Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Nothing captures the essence of a good life better than a tree flourishing.

    豊かな木ほど、良い生活の本質を捉えているものはありません。

  • A good life is one where we continuously grow, manifest our potential, and put forth our

    良い人生とは、私たちが継続的に成長し、可能性を顕在化させ、私たちの力を発揮するものです。

  • best fruit.

    最高の果物。

  • I want you to keep this image in your mind as you watch the video: your best life is

    動画を見ながら、この映像を心に留めておいてほしい:あなたの最高の人生は

  • the one in which you fully bloom like a tree.

    木のように満開に咲くもの。

  • And the difference between living your worst life and your best life depends on your habits.

    そして、最悪の人生を生きるかどうかの違いは、自分の習慣にかかっています。

  • And the secret to building good habits and breaking bad ones is contained in this simple,

    そして、良い習慣を作り、悪い習慣を壊す秘訣は、このシンプルなものに含まれています。

  • but powerful image, in which there are two key components: the forest and the tree.

    森と木という2つの重要な要素があるが、パワフルなイメージ。

  • As I break down each component of the image, I'll give you the ultimate guide to building

    画像の各構成要素を分解しながら、私はあなたに

  • habits.

    癖があります。

  • Before I show you the new way to understand and build habits, let's take a look at the

    新しい理解と習慣の作り方をお見せする前に

  • current way.

    現行の方法。

  • Most books or videos on habits teach some variation of this loop: a cue leads to a craving

    習慣に関するほとんどの本やビデオでは、このループのいくつかのバリエーションを教えています。

  • leads to a response leads to a reward.

    反応が報酬につながる

  • Some variations use cue-routine-reward instead,

    いくつかのバリエーションでは、代わりにキュー・ルーティーン・リワードを使用しています。

  • And some use stimulus-response-reward.

    そして、刺激-反応-報酬を使うものもあります。

  • But as far as I'm concerned, they're practically all the same, so let's consider the newest

    でも、私が見た限りでは、実質的には同じようなものばかりなので、最新の

  • version: cue-craving-response-reward.

    バージョン: cue-craving-response-reward.

  • A cue is an external or internal trigger that signals the potential for a reward.

    キューとは、報酬の可能性を知らせる外部または内部のトリガーのことです。

  • Your phone dings for example, which is a cue indicating that you have a notification, and

    あなたの携帯電話は、例えば、あなたが通知を持っていることを示す合図であり

  • this leads to the craving of a potential reward.

    これは潜在的な報酬を渇望することにつながる。

  • Craving is a feeling that motivates you to take action, and the strength of a craving

    渇望は行動を起こす動機となる感情であり、渇望の強さは

  • depends on how you interpret the cue.

    キューをどう解釈するかにかかっています。

  • For example, when your phone dings, your brain begins to predict what the ding meant.

    例えば、携帯電話が鳴ると、脳はその鳴動の意味を予測し始めます。

  • Did you receive a message from someone you like?

    好きな人からメッセージが届きましたか?

  • Or did you receive a message from someone you don't like?

    それとも、嫌いな人からメッセージが届いたのでしょうか?

  • The prediction you make determines how strongly you crave, or don't crave, checking your

    予測は、あなたがどの程度強く渇望しているか、渇望していないかを判断し、あなたの

  • phone.

    電話。

  • Craving leads to a response, and response is the actual action or habit you use to satisfy

    渇望は反応につながり、反応は、あなたが満足するために使用する実際の行動や習慣です。

  • a craving.

    渇望。

  • In our example, our response means checking the notification.

    この例では、私たちの応答は通知を確認することを意味しています。

  • And finally, the reward is the thing that actually satisfies the craving, closes the

    そして最後に、報酬とは、実際に渇望を満たすものであり、その渇望を閉じるものです。

  • loop, and encourages us to repeat the action in the future.

    のループを作り、今後の行動の繰り返しを促します。

  • In our example, we see that we got some likes on our Instagram, and this makes us feel good

    私たちの例では、私たちは私たちのInstagramにいくつかの同類を得たことを参照してください、これは私たちに良い感じになります。

  • and more likely to check our notifications again in the future.

    と、今後の通知を再度確認する可能性が高くなりました。

  • In this model, you can play with any of the four componentscue, craving, response,

    このモデルでは、4つのコンポーネント-キュー、渇望、応答のいずれかで遊ぶことができます。

  • rewardto encourage good habits and discourage bad ones.

