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  • Can you talk about the day you got shot And what what happened?

  • What you learned and how you had to really fight pretty hard to even come back.

  • Yeah.

  • I mean, it's far less of a Hollywood tale than most people might think.

  • The we were working for weeks before that evening, and everything had pretty much gone as planned before then.

  • There was nothing particularly amazing about the target that we were going on of the people that we were looking for and nothing happened that night leading up to it that seemed incredibly abnormal.

  • So I equate it to going to places like Las Vegas, where you watch somebody playing craps and their role in the right number after the right number.

  • After the right number, all the casino really needs to do is keep you in that building for long enough.

  • And at some point you're gonna throw seven and you're gonna crap out statistically in a combat occupation where you're facing up against other human beings that have a vote and they can shoot back at you.

  • I think at some point you know you're going to reach a statistical point where you're on the wrong side of the dice and I thought a lot about in the days after I got shot, whether or not I had done something wrong or if I had been in a position where I shouldn't have been Or maybe I made too much noise.

  • The reality is, um I didn't I was using cover and concealment.

  • I happened to turn my head.

  • I was I was basically approaching a door and we were going to set a breaching charge on a door.

  • And I was you know, that somebody is placing explosives on the door, You don't have somebody up there with with them with a gun because their hands or task occupied with their explosive charge.

  • But there was a door behind me and our window behind me, and before I was gonna turn my back to it, I wanted to look in it.

  • And as I shifted my head, somebody shot at me from Ah, window near the door and it came down to they saw me before I saw them.

  • They were able to shoot before I was able to shoot back, and it literally and figuratively slammed me on my back.

  • I was medevacked out of the country within 48 hours.

  • I was starting my journey back to the United States.

  • Took a little bit longer than that to get back to the United States.

  • But that wheel of the military kept on spinning.

  • I didn't see any of the guys that I was working with in the hospital in Iraq.

  • I got medevacked with another guy that was on target with me.

  • He went a different direction because he was in the Army.

  • I was in the Navy, so we went back two different duty stations and I got home.

  • And I was left to my own devices to try to figure out my own rehab and recovery, because at that time in 2000 and five, in my opinion, the U.

  • S military was not as prepared as they could have been for the number of casualties and injuries that they would sustain later on.

  • And I don't fault them for that.

  • I just don't think we knew what we were getting into.

  • So I had a lot of time on my on my own with a lot of pill bottles, and I was in a lot of neuropathic pain.

  • So I went down a rabbit hole a little bit.

  • I don't know if I would call it addiction, but I certainly would call abuse of the medications that they were giving me.

  • And I think a lot of it was driven because I didn't have a sense of purpose anymore.

  • I didn't know if I was going to be able to operate at the level that I was operating up before.

  • I didn't know House.

  • If you're gonna be able to stay at the command that I was at before and the people that I was with, they were still overseas, operating at an incredibly high level, which is where I wanted to be.

  • So it's very physically challenging from the pain perspective, but probably even more so emotionally and mentally challenging and having toe deal with all that.

  • And it took me about a year to get my head turned on correctly reoriented in the direction that I wanted to go, and that actually started for me.

  • Physically.

  • I just forced myself to go into the gym and start working out and by physically exhausting myself, I was able to get myself to mentally and emotionally.

  • Just relax a little bit and I started sleeping better.

  • And that's it's kind of a narrative that is stuck with me for the rest of my life.

  • Like I have to be physical and what I'm doing for an enhanced mental and emotional state.

  • The two are just intrinsically tied for me.

  • But it was a very long path.

  • Back took me about a year and 1/2 to get back on full active duty, and then I went to a training command on the West Coast.

  • I left the command that I was at when I got shot, went to a training command on the West Coast and then did one more deployment in 2000 and 10.

  • So I went from working at a really high level to being at the basement to getting myself back up to a deployable status did one more.

  • I think a lot of that was for me to prove to myself that I was gonna be able to do it again, and then that time came shortly after that that my body just really wasn't physically able to do the job anymore.

  • Wow!

  • And what would the extent of your injuries Where did you get hit.

  • And how did you have to, like rehab yourself?

  • So the rehab.

  • I mean, there's nothing much that could be done because the injury that I sustained was largely neuropathic.

  • So I got a shot in the side of the hip from about 15 feet away from an A K 47 the round either directly interacted with my cyanotic nerve or he was actually the window, had some metal rebar in it.

  • And the round probably nicked one of the pieces of rebar because as it was spinning on its way towards me, it was coming apart a little bit.

  • So it wasn't one just bullet hole kind of spackle the side of my leg.

  • So the round either clipped her, cut my psychotic nerve.

  • Or if you've ever watched ballistic gel as a bullet comes through it, it makes a little bit of ah, wave as it distorts the ballistic gel that also could have interacted with my psychotic nerd.

  • But it basically short circuited my left leg from the point of impact all the way down to the terminating point in my ankle.

  • So I was, ahem a politic.

  • For almost a year, which is basically paralysis of one side of my body.

  • And it was I was distracted during the daytime because I was focusing on whatever was going on in my day.

  • But I would lay down in bed at night and try to sleep, and I felt like my leg was just on fire.

  • It was the best description is dipping my leg, my entire leg and gasoline and then just laying in bed and lighting that on fire.

  • And it was inescapable.

  • Which, of course, took me to, you know, the pill bottles and washing it down with booze, which is not actually resting.

  • That's just passing outs.

  • That didn't help, but there really was no rehab, I was told by farm or doctors with farm or education than me.

  • I would go, and I would ask them what?

  • What can I expect?

  • And my answer would be shoulder shrug.

  • I don't know, you know, and I would look at them and say I didn't go to medical school and I don't know either.

  • So could potentially I get a different answer from you than that?

  • And they would say, a millimeter, a day and maybe an inch of month of regrowth, and hopefully at some point the nerve will start to regenerate itself.

  • But it would need to go from the point of impact all the way down to my ankle, which was a few feet away, and it never really did.

  • It stopped about 2 to 3 inches below the kneecap, so I still have some really bad residual nerve damage in my left leg.

  • Pretty, uh, pretty common occurrence for me is to roll my ankle because I have a really hard time with stabilization and muscle control.

  • So the rehab is, you know, I don't know when it became when it stopped becoming rehab, and it just started becoming.

  • This is the way that I that I live my life now.

  • But most people, it's so funny that the human body and its ability to compensate most people who don't know that I was shot would never know because my my walking gait is normal, and I just kind of know how to guard against physical activities that stress my ankle.

  • And it's not, obviously is not something.

  • I tell people like I meet him for the first time, but like hey, let's have a cup of coffee.

  • By the way, I got shot, so it's my damn.

  • I find out a year later and the most common responses.

  • They're shocked that I that I actually sustained that injury because I'm able to live a very fulfilling life and be as active as I want to be way.

Can you talk about the day you got shot And what what happened?

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それは撃たれるような感じがすること:アンディStumpfは戦争のシナリオで負傷していることの現実を暴露している (WHAT IT FEELS LIKE TO GET SHOT: Andy Stumpf Exposes The Reality Of Being Injured In A War Scenario)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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