Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • When Joseph Johnson went to vote in his first presidential election...

    ジョセフ・ジョンソンが最初の大統領選挙に投票に行った時に

  • this isn't what he expected.

    これは彼が期待していたものではありません。

  • The line went this way, in front of our auditorium...

    講堂前の列はこちらへ...

  • and then snaked around into our library.

    と書斎に蛇行してきました。

  • The last person at his polling location didn't get to vote until 1 am.

    彼の投票所の最後の人は深夜1時まで投票に行かなかった。

  • It was the longest line that I've waited in in my entire life.

    ずっと待っていた中で一番長い行列でした。

  • Some people, they were just like, "well, screw it."

    "もういいや "って人もいたけど

  • This was in a heavily Democratic part of Houston, Texas.

    テキサス州ヒューストンの民主党政権下でのことです。

  • And it was a primary election, where Democrats and Republicans were voting on separate machines.

    しかも、民主党と共和党が別々の機械で投票していた小選挙区だった。

  • But the county had given both parties the same number of machines to use.

    しかし、郡は双方に同じ数の機械を使用するように与えていた。

  • Also, Texas had closed hundreds of polling locations in recent years,

    また、テキサス州は近年、数百か所の投票所を閉鎖していた。

  • meaning more people had to vote at fewer places.

    より多くの人がより少ない場所で投票しなければならなかったことを意味しています。

  • But not everyone has to wait.

    しかし、誰もが待たなければならないわけではありません。

  • This is a map of all the polling locations in Joseph's county that had reports of long lines.

    これは、長蛇の列が報告されていたジョセフ郡の全投票所の地図です。

  • And here's the percentage of nonwhite voters in each area.

    そして、各地域の非白人有権者の割合です。

  • Notice how most places with lines were in less-white areas?

    線のある場所のほとんどが白さが足りない場所にあったことに気づくかな?

  • The poll closures, and the other decisions that led to those lines,

    世論調査の閉鎖とか、そのセリフにつながった他の決定事項。

  • disproportionately affected people of color.

    有色人種の人々に不釣り合いに影響を与えています。

  • And whether or not that was intentional, those kinds of decisions, in places like Texas,

    それが故意かどうかは別にして、テキサスのような場所では、このような決定が行われています。

  • used to be highly regulated and much less frequent.

    以前は規制が厳しく、使用頻度もかなり低かった。

  • Today, that oversight is gone.

    今日では、その見落としがなくなりました。

  • But the 2020 election could decide whether it comes back.

    しかし、2020年の選挙で復活するかどうかが決まるかもしれません。

  • This is the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama.

    アラバマ州セルマにあるエドマンド・ペタス橋です。

  • In 1965, a group of civil rights activists, including the future congressman John Lewis,

    1965年、後のジョン・ルイス下院議員をはじめとする公民権運動家のグループ。

  • marched across the bridge, and were attacked and beaten by police.

    橋を渡って行進し、警察に襲われて殴られた。

  • They were marching for voting rights.

    彼らは投票権を求めて行進していました。

  • Back then, especially in the segregated South,

    当時は特に南部では隔離されていた

  • there was rampant voter suppression of Black Americans.

    黒人の有権者弾圧が横行していた。

  • It started back when the 15th Amendment granted Black men the right to vote in 1870.

    1870年に修正第15条で黒人に投票権が与えられたのが始まりです。

  • That right was enforced by federal troops, who occupied the southern states

    その権利は、南部の州を占領した連邦軍によって行使されました。

  • during a period known asReconstruction.”

    "復興 "と呼ばれる時期に

  • But what happened after Reconstruction, was that the states passed a number of laws

    しかし、復興後に何が起こったかというと、各州がいくつかの法律を可決したことです。

  • that effectively disenfranchised African Americans.

    アフリカ系アメリカ人の権利を事実上奪った

  • Of course, no law could sayno Black people can vote” — it had to be a little sneakier.

    もちろん、「黒人は投票できない」という法律はなかった--もう少し卑劣なものでなければならなかった。

  • Like the "grandfather clause," where you could only vote if your grandfather could vote.

    祖父が投票できないと投票できないという「祖父条項」みたいな。

  • Which is impossible if your grandfather was a slave.

    あなたの祖父が奴隷だったなら ありえないわ

  • There were literacy tests, where voters, mostly Black voters,

    黒人を中心とした有権者を対象としたリテラシーテストが行われていた。

  • had to answer bizarre questions before they were allowed to vote.

    奇妙な質問に答えなければならなかった。

  • Not just tests to see whether or not you could read,

    読めるかどうかのテストだけじゃなくて

  • but things like, could you recite the state's constitution?

    憲法を暗唱してくれないか?

  • And poll taxes, requiring voters, again mostly Black voters, to pay to be allowed to vote.