    報酬は、良い習慣を奨励し、悪い習慣を思いとどまらせます。

  • When you want to encourage a good habit, make the cue obvious, the craving attractive, the

    良い習慣を奨励したいときは、手掛かりを明らかにして、渇望を魅力的なものにしてください。

  • response easy, and the reward satisfying.

    応答は簡単で、報酬は満足のいくものでした。

  • If you want to discourage a bad habit, make the cue invisible, the craving unattractive,

    悪い癖を戒めたいなら、出番を目に見えないものにして、渇望を魅力のないものにしましょう。

  • the response hard, and the reward unsatisfying.

    難しい反応と満足のいかない報酬。

  • Let's look at how the whole model works in practice.

    では、実際にモデル全体がどのように機能するのかを見てみましょう。

  • Let's say I want to introduce the supposedly good habit of taking multivitamins each day.

    マルチビタミンを毎日摂るという、本来は良いはずの習慣を紹介してみましょう。

  • So I buy a container of gummy multivitamins and place them on my nightstand.

    なので、グミの入ったマルチビタミンの容器を買ってきて、ナイトスタンドに置いています。

  • The cue is obvious: I'll see the gummies every time I reach for my glasses in the morning.

    出番は一目瞭然、朝、メガネに手を伸ばすたびにグミが出てくる。

  • The craving is attractive because I know the gummies will make me healthier.

    グミで健康になれると知っているからこその渇望は魅力的です。

  • The reward is satisfying because the gummies taste good.

    グミが美味しいので、ご褒美は満足です。

  • And finally, the response is easy because, after the initial set up cost, all I have

    そして最終的には、初期設定費用の後に、私が持っているものが全てなので、対応は簡単です。

  • to do each morning is walk over and eat them.

    毎朝やることは、歩いて歩いて食べることです。

  • So that's an example of introducing a good habit using the current model, but how do

    ということで、現行モデルを使って良い習慣を導入した例ですが、どうやって

  • you get rid of a bad one?

    悪いものを処分するのか?

  • Let's say I want to stop getting distracted by my phone when I'm working, so I give

    仕事中にスマホに気を取られないようにしたいので、以下のようにしています。

  • my phone over to a friend before I start.

    始める前に友人に携帯を渡した。

  • This helps because the cue is invisible: I no longer see my phone vibrating and receiving

    キューが見えないので助かっています。私はもはや私の携帯電話が振動して受信しているのを見ることはありません。

  • notifications while I work.

    仕事をしながらの通知。

  • The craving is unattractive because I have to embarrass myself by asking for the phone

    渇望は電話を求めることで恥をかかせてしまうから魅力がない

  • back.

    後ろの方。

  • The response is made harder because I have to go through the trouble of negotiating to

    わざわざ交渉しないといけないので、対応が難しくなっている

  • get it back.

    取り戻す

  • And lastly, the rewards are less satisfying due to the increase in work required to even

    そして最後に、それすらに必要な作業が増えるため、報酬の満足度が低くなります。

  • get them.

    捕まえろ

  • So the current model is easy to follow and implement.

    そのため、現在のモデルは簡単に追従して実装することができます。

  • Just modify the cue, craving, response, and reward depending on whether the habit is good

    習慣が良いかどうかに応じて、手掛かり、渇望、反応、報酬を変更するだけです。

  • or bad.

    とか悪いとか。

  • So what's the problem with it?” you ask.

    "で、何が問題なの?"って聞くんですよね。

  • While the current model has many good qualities, I think it has one massive flaw that makes

    現行モデルには多くの良い点がありますが、私は1つの大きな欠陥があると考えています。

  • it less useful than you might think,

    思ったよりも役に立たない

  • and that's what I'm going to discuss next.

    ということで、次はそれについてお話したいと思います。

  • The main problem with the current model is that it's solipsistic.

    現行モデルの最大の問題点は、ソリプシス的なことです。

  • What do I mean by this?

    これはどういう意味なんだろう?

  • The current model encourages you to see yourself as the centre of the world.

    現行モデルは、自分を世界の中心として見ることを奨励しています。

  • Everything surrounding you becomes a cue or a tool to leverage for your own growth.

