Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Juneteenth is a deeply emotional moment for enslaved people,

    ジュンティーンは奴隷にされた人々にとって、深い感慨深い瞬間です。

  • because, for decades, for centuries,

    なぜなら、何十年も何百年も

  • enslaved people, prayed for, hoped for, fought for in the form of slave rebellions, running

    祈願反乱

  • away, bought their freedom when they could.

    自由を手に入れた

  • And if you read slave narratives, if you listen to spirituals from the era of slavery,

    奴隷物語を読んでも、奴隷時代のスピリチュアルな話を聞いても

  • you know that enslaved people longed for freedom.

    奴隷にされた人たちは自由に憧れていたことを知っていますね。

  • (voices singing) Let my people go.

    (歌声) 私の民を解放してください

  • This was something that had been hoped for but many believed may never come.

    これは期待されていたことですが、多くの人が来ないかもしれないと信じていました。

  • (voices singing) Let my people go.

    (歌声) 私の民を解放してください

  • Being able to go wherever they wanted. Being able to wander about; for enslaved people,

    好きなところに行くことができたことさまようことができたこと;奴隷にされた人々のために。

  • it was an expression of their freedom.

    それは彼らの自由の表現だった

  • When I think about Juneteenth, I think about it in the context of Emancipation Day celebrations

    ジュンティーンといえば、奴隷解放の日のお祝いの文脈で考えてしまいます。

  • that began Jan 1, 1863 and took on a whole new meaning when slavery was formerly abolished

    奴隷制度廃止

  • after 1865.

    1865年以降

  • You would have had African American veterans who fought in the Civil War be prominent in

    南北戦争で戦ったアフリカ系アメリカ人の退役軍人が目立っていたでしょう。

  • these celebrations, dressed in their military garb.

    軍服に身を包んだ祝賀会です。

  • Speeches from enslaved people, the most prominent Black politicians, singing of hymns,

    奴隷にされた人々のスピーチ、黒人の著名な政治家のスピーチ、賛美歌の歌唱。

  • spirituals, discussions of registering to vote.

    スピリチュアル、投票に登録するための議論。

  • Enslaved people celebrating, in public, their newfound freedom, was an act of resistance.

    奴隷にされた人々が自由を手に入れたことを公の場で祝うことは、抵抗の行為だったのです。

  • Because we have to remember, slavery came to an end after a four years bloody, bloody civil

    奴隷制度は4年間の血まみれの市民運動の後に終わった

  • war. Still the bloodiest conflict in American history.

    "戦争未だにアメリカ史上最も血なまぐさい争いだ

  • Many people in the South and in the nation, who didn't want to see slavery abolished,

    南部や国では、奴隷制の廃止を望まない人が多かった。

  • fought tooth and nail to block the 13th amendment.

    修正13条を阻止するために闘った

  • (voices singing) Coming for to carry me home.

    (歌声) 家に運びに来たのよ

  • The abolition of slavery created a huge humanitarian crisis in the South.

    奴隷制度の廃止は、南部に大きな人道的危機をもたらした。

  • Suddenly, four million people have very little means to take care of themselves, to support

    突然、400万人の人々は、自分の面倒を見る手段がほとんどありません。

  • themselves, and do so in a really, really hostile environment.

    自分自身のことを考えて、本当に本当に敵対的な環境の中でそうする。

  • So the military was necessary to make sure that enslaved people got the food, the medicine,

    だから、奴隷になった人たちが食料や薬を手に入れるために軍が必要だったのです。

  • the shelter that they needed in order to survive.

    生きていくために必要なシェルター。

  • They're also there to protect, to the extent that that was possible, freed people

    彼らは、それが可能な範囲で、自由になった人々を守るためにも存在しています。

  • from violence, from recriminations from slave holders, from Confederates who still hadn't

    暴力から 奴隷所有者からの逆恨みから 解放されなかった南部連合軍から

  • given up the fight.

    戦いを放棄した。

  • When the last Federal troops leave the South, its a signal to southerners that the Federal government

    最後の連邦軍が南部を離れるとき、それは南部の人々に連邦政府が

  • wasn't going to put its might into ensuring the civil rights of black people would be

    黒人の公民権の確保に力を入れようとしなかったら

  • observed.

    を観察しました。

  • You have, 20, 30 years later, Black people being lynched in public, and there isn't

    20年後、30年後、黒人が公共の場でリンチされても

  • a federal anti- lynching law to protect them.

    彼らを守るための連邦の反リンチ法。

  • In most communities in America, there is a history of lynching and racial violence, and

    アメリカのほとんどのコミュニティでは、リンチや人種的暴力の歴史があり

  • very few communities have marked that, commemorated that.

    それを記念して、それをマークしている地域はほとんどありません。

  • Every decade since the end of slavery, Black people have been more educated, accrued more

    奴隷制度が終わってから10年ごとに、黒人はより多くの教育を受け、より多くの収入を得るようになりました。

  • wealth, more status in American society,

    富、アメリカ社会での地位向上

  • every decade since 1865.

    1865年から10年ごとに

  • But, there's been one constant, and that constant is

    しかし、1つの定数があり、その定数は

  • the presence of random racist violence.

    無作為な人種差別的暴力の存在

  • What I see in George Floyd's murder was a white police officer attempting to dominate

    ジョージ・フロイドの殺人事件で私が見たのは 白人警官が支配しようとして

  • and to subdue a black man who was not resisting, who could not resist.

    と、抵抗できなかった黒人を服従させるために

  • Even though slavery came to an end in 1865, the desire to master and dominate black bodies

    1865年に奴隷制度が終了したにもかかわらず、黒人の体を支配し、支配したいという欲求は

  • do not. And we have never dealt with that.

    しないでくださいそして、それに対処したことはありません。

  • These are the kind of stark realities that are highlighted during Juneteenth

    ジュンテーンの間に浮き彫りにされているのは、このような厳しい現実です。

  • If Black people's lives can be expunged through racist violence,

    人種差別的な暴力で黒人の命が消されるのであれば

  • and no one is held accountable,

    そして、誰も責任を取らない。

Juneteenth is a deeply emotional moment for enslaved people,

ジュンティーンは奴隷にされた人々にとって、深い感慨深い瞬間です。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 Vox 黒人 南部 制度 リンチ 歌声

すべてのアメリカ人がジューンティーンを称えるべき理由 (Why all Americans should honor Juneteenth)

  • 7 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2020 年 08 月 29 日
動画の中の単語