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  • Kathy! How are you? Fine. We wanted to speak to you about our business trip.

  • You know we're travelling to California next month? Yes.

  • Can we travel business class? Absoultely not! But it's a six hour flight.

  • It's such a long journey. Business class is far too expensive. I think that was a 'no'.

  • Here are three words my students often muddle up. They have similar meanings.

  • In this video we'll learn how to use them correctly and fix some common mistakes.

  • Wow! Look at that view. Isn't that beautiful? Yeah!

  • Let's go up to the top of that mountain, Jay. That's a long walk. I think we can travel

  • by cable car. Really? Yeah. Wow! The word 'travel' is usually a verb - an action

  • - and it means to go from one place to another. Riding a bike is a great way to travel around

  • the city. I can slip through all the traffic. You know we're travelling to California next

  • month? Yes. Can we travel business class? Absolutely not.

  • We spell the word 'traveling' with one 'L' in American English and two 'Ls' in British

  • English. And we call people who travel, travellers. In American English we spell that with one

  • 'L'. And in British English it has two 'L's I'm traveling to New York today and then on

  • to Boston. It's a business trip. 'Travel' is normally a verb, but not always.

  • Let's look at another example. Is 'travel' a verb here?

  • My job involves a lot of travel. I'm often away from home.

  • My job involves a lot of travel.

  • I'm often away from home. In this sentence, travel is a noun - a thing.

  • And here's where it get tricky. If 'travel' is a noun, we use it to talk about travel

  • in general. So we might talk about air travel, rail travel,

  • space travel or time travel. The rising price of jet fuel is pushing up

  • the price of air travel for business travelers. When 'travel' is a noun, it's normally uncountable.

  • That means we can't talk about 'a' travel. This is wrong.

  • We use it to talk about travel in general, so this question is wrong too.

  • If you're talking about a specific piece of travelling, you need to use other words instead,

  • like journey or trip. But it's a six hour flight. It's such a long

  • journey. Business class is far too expensive. We use 'journey' when places are a long way

  • apart, so there's a big distance or a lot of time involved.

  • We might talk about a journey across the Sahara, or a journey to outer space.

  • How long does it take you to commute to work, Jay? Two hours. Wow! That's a long journey!

  • Umm. I guess that's why you're always tired when

  • you get to work. Ummm. So a journey involves a long distance or a

  • lot of time. Trips are similar. I'm traveling to New York today and then on

  • to Boston. It's a business trip. We can take trips for business or trips for

  • pleasure. Tourists in Paris like to take boat trips for fun.

  • When you know someone is going to travel somewhere, you can say, 'Have a nice trip'.

  • Have a nice trip, Frank. Sure Kitty. See you when I get back. Bon voyage.

  • Now be careful with this word. If it's a verb, it means something different.

  • If you catch your foot on something and almost fall, you trip. Jay nearly tripped over there.

  • But when trip is a noun, it means a journey to a place and then back again.

  • So how was your trip? It was great. I think we got the contract. Oh well done!

  • And what about your journey? How was that? There were a lot of delays.

  • Trip and journey are both nouns here and they mean slightly different things.

  • Journey refers to the travelling, but trip is the travelling and everything that happens

  • on the way, so the whole visit as well as the journey.

  • So how was your trip? It was great. I think we got the contract. Oh well done!

  • And what about your journey? How was that? There were a lot of delays.

  • So let's review. There's travel. It's normally a verb. We travel from place to place and

  • sometimes it's a noun - an uncountable noun. When we're talking about a specific piece

  • of travelling, we use journey and trip. Journeys are often longer than trips. Also

  • journey is just the travelling and trip is the travelling and everything that happens

  • on the way. And that's it. Now you know how to use these

  • words. Oh hi Kathy! So how was California? Awful!

  • Fantastic! The journey was terrible. The airline lost

  • my luggage. I hate traveling. My journey was wonderful. I got upgraded to

  • first class for free. Oh that's nice. But what happened in your meetings?

  • Nothing! My trip was a waste of time. I didn't sell anything.

  • I got three new clients. Oh well done Vicki. What a successful trip!

  • Are you travelling anywhere soon? Have a safe journey and enjoy your trip.

Kathy! How are you? Fine. We wanted to speak to you about our business trip.

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A2 初級

旅行、旅行、旅。簡単な英語のビデオで英語を学ぶ - ESL (Travel, Trip and Journey: Learn English with Simple English videos - ESL)

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    Sophie に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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