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  • Hi everyone, today's keyword is Chris...I mean, winter holiday.

  • By the way, why can't we say 'Merry Christmaswithout offending people anymore?

  • Also, what are the differences betweenMerry ChristmasandHappy Christmas”?

  • Let's find out, withPeople Also Ask

  • Hi, I am Shao, Welcome to what people also ask, where I search something seemingly obvious on Google

  • and share with you some of its PAA, aka People Also Ask, which is a feature telling

  • you what other people search on Google that relates to your query.

  • Pardon my French, but today's keyword is Christmas, which is a term probably

  • as offensive aswinter holidayto other people.

  • But how can these unremarkable December alternatives toSee you later!” andHi"

  • and "Good byebe offensive to someone?

  • The first PAAWhy we can't say Merry Christmas?” will answer this first question.

  • The first PAA is extracted from an article titledWhy can't we say 'Merry Christmas

  • anymore without offending people?” published in 2016 by The Palm Beach Post, which is an

  • American daily newspaper in...uhm..where is it... Palm Beach County,South Florida.

  • This article starts by discussing the controversy of a satanic display in Boca Raton's Sanborn Square

  • , a designated freedom of speech zone, near a Christmas tree and biblical Nativity scene.

  • The satanic display includes a pentagon and a sign readIn Satan we trust.

  • One nation under Antichrist.”

  • It was placed by Preston Smith, a member of the Freedom From Religion Foundation, which

  • is a Non-profit organization that promotes the separation of church and state. This organization challenges

  • the legitimacy of many federal and state programs that are faith-based.

  • As it turns out, there is an ongoing debate about whether America is a Christian country

  • or a secular one, and the proponents of church-state separation argues that their hard-earned tax dollars

  • shouldn't be going toward displays like Nativity scenes. And also, Christmas, since it's a

  • religious holiday, shouldn't be a national holiday.

  • But obviously, the government can't cancel Christmas because it's one of the biggest commercial holidays

  • in the United States, the cancellation of Christmas will be disastrous to its economy.

  • So what do we do? Call it a winter Holiday!

  • So here's the question: “Can you still say Merry Christmas?”, which is the next

  • PAA we are gonna talk about.

  • The answer of this PAA is extracted from an article titledUsing Merry Christmas or

  • Happy Holidays is no longer about putting a stranger at easepublished by NBC News

  • in 2019 written by Melissa Mohr, author ofHoly Sh*t: A Brief History of Swearing.”

  • According to Melissa, when we greet and take leave of people, we rely on what linguists

  • call "phatic speech".

  • These are expressions that, as sociolinguist Peter Trudgill puts it, “establish and maintain

  • good social relations, without necessarily communicating any information.”

  • When we say things likeplease,” “thank youandHow are you?” we are greasing

  • the social wheels that indicating that we are positively disposed toward our interlocutor

  • and that we know and abide by norms of politeness.

  • Until quite recently, “Happy Christmaswas one of these phatic expressions, a December

  • alternative toSee you later!” andHave a good day!”

  • Today, however, The choice between sticking with the traditional salutationMerry Christmasand

  • the more political correct oneHappy Holidaysreveals your political stance.

  • Merry Christmasmeans that you're likely a conservative and comfortable with

  • Christianity as the default.

  • Happy Holidaysindicates, “I am a liberal and try very hard to be inclusive,

  • but I still want to wish you a Merry Christmas.”

  • What is interesting is that this article also talked about

  • the differences between "Merry Christmas" and "Happy Cristmas"

  • According to the author, In Britain, this reveals your social status.

  • Though happy and merry are synonyms, they actually have different connotations.

  • Merry implies a degree of revelry that is missing from happy,

  • , which tends more toward quiet contentment.

  • When you make merry, you're doing a lot of drinking, dancing, eating rich food and playing games.

  • “I am happymeans you are pleased; “I am merrymeans you are drunk.

  • For some reason, The British upper classes either objected to merry's echoes of debauchery

  • or thought that it had become too middle class by the time King George V

  • gave the first Royal Christmas message on the radio in 1932.

  • On that occasion, he wished his subjects a “Happy Christmas,” and upper-class Brits

  • have been saying it that way ever since.

  • Are you proudly middle class?

  • Then by all means go withMerry Christmas!”

  • An aristocrat or a social climber?

  • Happy Christmas!”

  • A posh person who feels guilty about sounding posh?

  • Then go ack toMerry!”

  • Also, the winter holiday is not necessarily referring to Christmas you know , according to an article

  • titled"Why is Christmas Day on the 25th December?" published by whychristmas.com which appears

  • to be a website dedicated to Christmas related information.

  • There are several holidays that associated with winters other than Christmas,

  • those holidays includes but not limited to : Yule in Scandinavia

  • Roman Festival of Saturnali, and of course Hanukkah.

  • So the winter holiday is not necessarily referring to Christmas, but for some people, Christmas just has to

  • be “a winter holiday”, that's why Australians celebrate Christmas in July.

  • Which leads to our next PAAWhat is Christmas in July in Australia?”

  • The answer is extracted from an article titledWHY AUSTRALIANS CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS IN JULY

  • which published by Christmas world, which is a company selling Christmas decorations.

  • Here are some excerpts from this article:

  • Australians get to celebrate Christmas twice a year.

  • Once on the traditional December 25th, and then once again in July.

  • The reason this is done is that December down under is anything but cold.

  • So instead of being huddled by the fire, drinking hot chocolate, Australians head to the beach

  • or have a day outside in the sun.

  • Then when July finally rolls around, this is when Australians celebrate Christmas in

  • the traditional sense since it's colder.

  • Although we know it as Christmas in July, Australians call this second celebration Yuletide or Yulefest.

  • Since it's colder in July down under, Christmas can finally be celebrated with drinks by the

  • fire and getting cozy in warm attire. Alright let's recap!

  • Today we learned that the way you greet people in December might reveal your social status or your political stance

  • But no matter what you are still running a risk of offending people anyway.

  • Australians get to celebrate Christmas twice, and the second celebration they call it Yuletide or Yulefest.

  • Today's question is: How do you greet people in December? And did that ever offend anyone?

  • Let me know your experiences, bye.

Hi everyone, today's keyword is Chris...I mean, winter holiday.

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"メリークリスマス "と "ハッピーホリデー "と "ハッピークリスマス "の違い (The differences between "Merry Christmas", "Happy Holiday" and "Happy Christmas")

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    Shao Chieh Lo に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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