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  • Hi, welcome to www.engvid.com , I'm Adam.

  • In today's video, I want to talk to you about word stress and intonation to help you with

  • your listening but also with your speaking of English in a more natural way.

  • Okay?

  • I'm going to start with an example to show you what I'm talking about.

  • "Tom asked Lisa out."

  • Very simple sentence, but I want you to listen to the different ways I say it.

  • "Tom asked Lisa out."

  • "Tom asked Lisa out."

  • "Tom asked Lisa out."

  • "Tom asked Lisa out."

  • "Tom asked Lisa out."

  • Each way I said it has a slightly different meaning, because I gave different stress to

  • each word.

  • If I say, "Tom asked Lisa out", it means not Frank, not Bill, not John, Tom.

  • I'm stressing Tom, because that's who I want you to understand did this action.

  • Tom asked Lisa out, not Jane, not Kathy, not anybody else, right?

  • So, the word stress is actually very important.

  • Again, both in listening and in speaking.

  • Now, I did - I made a lesson about word stress a long time ago, one of my earliest lessons.

  • But you can catch the description - the link in the description box.

  • And Emma also made a very good video about word stress.

  • So, I highly recommend you watch those and keep those in mind with what I'm going to

  • talk to you about here.

  • Now, what I have here are poems, essentially.

  • This one is a nursery rhyme, and this one is rap, okay?

  • Both of these are very good ways to practice your listening skills in terms of word stress

  • and intonation.

  • Now, word stress is basically - basically punching on words when you land on them.

  • You give a little bit more emphasis to them, or you slow down on them, etc.

  • And this conveys a lot of meaning to the listener, okay?

  • And intonation is more about the speed and the flow and the pace of the sentence, okay?

  • Now, rhyme, before I go on - rhyme is basically a tool that you use that words and the sentence

  • and the word sound the same.

  • For example, "wool" and "full" sound the same, okay?

  • "Dame" and "lane", more or less, not exactly, but I'll explain that in a second.

  • So, we're using rhyme in order to create flow, to create stress.

  • Now, a good tool for you to use - and again, you can just go on Google or any search engine

  • and just type into the search engine "rhyming dictionary".

  • Now, these are very good tools in terms of pronunciation but also gives you a lot of

  • different words to use in terms of creating your own poems, which again, I'm going to

  • talk about at the end.

  • So, let me read this out to you first, okay?

  • Baa, Baa, black sheep

  • Have you any wool?

  • Yes sir, yes sir

  • Three bags full

  • One for the master

  • And one for the dame

  • And one for the little boy

  • Who lives down the lane

  • Okay?

  • Notice that I change my speed a little bit with each line.

  • Why?

  • Because I want to make sure that we match in terms of - I match them in terms of intonation.

  • "Baa, baa, black sheep."

  • I have four syllables.

  • "Have you any wool?"

  • Now here, I have five.

  • So, in order for them to fit together, I have to speed up a little bit on the second one

  • to match the pace of the first one.

  • "Baa, baa, black sheep, have you any wool?"

  • Right?

  • I have to squeeze the words a little bit and go a little bit faster so they basically match

  • in terms of tone and intonation.

  • "Yes sir, yes sir, three bags full."

  • One, two, one, two, one, two, three, right?

  • Four and three.

  • So, I'm going shorter, faster, shorter, faster.

  • That gives me a lot of speed.

  • Now, English is a very musical language.

  • And a lot of meaning comes across in the music of the way you speak and what you hear.

  • Okay?

  • So, nursery rhymes are a good way to practice that.

  • Now, notice here, "dame" and "lane", they're not exactly the same.

  • This is an m, this is an n.

  • M and N are close enough that we consider it a rhyme.

  • But more importantly, I have "ay".

  • Let's put it like this, ay, ay.

  • So, the syllable sound is the same, so therefore we can consider it a rhyme.

  • Now, I'm sure many of you have at least heard of Eminem, the rapper.

  • Okay?

  • This is from one of his songs:

  • His palms are sweaty, knees weak, arms are heavy

  • There's vomit on his sweater already, mom's spaghetti

  • He's nervous, but on the surface, he looks calm and ready

  • So, he has a very choppy approach to his rap, okay?

  • Now, I'm not a rapper.

  • I'm not going to do it the way that he does it exactly, but you get the idea.

  • I'm jumping from one word that I'm stressing - sweaty, his weak arms are heavy.

  • T and V obviously don't rhyme, T and V, but "swe", "he", I have the same syllable.

  • And the main thing I'm doing is I'm punching on this word.

  • His palms are sweaty, knees weak.

  • Very light.

  • Arms are heavy, right?

  • So, I punch on the word and that way, the listener hears it and makes the connection

  • automatically.

  • "Sweaty" is pronounced like a D, so words that end with "ty" often sound like "d", "sweady",

  • not "sweaty", "sweady".

  • And then "sweaty", I have "spaghetti", also sounds like a "d".

  • "Already" and "ready".

  • And here, I have "nervous" and "surface", right?

  • So, he uses a lot of rhyme to move his story along, bring the listener in with him, and

  • he punches on the words that he wants you to hear.

  • Now, rap is actually very difficult to understand.

  • Even native speakers can't understand a lot of rap, sometimes.

  • Depends how fast they are, the words they use, etc.

  • But still good practice.

  • Now, you can also go and do a search online for lyrics, okay?

