degree.

  • So literally, I graduated from high school with my tech degree

  • in the summer of a '79 at 18 years old.

  • And Intel came recruiting.

  • So there was sort of an industry-wide shortage

  • of technicians.

  • So Intel came from the West Coast

  • to recruit and invite me on a trip to come to California.

  • And the guy who was interviewing,

  • Ron Smith was his name, he interviewed 12 people that day.

  • And any of you who've done a lot of interviewing,

  • you know at about number six, you sort of lose

  • track of John versus Joe.

  • And about number nine, you lose track of Jane versus John.

  • And I was number 12 on his interview list.

  • And this is what he wrote about me after the interview.

  • He said, smart, aggressive, arrogant.

  • He'll fit right in.

  • So I got invited to come to interview with Intel.

  • 18 years old and I had never been on an airplane.

  • At 18 years old, you're getting invited for free trip

  • to California.

  • And they even through in I could stay for the weekend.

  • So how long you think it took me to decide to take the trip?

  • About a nanosecond.

  • Yeah, sure.

  • I'm taking a free trip to California.

  • First time an airplane.

  • But I promised my mom before I left,

  • no way am I moving to California.

  • I mean, they're crazy out there.

  • Earthquakes and cults and stuff.

  • I'm a farm boy in Pennsylvania.

  • No problem.

  • I'm staying here.

  • But after I came and interviewed with Intel,

  • they made me a job offer.

  • And the thing that convinced me to go to Intel more

  • than anything else as a technician,

  • I wanted to be the engineer on the other side of the table

  • telling the tech what to do.

  • That was my whole career ambition

  • summed up the one thing.

  • | want to sit on that side of the table.

  • And they had a tuition reimbursement program.

  • So as long as I was working 30 hours a week or more

  • and getting passing grades, they would pay for all my school.

  • So I got my bachelor's at Santa Clara,

  • did my master's at Stanford, was working on my Ph.D.

  • At Stanford-- all of that paid for by Intel.

  • And I was a poor farm boy, so this is pretty good.

  • So I took the job with Intel, moved out

  • here at the ripe old age of 18, and then

  • started working full time and going to school full time.

  • And light-weight programs like Santa Clara, no problem.

  • Graduate programs like Stanford while you're

  • working full time, no problem.

  • Ph.D.-- so this is pretty intense.

  • Working full time, going to school full time,

  • but I loved it.

  • The first time I ever had a computer architecture class,

  • it was like, that's what I want to do for the rest of my life.

  • I was one of those kids you didn't want

  • to be in the class with me.

  • I had my first computer architecture class.

  • I found out what the textbook was.

  • Over the summer, I read the entire textbook,

  • finished every problem in the textbook,

  • and showed up on the first day of class

  • having done the entire syllabus for computer architecture.

  • Yeah.

  • The professor-- it was a new textbook

  • on computer architecture, Tenenbaum's computer textbook

  • at the time-- he, the professor hadn't

  • done past the second chapter yet in the class.

  • So my notes became the notes for the class.

  • But I was sort of manic about it in that way.

  • I also-- when I came to California

  • I thought I was a Christian.

  • And I showed up, went to church on Sunday for what purpose?

  • Meet girls and impress their mothers and grandmothers.

  • It's that simple.

  • So what did I do when I got to California?

  • Went to church to meet girls and impress their mother

  • and grandmothers.

  • So walked down the street to Santa Clara Christian Church,

  • and sure enough that first Sunday met

  • Linda, who you'll meet in a little bit.

  • I'll show a picture of her in a second.

  • And she asked me early in our relationship

  • if I was a Christian.

  • And my answer was yes.

  • I was baptized when I was six days old,

  • president of the youth group, went to church every Sunday

  • to meet girls.

  • Of course I'm a Christian.

  • And as we got to know each other,

  • the church adopted me and it quickly became apparent

  • that I was, at best case, a Sunday Christian,

  • and a lot worse than that most other days of the week.

  • And the sermon topic in February of 1980 was based on Revelation

  • 3:15-16. .

  • "I know your deeds, that you are neither hot nor cold.

  • I wish you were one of the other.

  • But since you're neither cold or hot but lukewarm,

  • I'm about to spit you out of my mouth."

  • And that verse cut me to the heart

  • because there I was, I like to feign Christianity on the one

  • side, looking good.

  • And on the other side was living my own life.

  • And I came to that moment of crisis of my personal faith

  • and said, I have to make a decision.

  • And I was really challenged in that.

  • And in February of 1980 made the decision to be hot for God,

  • and made the decision to be a full-time Christian.

  • And absolutely at that point made

  • this fundamental, life changing decision.

  • I'm going to be hot for God and live

  • my life as a Christian in the workplace and what I do.

  • So that's February of 1980.

  • Just a couple of months later-- so I'm

  • a baby Christian at this point, sort

  • of figuring out what it really means to read the word,

  • be in fellowship, all the other things associated with that--

  • and God puts on my heart in a deep and profound way,

  • become a minister.

  • And I'm like, I don't want to be a minister.

  • I'm loving this tech stuff, computer architecture,

  • knocking it out of the park at my job.

  • That's the last thing I want to do.

  • And I just wrestled with God for months about the idea

  • of becoming a minister.

  • It's like I don't want to be like-- just nothing

  • about it attracted me.

  • So I just wrestled with God, argued with him about it

  • as I was praying.

  • And after doing that for a couple of months,

  • just couldn't let up in my heart and in the soul about it,

  • and finally said, OK, God, I give up.

  • If this happens, and I laid a-- you know, in the Bible

  • they had a story where Gideon lays the fleece before God.

  • The ground is dry, the fleece is wet.

  • The next day the fleece is wet, the ground is dry.

  • And I laid a fleece before God and said, if this happens,

  • I will go into full-time ministry.

  • And it was just finally giving up before God.

  • And after laying that fleece before him,

  • as soon as I did it, he came back and said,

  • the workplace is your ministry.

  • And then since that point in time,

  • and my life verse at that point became Colossians 3:23-24.

  • "Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart,

  • as working for the Lord, not for human masters,

  • since you know that you will receive an inheritance

  • from the Lord as a reward.

  • It is the Lord Christ you are serving."

  • And that's become my life view.

  • I'm in the workplace.

  • And whether I'm a low-level technician,

  • a medium-level engineer, now CEO of a great software company,

  • I'm working for the Lord Jesus Christ as my full-time CEO.

  • It's great that I get us a paycheck from VMware.

  • And You go online, you can check out-- I

  • make too much money as a CEO.

  • That's really cool.

  • And I have a board of directors as well.

  • You can check out all them online as well.

  • But my full-time CEO is the Lord Jesus Christ.

  • And my job, the platform, everything I'm given,

  • is to be a workplace minister.

  • And there's a few who are called to vocational ministry.

  • But all of us who claim the name of Jesus Christ

  • are called to be full-time ministers.

  • In the workplace, in the home place, in the marketplace,

  • in the school place, or wherever we are as Christians,

  • we are called to be full-time ministers.

  • It is the Lord Christ you are serving.

  • Now, also I do want to just emphasize a little bit that

  • being a Christian and an engineer