Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Today you're transforming your spoken English by studying a scene from the movie

  • Brittany Runs a Marathon, with me. She just had a job interview, she didn't get the job.

  • But she gets a lead on her next job. We're going to go in-depth with the English used in this scene.

  • What happens to the T in interview?

  • When you study a scene like this, you'll be able to understand American movies and TV effortlessly

  • without subtitles. The best part is, not only do you get to learn and study with the video,

  • you get to train with the training section in this video, audio.

  • So that you can start to make a habit of all of these tricks you're learning.

  • You know, if you like animals, I should refer you to my sister.

  • We're doing this all summer, we started in June and we're going through August, stick with me

  • every Tuesday, they're all great scenes, and there's going to be so much to learn that can transform

  • the way you understand and speak English.

  • And as always, if you like this video, or you learn something new, please like and subscribe with notifications.

  • You're going to watch the clip, then we're going to do a full pronunciation analysis together.

  • This is going to help so much with your listening comprehension when it comes to watching

  • English movies in TV. But there's going to be a training section.

  • You're going to take what you've just learned and practice repeating it, doing a reduction,

  • flapping a T just like you learned in the analysis. Okay, here's the scene.

  • I'm so sorry.

  • No, it's fine. It's just I keep interviewing at places and no one thinks I'm the right fit.

  • Oh my goodness who is this gentleman?

  • Oh, this is a foster.

  • You know, if you like animals, I should refer you to my sister.

  • She owns a company. They do house sitting and pet sitting.

  • And now, the analysis.

  • I'm so sorry.

  • Okay so we hear someone off-camera say: I'm so sorry.

  • I'm so sorry.

  • I'm so sorry. Mmm so, I'm so sorry. And sorr-- both have a little bit of that up-down shape of stress.

  • The word I'm is reduced. It's really just the M sound, isn't it? Mmm so, mmm so, mmm so.

  • The M sound hooked right on to the S. I'm so sorry.

  • I'm so sorry.

  • No, it's fine. It's just I keep--

  • So she does a little break here, after the word keep, breaking that up into another thought group.

  • So let's look at this first thought group.

  • No, it's fine.

  • No, it's fine. Both of those have more volume.

  • No, it's fine.

  • No, it's fine.

  • It's just I keep--

  • and then the second part, we have two peaks on just and keep, but they're definitely lower. Uhhhh. Uhhh.

  • No, it's fine. It's just I keep--

  • No, it's fine. It's just I keep--

  • No, it's fine. It's just I keep--

  • No, it's fine. It's just I keep--

  • No, it's fine. We have an OH diphthong in no,

  • linking into an IH vowel. When the Oh diphthong links into another vowel or diphthong,

  • can definitely feel like we passed through a W sound,

  • the glide consonant. No it's, so you can almost think of this word as being wits, wits, no it's, no it's, No, it's fine.

  • That might help you link those together more smoothly. No, it's fine. And we have all of these sounds T, S, and F.

  • No, it's fine.

  • No, it's fine.

  • It's just I keep--

  • Fine. It's just-- fine. It's-- the ending N links right into the beginning vowel of IH.

  • And there's no break even though grammatically, that would be written as another sentence probably.

  • There's no break in sound so it still links together. No, it's fine. It's--

  • No, it's fine. It's--

  • It's just I keep, it's just I. So we have an ST cluster here followed by the AI diphthong. We do make that T.

  • If the next word was something that began with a consonant, then we would drop it.

  • But when it begins with a vowel or diphthong, we do tend to say it and link it in.

  • It's just I, juh uh uh, not really uh, not really just, but more juh uh uh uh, less jaw drop.

  • It's just I, I almost even write that as the schwa even though I am putting some length on it.

  • But it has less jaw drop than ah, uh, it's just, it's just I keep.

  • It's just I keep,

  • I keep, puts her lips together for the P, it's a stop consonant,

  • but she doesn't release it she doesn't say: keep, keep, she says: I keep.

  • I keep,

  • And that stop signifies the P. I see her lips go together but she doesn't release a puff of air.

  • I keep,

  • interviewing at places and--

  • Interviewing at places and, another break here, breaking it up into another thought group.