    自分を取り巻くすべてのものが、自分自身の成長のための手掛かりやツールになります。

  • But the world is fundamentally not a place of cues surrounding you, which you can just

    しかし、世界は根本的に自分を取り巻く合図の場ではなく、単に

  • optimize and rearrange to your liking.

    好みに合わせて最適化してアレンジしてください。

  • Rather it's a place of relationship.

    むしろそれは人間関係の場です。

  • If you view life through the lens of the current model, I think you'll have an inaccurate

    現行モデルのレンズを通して人生を見ると、不正確な

  • perception of reality

    現実認識

  • which will stifle your capacity to bloom, which was, remember, why habits even mattered

    咲かず飛ばず

  • in the first place.

    そもそも

  • The blooming of a tree is not something that it can make happen on its own.

    樹木の開花は自力で実現できるものではありません。

  • It can't just optimize itself into a good life.

    自分自身を最適化して良い人生にすることはできません。

  • The tree depends on the forest as much as the forest depends on the tree.

    木は森に依存するのと同じくらい森に依存している。

  • When you were a baby, you were born, as far as we know, into a family, in a home, in a

    赤ちゃんの時は、私たちが知る限りでは、家族の中に、家庭の中に、そして

  • city, in a country, in a world that you did not choose, and this has probably been one

    あなたが選んだのではない世界での都市、国、あなたが選んだのではない世界で、これはおそらく一つのことだったでしょう。

  • of the greatest factors in determining the quality of your life.

    人生の質を決める最大の要素のうち

  • And when you were a baby, you hardly knew a thing.

    赤ん坊の頃はほとんど何も知らなかったのに

  • You couldn't change your clothes, feed yourself, or really self-regulate yourself that well

    着替えもできず、食事もできず、本当に自己管理もできず

  • at all.

    全然

  • The most effective actions you could probably do were laugh and cry.

    おそらく一番効果的な行動は、笑って泣くことだったのではないでしょうか。

  • You depended on your parents to survive and thrive, and a lot of your early lessons about

    あなたは生き残り、繁栄するために両親に依存していたし、あなたの初期のレッスンの多くは

  • life and the world came from them.

    命と世界は彼らから生まれたのです。

  • Now think about the technologies that have most impacted your life such as the car, the

    今、あなたの生活に最も影響を与えた技術について考えてみましょう。

  • computer, the internet, and the phone.

    パソコン、インターネット、電話。

  • Or what about theories like Plato's theory of forms or Einstein's theory of relativity?

    それともプラトンの形態論やアインシュタインの相対性理論のような理論はどうなんだろう?

  • What about works of art like Lord of the Rings or Dante's Divine Comedy?

    ロード・オブ・ザ・リングやダンテの神曲のような芸術作品はどうでしょうか?

  • All of these works were likely invented by someone other than yourself.

    これらの作品は全て自分以外の誰かが発明した可能性が高い。

  • All of these examples show how much the quality of your life depends on others, but also,

    これらの例はどれも、自分の人生の質がどれだけ他人に依存しているかを示していますが、それだけではありません。

  • how much the quality of someone else's life can depend on you.

    他人の人生の質がどれだけ自分にかかっているか

  • The world is fundamentally an interdependent place of relationships, not cues.

    世界は基本的にはキューではなく、相互に依存した関係性の場です。

  • The tree depends on the forest and the forest on the tree.

    木は森に、木は森に依存しています。

  • I believe this interdependence isn't accurately captured in the current model,

    この相互依存性は、現在のモデルでは正確には捉えられていないと思います。

  • which is why I'm putting forward a new model in which the forest-tree relationship is central.

    だから私は森と木の関係を中心とした新しいモデルを提案しているのです。

  • Because again, to fully bloom, you need a harmony between both.

    なぜなら、再び、完全に開花するためには、両方の調和が必要だからです。

  • So without further ado, let's get into it.

    というわけで、これ以上は割愛しますが、本題に入りましょう。

  • Here's a quick overview of the new model of habits.

    ここでは、習慣の新モデルの概要を簡単にご紹介します。

  • There are two key components: the forest, which represents the environment, and the

    環境を表す「森」と

  • tree, which represents the individual.

    の木は、個人を表しています。

  • Let's start by analyzing the forest.

    まずは森の分析から始めましょう。

  • Every tree is born into a forest, and the forest sets limits on the potential of the

    すべての木は森に生まれ、森は可能性に限界を設定しています。

  • tree.