    そして世論調査の税金は、有権者に、またしてもほとんどが黒人の有権者に、投票を許可するための支払いを要求しています。

  • They selectively chose who had to abide by these rules.

    彼らはこれらのルールに従わなければならない人を選択した。

  • In the 1950s and 60s, Congress passed several civil rights laws

    1950年代から60年代にかけて、議会はいくつかの公民権法を可決しました。

  • that attempted to protect voting rights, getting rid of things like poll taxes.

    選挙権を守ろうとしたことで 世論調査のようなものを 排除しようとした

  • Still, by 1964, in Mississippi, barely 7% of nonwhite Americans could vote.

    それでも、1964年までにミシシッピ州では、白人以外のアメリカ人のわずか7%が投票できるようになった。

  • Selma's Bloody Sunday drew attention to that.

    セルマの「ブラッディ・サンデー」が注目を集めました。

  • It made Americansand Congresswonder if local officials,

    それはアメリカ人に-そして議会に-地元の役人が疑問を抱かせた。

  • like these guys,

    こいつらのように

  • could really be trusted to enforce these new civil rights laws.

    これらの新しい民権法を施行することは、本当に信頼できるのでしょうか。

  • So Congress wrote another one.

    それで議会は別のものを書いた。

  • Ten days after Selma, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was introduced.

    セルマから10日後、1965年の投票権法が導入された。

  • It added additional protections, got rid of literacy tests...

    追加の保護を加え、識字率テストを廃止し...

  • But it also had a way to prevent any other creative changes:

    しかし、それは他の創造的な変化を防ぐ方法も持っていました。

  • State governments had to submit their changes to the federal government for approval.

    州政府はその変更点を連邦政府に提出して承認を得なければならなかった。

  • The Voting Rights Act identified parts of the country that had a history of voter discrimination,

    投票権法は、有権者差別の歴史を持つ国の一部を特定した。

  • mostly in the South, and set up federal oversight.

    南部を中心に、連邦政府の監視体制を整えた。

  • So if these places wanted to change anything about voting,

    だから、これらの場所が投票について何かを変えたいと思っていたら

  • like enacting a new law, or closing polling locations,

    新しい法律の制定や投票所の閉鎖のように

  • it first had to get the okay from the US Justice Department, or federal courts,

    最初にアメリカ司法省や連邦裁判所から許可を得なければなりませんでした。

  • that it wasn't discriminatory.

    差別的なものではないと

  • Immediately, nonwhite voter registration in these Southern states grew.

    直ちに、これら南部の州では非白人の有権者登録が増加した。

  • Like in Mississippi, where it went from barely 7% to almost 60% in just three years.

    ミシシッピの時のように、かろうじて7%からわずか3年で60%近くになったところで

  • The Voting Rights Act did what earlier civil rights laws hadn't.

    投票権法は、以前の公民権法がやっていないことをやった。

  • But in 2013, the Supreme Courtwith a majority of Republican-appointed judges

    しかし、2013年には、共和党が任命した裁判官の過半数を擁する最高裁が

  • took on a case about the Voting Rights Act.

    選挙権法の件を引き受けた。

  • They decided that the way the law calculated which states would have that federal oversight

    彼らは、どの州が連邦政府の監視を受けるかを計算した法律の方法を決定しました。

  • was outdated and therefore unconstitutional.

    は時代遅れであり、それゆえに違憲であった。

  • "No one doubts that there is still voting discrimination in the South and in the rest of the country.

    "南部にも南部以外の地域にも未だに投票差別があることを疑う人はいない。

  • We do, however, find that the coverage formula in Section 4 violates the Constitution."

    しかし、我々は、第4条の適用式が憲法に違反していることを発見する"

  • Almost immediately, voting laws that had previously been denied for being discriminatory

    ほぼすぐに、それまで差別的だと否定されていた投票法が

  • were enacted in these states.

    がこれらの州で制定されました。

  • Literally the same day as the Supreme Court's decision, Texas did just that,

    最高裁の判決と同じ日に、テキサス州では文字通り、そのようなことが行われました。

  • announcing a voter ID law that a federal judge had previously rejected,

    連邦判事が拒否した有権者ID法を発表した

  • because it was "the most stringent in the country,"

    "国内で最も厳しい "からだ

  • andimposed strict, unforgiving burdens on the poor."

    "貧乏人には厳しく容赦ない重荷を課した"

  • Other states enacted voter ID laws, too.

    他の州でも有権者ID法が制定されています。

  • Along with other measures that had previously been stopped, like purging voter rolls,

    有権者名簿の粛清のような、以前に停止されていた他の措置と一緒に。

  • and closing polling locations:

    と投票所を閉鎖します。

  • 1,173 places in total.

    合計1,173箇所。

  • 750 just in Texas.