  • Interviewing, stress on the first syllable there. Interviewing at places and--

  • Interviewing at places and--

  • Interviewing at places and--

  • Interviewing at places and--

  • We have some reductions here. Even though interviewing is

  • the stressed word, one of the stressed words,

  • the T is dropped, very common to do that in words with INTER, like internet.

  • Also in general, when a T comes after an N, it's not uncommon to drop it,

  • like in the word center. You might hear that as center,

  • and then of course, interview, international, internet. Very common to drop that T.

  • Interviewing,

  • at places and.

  • Interviewing at, at at at.

  • Do you notice the pronunciation of at? It's not at, its it ut ut,

  • Schwa, Stop T, stop T because the next word begins with a consonant.

  • Interviewing at places.

  • Interviewing at places, interviewing at places, interviewing at places

  • and--

  • Places and-- places and-- Okay so the ending S in places is a Z sound and that links into,

  • I would write it as schwa N,

  • the reduction of and, places and, zan zan zan zan. Places and--

  • Places and--

  • no one thinks I'm the right fit.

  • What are our most stressed words in this last thought group here?

  • No one thinks I'm the right fit.

  • No one thinks I'm the right fit.

  • No one thinks I'm the right fit.

  • No one, a little bit of stress there, no one thinks I'm the right fit.

  • I would say thinks and fit have the most up down shape. No and right have a little.

  • No one, no one, no one.

  • No one,

  • Make sure those really link together, it's the OH diphthong.

  • No one, and then the word one, W, UH as in butter, N. No one, no one.

  • No one,

  • No one thinks.

  • No one thinks,

  • I'm the right fit.

  • No one thinks I'm the, I'm the, I'm the. Two words that are less stressed, lower in pitch.

  • I'm the,

  • So two unstressed words, and then the stressed word right, I'm the, I'm the, I'm the, I'm the right.

  • I'm the right,

  • fit.

  • And we do have a stop T there because the next word begins with a consonant fit.

  • Now let's look at our ending T here. It's a true T, she definitely releases it. Let's take a listen.

  • Fit.

  • It's very common to make an ending word like that with a stop T at the end of a thought group.

  • Fit, fit, instead of: fit fit, but she's really emphasizing it to say that someone's not the right fit.

  • Means they wouldn't work well at a job at an organization on a project

  • because of the other people or things in place.

  • So it's a way to tell someone no without criticizing them too much. They're just not the right fit.

  • Fit..

  • And so she's been hearing that a lot. She's feeling not very good about it.

  • And so she's stressing that word a little bit more by doing the True T pronunciation.

  • Right fit.

  • Right fit.

  • Oh my goodness who is--

  • Okay, so now, her pitch goes up really high. Oh my goodness.

  • She's very excited to have a moment with the dog.

  • Oh my goodness,

  • See if you can imitate that when you're working with the audio. Oh my goodness!

  • Oh my goodness!

  • Oh my goodness!

  • Oh my goodness!

  • Oh and good have the most stress there.

  • Oh my goodness!

  • Oh my goodness!

  • Oh my goodness!

  • Goodness. Something interesting is happening here she's dropping the D,

  • goodness, I've definitely heard that happen before,

  • so instead of goodness, it's goodness, goodness, goodness.

  • When you think about it, the tongue position for the D, ddd, with the tongue tip up, is really similar to the N, nnn.

  • Also with the tongue tip up, maybe that's why it's dropped.

  • At any rate, you can drop it too here when you're imitating this.

  • Oh my goodness!

  • Oh my goodness!

  • Oh my goodness!

  • Oh my goodness!

  • Also rather than the EH vowel in goodness, it's really more of an IH. Goodness. Goodness.

  • So she's playing with this word a little bit.

  • Oh my goodness!

  • Oh my goodness!

  • Oh my goodness who is this gentleman?

  • Who is this-- still that really high pitch.

  • Who is this gentleman?

  • Who is this gentleman?

  • Who is this gentleman?

  • Who is this gentleman?

  • Who is this gentleman?

  • Do you notice the T in gentlemen? Gentlemen. Ladies and gentlemen.

  • No T there. Again, T after N just like in interviewing, internet, gentleman, no T, T is dropped.

  • Gentleman?