    の木を見てみましょう。

  • How much sunlight does the forest get, what are the soil conditions, how competitive or

    森林の日照量、土壌の状態、競争力の高さ、森林の状態はどうか?

  • friendly is the ecosystem, how much precipitation is there, what are the atmospheric conditions

    友好的な生態系は、どのくらいの降水量がある、大気条件は何ですか

  • like, so on and so forth.

    みたいな感じで。

  • All of these factors limit how much the individual tree can thrive.

    これらの要因はすべて、個々の木がどれだけ繁栄できるかを制限しています。

  • When you're a baby, your forest is your home.

    赤ちゃんの時は、森がお家です。

  • But as you grow older, your forest expands, and you begin to see yourself as the citizen

    しかし、年を重ねるごとに森が広がり、自分自身が市民としての姿を見始めます。

  • of a city, then a country, and then the world.

    都市の、次に国の、そして世界の。

  • The forest represents your evolving environment, and the environment limits how much you can

    森はあなたの進化する環境を表し、環境はあなたができることを制限します。

  • thrive.

    繁栄しています。

  • If, for example, you're stuck in a city with no opportunities and lots of corruption,

    例えば、チャンスがなく汚職が多い街で動けなくなったとします。

  • your growth will be limited.

    あなたの成長は限られています。

  • But if you're open to moving to another city or if you live in one with a supportive

    しかし、あなたが他の都市に引っ越すことにオープンにしている場合、またはあなたが支持されている1つの都市に住んでいる場合は、

  • environment and lots of opportunities, you can maximize your chances of reaching your

    たくさんの環境とチャンスがあれば、あなたが到達する可能性を最大限に高めることができます。

  • full potential.

    潜在能力をフルに発揮します。

  • So the forest represents the entire environment which limits what you, the tree, can become.

    つまり、森は環境全体を表していて、木であるあなたが何になれるかを制限しているのです。

  • And there are two important parts of the forest we need to consider: the soil and the relationships.

    そして、私たちが考えるべき森の重要な部分は、土壌と関係性の2つです。

  • Let's start by analyzing the soil.

    まずは土壌の分析から始めましょう。

  • The soil represents all of the opportunities available to the tree in the forest.

    土壌は、森の中の木に利用可能なすべての機会を表しています。

  • If the soil is rich with opportunity, the tree has a lot of potential for growth.

    機会に恵まれた土壌であれば、その木は成長の可能性を秘めています。

  • But if the soil is lacking in opportunity, the tree will be limited in how much it can

    しかし、土壌に機会が不足している場合、木ができることは限られています。

  • grow.

    成長します。

  • The soil can be compared to the opportunities for growth available in a city.

    土壌は、都市で利用可能な成長の機会に例えることができます。

  • How safe are the neighbourhoods?

    近所の安全性は?

  • How good are the schools?

    学校はどのくらい良いのでしょうか?

  • The grocery stores?

    雑貨屋さん?

  • What kind of jobs are available and how many?

    どのような求人があり、どのくらいの数があるのでしょうか?

  • How good is the collected knowledge?

    集められた知識はどれだけ優れているのか?

  • How advanced is the technology?

    どのくらい技術が進んでいるのか?

  • And how accessible are all of these opportunities?

    そして、これらの機会はどれだけアクセスしやすいのでしょうか?

  • For example, a city with less job opportunities provides less or limited potential for growth

    例えば、雇用機会の少ない都市では、成長の可能性が少ない、または限られています。

  • when compared to a city with more job opportunities.

    求人数の多い都市と比較すると

  • So the soil represents the opportunity available for growth.

    土は成長の機会を表しているのですね。

  • Now let's move on to the next important part of a forest: the relationships between

    次に、森の次の重要な部分である、森と森の間の関係について説明します。

  • organisms.

    生物のことを指しています。

  • Are the relationships in the forest symbiotic or parasitic?

    森の中の関係は共生的なものなのか、寄生的なものなのか。

  • Do the organisms help one another thrive or not?

    生物はお互いに助け合って繁栄しているのか、していないのか。

  • How competitive is it?

    どれだけ競争力があるのか?

  • These answers make up the politics of the forest.

    これらの回答が森の政治を構成しています。

  • Imagine two big trees surrounding a little tree.