    テキサスだけで750

  • An analysis by the Guardian looked at the 50 Texas counties

    ガーディアン紙による分析では、テキサス州の50の郡を調べました。

  • that gained the most Black and Hispanic residents from 2012-2018,

    2012年から2018年の間に最も多くの黒人とヒスパニック系住民を獲得した。

  • and the 50 Texas counties that gained the fewest Black and Hispanic residents.

    と、黒人とヒスパニック系の住民を最も少なく獲得したテキサス州の50郡を紹介しています。

  • In these counties, the combined population fell by 13,000 over that time.

    これらの郡では、その間に総人口が1万3千人減少した。

  • And 34 of their polling places were closed.

    そして彼らの投票所のうち34か所は閉鎖されていた。

  • In these counties, the combined population grew by 2.5 million people.

    これらの郡では、合計で250万人の人口が増加しました。

  • But 542 of their polling places were closed.

    しかし、彼らの投票所のうち542箇所は閉鎖されていた。

  • Many officials in these states say changes like these aren't intended to disenfranchise specific voters.

    これらの州の多くの当局者は、このような変更は特定の有権者の権利を剥奪することを意図したものではないと述べています。

  • But there's no way to really know.

    でも、本当のところはわからないんですよね。

  • What we do know is that almost all these states' governments are controlled by Republicans.

    分かっているのは、これらの州の政府のほとんどが共和党員によって支配されているということです。

  • And the groups who tend to be disenfranchised by these changes are more often poor people

    そして、これらの変化によって権利を剥奪されがちなグループは、貧しい人々であることが多い。

  • and people of color.

    とカラーの人たち。

  • Most of whom tend to vote Democratic.

    そのほとんどが民主党に投票する傾向がある。

  • Even when they're saying it's not, it's very hard to believe that, in fact,

    そうではないと言われても、実際にはとても信じられません。

  • they didn't have a strategic discussion

    戦略的な議論はしていない

  • about how they could minimize the Democratic Party's vote.

    民主党の票をどうやって最小化するかについて

  • In the Supreme Court decision, the Chief Justice told Congress it's okay to have oversight,

    最高裁の判決では、最高裁長官は議会に監督権があってもいいと言った。

  • just don't base it on old data.

    古いデータを元にするなよ

  • "Congress must ensure that the legislation it passes speaks to current conditions."

    "議会は法案が現状に即したものであることを確認しなければならない"

  • And so in 2019, the House of Representatives did just that,

    それで2019年には下院がそれをやってくれました。

  • passing a new bill to update the criteria for which states get federal oversight.

    州が連邦政府の監視を受ける基準を更新するための新しい法案を可決した。

  • John Lewis, then a congressman in his 17th term, presided over the vote.

    当時17期目の下院議員だったジョン・ルイスが投票を主宰。

  • But the bill passed almost entirely along party lines.

    しかし、法案はほとんど党派に沿って可決された。

  • Almost no Republicans voted for it, and nearly every Democrat did.

    共和党はほとんど投票せず、民主党はほぼ全員が投票した。

  • Then the bill moved to the Republican-held Senate, where it isn't going to get a vote.

    法案は共和党が保持する上院に移ったそこでは採決されないだろう

  • And even if it does pass the Senate, the Trump White House has threatened to veto it,

    そして、仮に上院を通過したとしても、トランプ・ホワイトハウスは拒否権を行使すると脅しています。

  • arguing the oversight is unnecessary.

    見落としは不要だと主張している。

  • But the House, Senate and White House are all up for grabs in the 2020 election.

    しかし、2020年の選挙では、下院、上院、ホワイトハウスのすべてが掌握されています。

  • And this is one of the many areas the two presidential candidates have polar opposite views:

    そして、これは2人の大統領候補者が極論を唱えている多くの分野の1つです。

  • "Pass the bill to restore the Voting Rights Act.

    "選挙権法を復活させる法案を可決せよ

  • It's one of the first things I'll do as president if elected."

    "大統領に選ばれたら最初にやることの一つだ"

  • In 2020, John Lewis died.

    2020年、ジョン・ルイスが亡くなりました。

  • The bill whose passage he'd presided over was renamed in his memory.

    彼が主宰していた法案は彼の記憶の中で改名された。

  • If the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act becomes law,

    ジョン・ルイス投票権推進法が法制化されれば

  • its formula would restore federal oversight for several states.

    その公式は、いくつかの州のための連邦政府の監視を回復することになります。

  • Including Texas.

    テキサスを含む。

  • It's like, if there are no rules to the game,

    ゲームにルールがなければ、という感じです。

  • then no one can really play the game.

    となると、誰も本当にゲームをすることができません。

When Joseph Johnson went to vote in his first presidential election...

ジョセフ・ジョンソンが最初の大統領選挙に投票に行った時に

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 Vox 投票 有権 テキサス 連邦 黒人

アメリカの長い投票線の本当の意味 (What long voting lines in the US really mean)

  • 11 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2020 年 09 月 17 日
動画の中の単語