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  • Hi, I'm Ronnie.

  • Um, and - Oh, wow!

  • I got a balloon!

  • Woo-hoo!

  • Thank you!

  • Who gave me a balloon?

  • I got a balloon, I got a balloon, I'm so happy!

  • Balloons are the best, yeah?

  • You can hit people on the head with them and just have a really great time with a balloon.

  • But there's something that I need to talk to you guys about, something quite serious,

  • actually.

  • A lot of people ask me about very formal English.

  • Changing their formal vocabulary into less formal or informal or, even if you wanted

  • to, you could say slang, but it's not really slang.

  • Unfortunately, I've noticed that what we do with our English language is we completely

  • dumb it down.

  • If you dumb something down, it means you make it easier or dumber.

  • No.

  • And what happens is we take beautiful verbs that you might have in your language, or very

  • similar, and we just replace them with the verb "get" or "got".

  • So, people who are learning English find it really difficult, because native speakers

  • always say "got".

  • I got this.

  • Did you get it?

  • Oh, I got this.

  • But actually, "got" has many different meanings, and we're replacing our verbs with one verb.

  • So, this gets easier.

  • Maybe you can replace all of the verbs with "got"!

  • Nah, it's not going to work.

  • But I'm going to teach you really, really specific examples that I hear all the time.

  • In reverse, if you think that maybe your English is a little bit informal and you would like

  • to focus on learning more formal English, you can replace your wonderful use of the

  • word "got" or "get" to more exclusive verbs.

  • So, let's go.

  • Formal to informal, featuring the verb "get".

  • And first of all, we've got to look at the forms of the verb "get".

  • In the simple present, we have "get".

  • The past tense is "got", so I got a balloon.

  • The past participle, which we would use with present perfect or past perfect or in the

  • passive voice, we would say "gotten".

  • You can also just say "got".

  • Trick.

  • And we can also use with -ing if we use an adjective.

  • For example, I can say, "I'm getting a cold, achoo!"

  • Maybe tomorrow, getting a cold, but I got a balloon, yeah, I got a balloon!

  • Okay, calm down, Ronnie.

  • Concentrate.

  • So, you guys will say something like, "Oh, yesterday, I received an email."

  • And I'll be like "Ah, did you get my email?"

  • So, instead of the word "received", for an email or a letter, we would say "got".

  • Now, notice this is the past tense, so we'd say, "I got an email".

  • She bought a ticket.

  • Look at this pronunciation, be careful.

  • It looks like "bogeta", but it's actually just "bought".

  • You can remember it like "robot".

  • So, in informal English, we don't say "Oh, you know, I went online and I bought a ticket."

  • We would say, "Ah, I got a ticket."

  • This one is a very, very common one that, oh, freaks me out how often people use this.

  • If you say, "They arrived home at 7."

  • Oh, you mean you got home at 7?

  • Because that's how I would say it more naturally.

  • So, you can definitely say these verbs, received, bought, arrived.

  • But you have to understand that native speakers, we replace with the verb "got", because all

  • of these are past tense, okay?

  • So, be careful of your tenses.

  • This is an example of using the negative, okay?

  • So, I can say, "He didn't understand the joke."

  • But I would say, "Oh, you know what?

  • He didn't get my joke."

  • Remember, when you're using the negative in the past, your verb is going to be still the

  • simple present.

  • So, we're going to say "He didn't get the joke".

  • Maybe the joke wasn't funny.

  • Okay.

  • This is fun too.

  • "I developed a rash."

  • So, a rash is - hello, balloon.

  • A rash is when your skin, when it gets really itchy and red spots and you gotta scratch

  • it?

  • That's a rash.

  • You can also develop a tan.

  • Or like me, you can get a sunburn.

  • So, a tan is when the sun makes your skin darker.

  • Which most people like.

  • I'm a vampire though, right?

  • So, I don't get a tan.

  • So, very formally, we'd say, "I developed a tan.

  • I developed a rash from eating too many pistachios".

  • But normally, in very informal English, we'd say, "I got a rash from eating all the nuts."

  • This is an example of when we're using an adjective.

  • Now, this is a verb, a rash, a tan, the joke.

  • These guys are all nouns.

  • So, be careful with your grammar.

  • "I'm", you have to say the verb "to be".

  • "I'm becoming mad."

  • So, maybe you're trying to express your emotion.

  • When we talk about our emotion, our emotions in English are usually adjectives.

  • Hungry, sad, happy.

  • So, we wouldn't say, "You know what?

  • I'm becoming hungry."

  • We would say, "I'm getting hungry".

  • So, we're going to use the verb in the -ing, because we're using it with an adjective.

  • So, I'm getting hungry.

  • I'm getting tired.

  • I'm getting bored.

  • I'm going to play with my balloon.

  • I gotta go.

  • Did you get it?

Hi, I'm Ronnie.

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B1 中級

英語ネイティブのような「GET」の使い方 (How to use “GET” like a native English speaker)

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    Summer に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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