    小さな木を囲む2本の大きな木を想像してみてください。

  • If the two big trees take all the water and sunlight and refuse to share any with the

    もし二本の大木が水と日光を全て取り、何も分けてくれないとしたら

  • little tree, which trees can do through their root systems, the little tree will then have

    小さな木は、木がその根系を介して行うことができる、小さな木は、その後、その小さな木が

  • to struggle much harder to survive, thrive, and achieve a fraction of the growth of the

    生き残り、繁栄し、成長のほんの一部を達成するために、はるかに困難にもがいています。

  • bigger trees.

    大きな木。

  • The relationships in our own lives function the same way: some people build us up and

    私たち自身の生活の中での人間関係も同じように機能します。

  • make it easier to thrive, while others suppress us and make it harder.

    繁栄しやすくする一方で、他の人は私たちを抑圧して苦しくさせる。

  • And naturally, someone who goes through lifefrom a home, to a school, to a business, to a marriagemaking

    そして当然のことながら、家庭、学校、会社、結婚と人生を歩んできた人が

  • lots of symbiotic relationships is going to have an easier time blooming than someone

    縁の下の力持ちは花が咲きやすい

  • who doesn't.

    そうでない人

  • So now that we've looked at the two important components of a forest, the soil and the relationships,

    さて、今回は森を構成する2つの重要な要素、土とその関係性について見てきました。

  • let's move on to analyzing the tree.

    では、ツリーの分析に移りましょう。

  • The tree represents the individual, and when it comes to the tree, we need to analyze two

    ツリーは個人を表していて、それがツリーになると、次の2つの分析が必要になります。

  • critical component: the roots and the fruits.

    重要な要素:根と果実。

  • The roots represent the actions we take to discover and capitalize on the opportunities

    ルーツは、私たちが機会を発見し、活用するために取る行動を表しています。

  • in our environment.

    私たちの環境の中で

  • And at any point in time, the tree is making one of two choices: create a new root and

    そして、どの時点でも、木は2つの選択肢のうちの1つを選択しています。

  • discover a new path, or optimize its current ones.

    新しいパスを発見したり、現在のパスを最適化したりすることができます。

  • So how does the tree decide what to do?

    では、木はどうやって決めているのでしょうか?

  • For now, let's make the assumption that the tree spreads its roots in such a way that

    とりあえず、木が根を広げるような形で

  • it can maximize its growth.

    は、その成長を最大化することができます。

  • Remember that the soil contains opportunities for growth, and so the tree is trying to discover

    土には成長の機会が含まれていることを覚えておいてください。

  • and capitalize on those opportunities with the least amount of work possible.

    そして、可能な限り最小限の作業でこれらの機会を活用することができます。

  • In other words, you can say that the tree spreads its roots in a way that maximizes

    言い換えれば、木がその根を最大限に広げる方法で

  • its rewards from the environment and minimizes the work required.

    環境からの報酬を得て、必要な作業を最小限に抑えることができます。

  • Let's put it into a formula which we can use later on.

    後で使えるような式にしてみましょう。

  • And at any point in time, you're making the same decision as our tree: should you

    そして、どの時点でも、あなたは私たちの木と同じ決断をしています。

  • discover a new action or optimize and utilize your current ones.

    新しいアクションを発見したり、現在のアクションを最適化して活用したりすることができます。

  • And like the tree, you're trying to maximize the rewards you get from the environment while

    そして、木のように、環境から得られる報酬を最大化する一方で

  • minimizing the work required.

    必要な作業を最小限に抑えることができます。

  • Imagine two people who want to start eating healthier snacks.

    健康的なおやつを食べ始めたいと思っている二人を想像してみてください。

  • Let's call them John and Jane.

    ジョンとジェーンと呼ぼう

  • Now both John and Jane have an action list which shows all of the actions they know they

    これで、ジョンとジェーンの両方は、自分が知っているすべてのアクションを示すアクションリストを持っています。

  • can do.

    することができます。

  • On the left is the action, and on the right is the perceived value of that action.

    左側が行動で、右側がその行動の知覚価値です。

  • Let's populate these lists and calculate the perceived value score.

    これらのリストを入力し、知覚価値スコアを計算してみましょう。

  • Remember that formula I presented earlier?

    先ほど紹介した公式を覚えていますか?

  • Value = reward/work.

    価値=報酬・仕事。

  • We're going to use this formula now to calculate the perceived value of an action.