  • Also notice in the word a man, the syllable man, it's not AA, it's a schwa. Gentleman, man, man, man, man.

  • Try not to even put a vowel in there. It's an unstressed syllable. It should not be man. Man, man, gentlemen.

  • Gentleman?

  • Oh, this is a foster.

  • This is a foster. Oh, this is a foster.

  • So again, her intonation is a little bit higher than normal. This is not a conversational intonation.

  • This is like: oh my goodness, what a cute dog intonation. Lifted.

  • This is a foster. You would never have an normal conversation with somebody at this pace,

  • at this pitch, but this pitch being higher shows a different emotional state. This is a foster.

  • This is a foster.

  • This is a foster.

  • This is a foster.

  • Everything links together. This is a, the ending S of this goes right into the IH vowel of is.,

  • the ending z of is goes right into the schwa, UH, which goes right into the F.

  • This is a foster.

  • This is a foster. And actually her pitch goes up in the end after that.

  • Foster. After that up-down shape.

  • And it does because she's gonna keep going. She could have made it go down, but by making it go up,

  • she's like wait, I have an idea, I want to say more.

  • This is a foster.

  • You know, if you like animals, I should refer you to my sister.

  • You know,

  • More stress on know, the word you, you're probably noticing it's not you, it's ya, a reduction,

  • you know, you know.

  • You know,

  • if you like animals, I should refer you to my sister.

  • What are our peaks of stress in this next phrase?

  • If you like animals, I should refer you to my sister.

  • If you like animals, I should refer you to my sister.

  • If you like animals, I should refer you to my sister.

  • If you like, if you like, The F

  • linking right into the JU diphthong. It almost sounds like we can hear the word few in there.

  • If you like animals. Stress on an--, now this is not a pure AA.

  • If you look it up the dictionary, it's written with the AA symbol

  • but when AA gets followed by N, it's not pure anymore.

  • Jaw doesn't drop quite as much, the back of the tongue relaxes, so we have a little bit of an UH vowel in between.

  • AAUH, animals, animals, animals.

  • Animals,

  • I should refer you to my sister.

  • I should refer you to my sister. A little bit of stress on I, refer, second syllable stress there.

  • I should refer you to my sister.

  • First syllable stress on sister. That has some of that up-down shape too.

  • The word should, not pronounced should, it's pronounced: should should.

  • Unstressed, reduced, it's the schwa,

  • and we can drop that D, I do hear it very faintly before the R. Should, should, should, should.

  • Should refer, should refer. Now, the word refer has a schwa in that first unstressed syllable, re-fer.

  • So don't make that REE. Refer, refer, but re re re refer, refer.

  • I should refer,

  • Refer you to my. Refer you dadada. Flap T schwa for the word to. Refer you to my sister.

  • Refer you to my sister.

  • She owns a company.

  • What's her stress here?

  • She owns a company.

  • She owns a company.

  • She and com-- our most stressed syllables there.

  • She owns, okay she ends in EE, owns begins with the OH diphthong.

  • When a word that ends in EE links in to a word that begins with a vowel or diphthong,

  • that can be hard for some people to link really smoothly, she owns. It might help if you think of a Y

  • being in front of the word owns, she owns.

  • She owns,

  • a company.

  • She owns a company. Endings Z of owns linking right into the schwa.

  • She owns a, which links right into the K sound of company.

  • Company. Now, this is a letter A, compa-- but that should be a schwa. Pany, Pany, Pany, Pany, Pany.

  • These two unstressed syllables should be really simple. Pany, Pany, Pany, Pany,

  • low in pitch, less fully pronounced. Compared to com, com, company, company, company.

  • She owns a company.

  • She owns a company.

  • They do house-sitting and pet sitting.

  • They do, a little pause there, tiny little break. They do, they do, they do, they do, they do.

  • Those both have a little bit of a stress feel to me.

  • They do, they do, they do house-sitting and pet sitting.

  • House sitting and pet sitting.

  • Little tiny break there. House sitting, house sitting and pet sitting.

  • Okay, so maybe you notice the T's, the double T's in sitting, those are flap T's. House sitting, pet sitting.

  • Dadadada. Sitting, sitting, sitting, sitting.