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  • [music]

  • >> Dave Fahey, Co-Project Scientist: The Global Hawk is the world's most sophisticated unmanned

  • aircraft. NASA's acquisition of these aircraft are the first by a civilian agency. And so

  • that gives us an opportunity to show how we might use these for Earth science. This capability

  • is our future.

  • >> Paul Newman, Co-Project Scientist: GloPac is the Global Hawk Pacific Mission. GloPac

  • is the first scientific mission that is being flown on the Global Hawk aircraft. Before

  • this aircraft was acquired by NASA, it was used for actually military reconnaissance.

  • The Global Hawk is a fully autonomous aircraft. It doesn’t have any operators onboard. The

  • Global Hawk can fly to 65,000 feet, it has a wingspan that’s just a little longer than

  • the wingspan of a 737. A long wingspan allows you to get to higher altitudes. It can fly

  • over 30 hours continuously, and has a range of over ten thousand nautical miles. The Global

  • Hawk can take off from California and get all the way up to the high Arctic, plus it

  • can go all the way to the equator. And so it’s a really capable plane in terms of

  • duration and altitude. Much more than any manned aircraft we've ever used.

  • >> Dave Fahey, Co-Project Scientist: The value of the GloPac mission really is two-fold.

  • One, it’s showing how an unmanned aircraft of the capabilities of the Global Hawk can

  • be used for the benefit of Earth Science. This aircraft significantly expands our capability.

  • And second, we will gather some very important information from the atmosphere during GloPac,

  • to tell us about the distribution of gases and aerosols in the upper troposphere and

  • lower stratosphere. The upper troposphere and lower stratosphere is a very important

  • region of the atmosphere to study. One of the reasons is it's not very often studied

  • because of the difficulty of getting there. Satellites routinely sample that region but

  • not as, with the same kind of precision that you might like. So we'd like to do more process-based

  • studies in that region.

  • >> Paul Newman, Co-Project Scientist: There's a total of ten instruments aboard the Global

  • Hawk for the GloPac mission. These instruments break into two kinds; one is what we call

  • a remote sensor, which measures things far away. We have another type of instrument we

  • call an in situ instrument, and this measures the air that the aircraft is actually flying

  • through. They will measure particular gases like ozone, water, nitrous oxide, or laughing

  • gas, plus temperatures, pressures, winds and so forth.

  • >> Dave Fahey, Co-Project Scientist: The other thing is were very interested in validation

  • of the Aura satellite.

  • >> Paul Newman, Co-Project Scientist: The Aura satellite measures ozone depleting gases

  • and ozone. The second thing it does, is that Aura measures various gases involved with

  • air quality. So it’s a validation experiment. You have to make sure that your satellite

  • instruments are still measuring what you originally intended for them to measure.

  • [music]

  • >> Chris Naftel, Global Hawk Project Manager: One of the great things about this aircraft

  • is it can be configured for a wide range of payloads. Payloads can be mounted underneath

  • the nose of the aircraft, under the belly of the aircraft, in the rear tail area. There's

  • several bays on the side of the aircraft that are available. On top, near the front of the

  • aircraft, under the radome.

  • >> Dave Fratello, Global Hawk Payload Manager: So on the airplane itself, we've identified

  • over 14 different compartments that are available for payloads. We've added six Iridium links

  • for global payload communication. There's also four on there for the aircraft command

  • and control. So we're actually carrying 10 Iridium systems on the airplane. Iridium is

  • an array of satellites. You can be anywhere on the Earth and you're within Iridium coverage

  • 24-7. And so it's a great way for us to talk to the airplane and get downlink data from

  • the aircraft no matter where it is in the world.

  • >> Paul Newman, Co-Project Scientist: With most aircraft, the people are either sitting

  • in the aircraft and so they're watching their measurements as the airplane is flying through

  • certain air, or they're on the ground, and you don't see your data until after the plane

  • has landed. With the Global Hawk, though, everybody's sitting in a room called the Global

  • Hawk Operations Center, and you're viewing your data as it's being measured. So you get

  • to see your data in real time.

  • >> Dave Fratello, Global Hawk Payload Manager: Well, the GHOC, our Global Hawk Operations

  • Center, it's uniquely divided into two rooms. We've got the flight operations group in the

  • front. In the back room we have a fully independent capability for our payload scientists. So

  • we've got 14 workstations there. Each one dedicated to supporting an individual instrument.

  • >> Paul Newman, Co-Project Scientist: And we have all the instrument operators sitting

  • in this back room, they can talk to their instruments and make subtle corrections to

  • the computer programming of the instrument, or they can send it in to a different sampling

  • mode. So it's really an interactive process now. So it's a new way of doing science.

  • >> Phil Hall, Global Hawk Pilot: When we were controlling the NASA Global Hawk, it?s a whole

  • different challenge. It's more like being a cross between an air traffic controller

  • and pilot because you have this birds-eye view of the aircraft. It's a very sort of

  • a disconnected experience. We have to really focus on where it is, how it's going to react.

  • When I give it commands how long is it going to take. It's a lot of the basic airmanship,

  • but the hand-eye coordination is a lot different. It's mouse-screen coordination

  • >> Delewis Porter, Global Hawk Pilot: If you're an airplane pilot, then to think the possibility

  • of leaving that and start flying an airplane that's remotely controlled and using a mouse

  • and a keyboard, that's a big paradigm shift. But, as I got more and more involved in it

  • and started to search it out and realizing the potential of the Global Hawk aircraft

  • and its impact on the science world, I became more and more enamored with it.

  • >> Paul Newman, Co-Project Scientist: The GloPac mission is really a partnership of

  • a number of federal agencies and private industries, and universities. NASA is the one who owns

  • and operates these planes. But that's a partnership with both NOAA, the National Oceanographic

  • and Atmospheric Administration, and Northrup Grumman, the people who have built these planes.

  • >> Dave Fahey, Co-Project Scientist: The GloPac mission is a great example of the collaboration

  • between NASA and NOAA. Both agencies share an interest in the future of unmanned aircraft

  • for their particular program. And those of us in the GloPac mission see ourselves as

  • early adopters. And it’s very clear already that a success of this aircraft will have

  • a lot of ramifications because people?’ imaginations will be engaged as to what else

  • we could do now that weve demonstrated for the first time that putting scientific

  • instruments onboard and taking it far away from home is a good idea and can be done in

  • a successful way.

  • >> Paul Newman, Co-Project Scientist: I really think that this is really a historic occasion

  • for us. It's because we're on the cusp of something new. We're on the cusp of using

  • a plane that's a basically a satellite as well as a plane. We can venture out into the

  • regions where a lot of the weather in the United States forms but is so remote from

  • us that we can't get to it. And so that information is now going to be used to improve forecasts,

  • it'll be used to improve our policies towards air quality and climate change and ozone depletion.

  • It's a new way of doing things for us. And I think that's what makes you think that we're

  • really doing something exciting and new and historic.

  • [music]

[music]

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NASAグローバルホークUAV大気観測ミッション - GloPac (NASA Global Hawk UAV Atmospheric Research Mission - GloPac)

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    羅致 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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