    今からこの式を使って、行動の知覚価値を計算します。

  • So right now, John and Jane are both currently aware of two types of snacks: ice cream and

    だから今現在、ジョンもジェーンも2種類のスナック菓子を意識しているのは、アイスクリームと

  • broccoli.

    ブロッコリーです。

  • They both keep ice cream and broccoli easily accessible in their freezer or fridge.

    どちらもアイスクリームやブロッコリーを冷凍庫や冷蔵庫で簡単に手に入れられるようにしています。

  • All they have to do to eat either one is pull it out.

    どっちも食うには抜くしかない。

  • So let's assign a flat work score of 1 to both actions.

    そこで、両方のアクションにフラットワークのスコアを1としてみましょう。

  • Now let's say John doesn't really like broccoli: he hates the taste and doesn't

    さて、ジョンはブロッコリーがあまり好きではないとしましょう。

  • really perceive the health benefits.

    本当に健康上の利点を認識しています。

  • So he assigned a reward score of 1, and to him, this gives broccoli an overall value

    報酬のスコアを1にして ブロッコリーに総合的な価値を与えています

  • score of 1.

    のスコア。

  • On the other hand, John really loves the taste of ice cream and doesn't perceive any negative

    一方、ジョンはアイスクリームの味が本当に好きで、ネガティブなことは何も感じません。

  • health consequences.

    健康への影響。

  • So he assigns it a reward score of 9, and this gives ice cream, for him, a value score

    だから彼はそれに9の報酬スコアを割り当て、これは彼にとってアイスクリームに価値スコアを与える

  • of 9.

    9の

  • Now Jane on the other hand doesn't mind the taste of broccoli and gives it a reward

    一方のジェーンはブロッコリーの味を気にせず、ご褒美をあげています。

  • score of 4, but she really loves the taste of ice cream and gives it a score of 9.

    4点ですが、彼女は本当にアイスクリームの味が大好きで、9点をつけています。

  • And like John, health consequences don't factor into her decision.

    ジョンのように健康上の影響は 彼女の決定には関係ない

  • This gives Jane a value score of 9 for ice cream and 4 for broccoli.

    これにより、ジェーンはアイスクリームに9点、ブロッコリーに4点の価値スコアを与えられます。

  • Because ice cream sits at the top of both of their action lists, John and Jane always

    アイスクリームは彼らの行動リストの両方のトップにあるので、ジョンとジェーンは常に

  • end up choosing it over the broccoli when it comes time to eat a snack.

    おやつの時間になるとブロッコリーよりもそれを選ぶことになります。

  • But let's introduce a small optimization for both of them: they both stop bringing

    しかし、両方のための小さな最適化を導入してみましょう:両方とも持ってくるのをやめる

  • ice cream homes and so whenever they want to eat it, they have to go out and buy it.

    アイスクリームの家なので、食べたくなったら買いに行かないといけません。

  • This optimization triples the work required, so now the work score for both people is 3.

    この最適化によって必要な作業が3倍になるので、これで2人の作業スコアは3になりました。

  • And remember, they both gave ice cream a reward score of 9, so this gives ice cream a value

    そして、彼らは両方ともアイスクリームに9の報酬スコアを与えたことを覚えているので、これはアイスクリームに値を与えます。

  • score of 3 for the both of them.

    2人とも3点。

  • Now we can see something interesting: this optimization was enough to knock ice cream

    今、私たちは面白いものを見ることができます:この最適化は、アイスクリームをノックするのに十分だった

  • below broccoli on the action list for Jane but not for John.

    ジェーンのためのアクションリストではなく、ジョンのためのアクションリストのブロッコリーの下。

  • Jane actually stops eating ice cream and switches to broccoli, while John just ends up driving

    ジェーンは実際にアイスクリームを食べることを停止し、ブロッコリーに切り替える一方、ジョンはちょうど運転を終了します。

  • to the store when he's hungry.

    お腹が空いた時にお店に

  • Optimization works for Jane but not for John.

    ジェーンには最適化が効くが ジョンには効かない

  • So what should John do?

    で、ジョンはどうすればいいの?

  • John needs to discover a new action through trial and error, and he can speed this process

    ジョンは試行錯誤しながら新しい行動を発見する必要があり、このプロセスをスピードアップさせることができます。

  • up by imitating the actions of someone who's already successful at what he's trying to

    虎の子の巻

  • do.

    します。

  • John talks