  • Song lyrics are a very good way to practice your listening.

  • A little bit of warning, don't try to learn grammar from songs, okay?

  • Musicians will often play with their grammar in order to fit the rhyme or to fit the music,

  • basically, the melody.

  • So, don't learn grammar, but learn pace.

  • Learn word stress.

  • Learn intonation.

  • Learn flow, okay?

  • Because the singers will want you to focus on particular words and you have to pay attention

  • to those words.

  • Now, not all songs rhyme, but they all have a certain rhyming melody, right?

  • One line might not rhyme with another line, but you know that these two are somehow connected

  • because they stressed something, right?

  • And they move the pace along, like "Baa, baa, black sheep/Have you any wool?"

  • So, obviously, focusing on sheep and wool.

  • "Yes sir, yes sir" Very quick, very light.

  • I'm not punching on anything.

  • "Three bags full", right?

  • I want you to hear, like I have a lot of wool.

  • The little sheep has a lot of wool.

  • So, this is very good for you to practice, but it doesn't have to be nursery rhymes.

  • Some people don't like them.

  • Doesn't have to be rap, some people don't like that.

  • Let me show you something else.

  • So now, another very famous rapper for you, okay?

  • Parting is such sweet sorrow

  • That I should say good night 'till it be morrow

  • Now, he's not actually a rapper.

  • He's William Shakespeare, he's a poet.

  • He wrote this, okay?

  • If you want to really study beautiful English and beautiful poetry and beautiful rhyme and

  • beautiful intonation, study Shakespeare.

  • He's the master at it.

  • You can learn a lot from him.

  • "Parting is such sweet sorrow/That I shall say good night, till it be morrow" right?

  • So, learn how he's playing with the intonation, how he's playing with the pace.

  • What words he's punching.

  • He is obviously going to punch the rhyming words, but he's going to - he has to basically

  • force the other words to reach that position where the rhyme actually works and the musicality

  • of it works.

  • And again, if you think this is not how people speak, it's very much how people speak.

  • They control the pace of their language.

  • They control what they speed up on, because they want to just - it's not that important.

  • They show down on what they want you to hear, and they punch the words that they really

  • want you to hear and focus on, okay?

  • Now, another good thing you can do is write your own little poetry.

  • It'll help you with your pronunciation, because you have to find words that rhyme.

  • And it'll help you create sentences or lines that basically have a matching flow, okay?

  • I met a girl, her name was Grace

  • With an angel's voice and a lovely face

  • So, I want to make sure that I'm falling on the same amount.

  • Now, a different number of syllables, but commas are also your friend.

  • Commas are little pauses, right?

  • "I met a girl, her name was Grace/With an angel's voice and a lovely face".

  • Because I have more syllables and I have to squeeze them in, I don't have room for a comma.

  • So, I have to speed it up a little bit and everything works together, right?

  • I asked her out to a bar called "Frank's"

  • She said, "You're sweet, but no thanks."

  • Okay?

  • So, this is a little poem.

  • I wrote it just for this lesson, okay?

  • I hope you guys like it.

  • But again, all I'm doing is just playing with the flow, playing with the words, making sure

  • that "Grace" and "face" and "Frank's" and "face" all work and that when you get to those

  • ending words, you're not tripping over the line because it's too fast or too slow.

  • Now, a very good thing to do also, in terms of pronunciation, if you come across a word

  • and you're not too sure.

  • Of course, you can look up in the dictionary and it will give you the phonetic spelling.

  • But if you don't like the phonetic spelling and you prefer a more creative or a more fun

  • way to find out how to pronounce words, put this into a rhyming dictionary and find out

  • other words that sound like it that you already know how to pronounce, and you'll figure it

  • out.

  • So, this word: wound.

  • There are two ways to pronounce this word.

  • "Wound", like the past tense of "wind".

  • So, for those of you who have a watch - I don't wear a watch, but if you have an old-fashioned

  • watch, you have to wind it every once in awhile so that it works properly.

  • The past tense is "wound".

  • Sound - wound, sound.

  • But if I take a gun and I shoot somebody, I will wound that person.

  • Tuned, like your guitar needs to be tuned, your piano needs to be tuned.

  • Wound - sound.

  • Wound - tuned.

  • Two different ways to pronounce the same word.

  • Completely unrelated meanings.

  • "Doubt" with a silent "b".

  • Doubt, out, drought.

  • Now, I actually made a lesson about how to pronounce words with "ough" or "augh", especially

  • with a "t".

  • You can use the rhyming to do that.

  • Doubt - out - drought.

  • Freight - great, right?

  • So, you can use rhymes to learn pronunciation, and then create your own little poems to practice

  • your speed, your intonation, your stresses, etc.

  • To convey a meaning that you want to convey.

  • Okay?

  • So, I hope this was a little bit helpful.

  • I hope it's a little bit fun for you to try to do this yourself.

  • If you have any questions about this lesson, please go to www.engvid.com and ask me in

  • the comment section there.

  • There's also a quiz that you can practice some of this information to make sure you

  • understand it.

  • If you like this video, please subscribe to my YouTube channel and come back for more

  • great videos on English.

  • See you then.

  • Bye!

Hi, welcome to www.engvid.com , I'm Adam.

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英語をより自然に話す。韻を使って単語の強調とイントネーションを表現する (Speak English more naturally: Using rhyme for word stress and intonation)

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    Summer に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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