Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • -Welcome to "The Tonight Show."

  • Seeing what is going on in our country,

  • I'm not going to have a normal show tonight.

  • I'm going to have a different kind of show.

  • I'm going to start this personally and then expand out

  • because that's where we all need to start --

  • with ourselves and looking at ourselves in the mirror.

  • And I had to really examine myself --

  • really examine myself in the mirror this week

  • because a story came out about me on "SNL"

  • doing an impression of Chris Rock in blackface.

  • And I was horrified.

  • Not of the fact that people

  • were trying to cancel me or cancel the show,

  • which is scary enough.

  • But the thing that haunts me the most was,

  • How do I say, "I love this person?

  • I respect this guy more than I respect most humans.

  • I'm not a racist. I don't feel this way."

  • And instead, what I kept getting advised was

  • to just stay quiet and to not say anything,

  • and that's the advice, because we're all afraid.

  • And I took it for a minute.

  • I took the advice, and thought,

  • "God, I'm going to do this wrong. You're right.

  • I'm going to say something

  • and get myself into even more trouble.

  • I'm going to make this worse. I don't know what to do."

  • So I thought about it,

  • and I realized that I can't not say I'm horrified

  • and I'm sorry and I'm embarrassed.

  • And what that small gesture did for me was break my own silence.

  • And what then I started to do was talk to some experts,

  • some of which are here tonight and this week,

  • and I realized that the silence is the biggest crime

  • that white guys like me and the rest of us are doing.

  • Staying silent.

  • We need to say something.

  • We need to keep saying something.

  • And we need to stop saying, "That's not okay,"

  • more than just one day on Twitter.

  • I realize I needed to get educated

  • about how to stop the silence

  • and the fear of saying the wrong thing

  • by not being silent and stepping out and stepping up.

  • But I need to be -- We all need to be talking about this.

  • And I spoke to someone incredible and brilliant

  • who I think can help us all out a little bit here

  • in this incredibly sensitive

  • and in-our-face subject that we need to deal with.

  • We cannot try to bury this again.

  • It's not going to get buried. It's not going away.

  • We can't just hope that everyone loves each other.

  • We can't say, "Be the change," and just sit around tweeting,

  • "Be the change, be the change."

  • What is the change? How do I change?

  • How do I do it? What do I do? Can I wear a T-shirt?

  • Is there a color? Is there a sign?

  • Is there a way to do this? I don't know.

  • So let's start talking with some people about this

  • and try to get proactive and activated

  • in this love, in this change cycle.

  • So let's figure out

  • how we're going to get along with each other.

  • Let's figure out how we're going to stop this senseless violence

  • that erupts and disrupts

  • the entire country and now the world.

  • The world is screaming, and it is angry,

  • and we all need to figure out a way to take the anger,

  • which, of course, is just sadness and fear,

  • and do something with it and try to actually dig this up.

  • This is such a long root in the ground.

  • It is so long and deep,

  • but we got to get in there, and we have to dig it up.

  • I don't know how else to do it. I'm clearly not an expert.

  • I'm clearly a late-night talk show host,

  • and I screwed it up already.

  • So let's go. Let's reform. Let's talk. Let's do it.

  • My first guest tonight is Derrick Johnson,

  • the president and CEO of the NAACP.

  • We're going to open the show with him tonight and just talk.

  • Here we go.

  • Derrick, thank you so much

  • for being a guest on our show tonight.

  • I know you must be very, very busy, so I appreciate this.

  • -Well, it's a pleasure to be here,

  • and I do want to respond to your opening monologue.

  • That was powerful,

  • but most importantly that's about courage.

  • In this time of many people searching for answers

  • and just the display of anger and hopelessness and wandering,

  • more people need to speak about

  • where they are with a really authentic voice.

  • And I think you did that with the opening monologue,

  • so thank you for those words.

  • -With all the things that are happening right now,

  • I mean, there's so much to talk about.

  • But I personally want to know how I can do better

  • and take responsibility for how I act

  • both consciously and unconsciously.

  • And so we talked about this -- I talked to you --

  • thank you very much --

  • about my mistakes I made in the past,

  • and I want to move forward, going forward.

  • I want to work on being a better ally.

  • -You know, we are all born flawed,

  • but flawed is part of the journey that we are on

  • so we can try to get to perfection.

  • And if anyone can stand up and say, "I haven't made a mistake,"

  • run, because that person is clearly a liar.

  • We have an opportunity to move forward.

  • We have an opportunity to open up dialogue.

  • We have an opportunity to learn to understand one another.

  • -How do we keep the momentum going?

  • -You know, one of the worst things

  • about these moments of realization

  • is people want to have

  • a quick-fix outpour and then go back to their corners.

  • The way we keep the momentum going

  • is keeping the dialogue open,

  • appreciating the uniqueness we all bring to the table,

  • and celebrating that uniqueness

  • and not allowing demagogues to create otherness

  • from people who may be different.

  • -I know that I'm getting a lot of advice from you,

  • but, also, I think it's important to know

  • that white people should be talking to white people

  • about racism, as well. -Yeah.

  • -Can you talk about that a little?

  • -So, racism is a learned behavior.

  • And for us to unlearn behavior, we have to be honest about it

  • and create spaces where we can talk about it.

  • And I appreciate you.

  • But most importantly be the example we want to see.

  • And so peer-to-peer conversations,

  • using one's platform to promote a more positive outlook at life

  • as it relates to other people's uniqueness and difference

  • becomes important.

  • You know, you and I, we've talked about

  • building out a campaign looking forward.

  • And once we launch it, I hope others will join in.

  • The beautiful thing about where we are today --

  • media is so democratized that anyone of us can be

  • our own news channel, our own information source.

  • And for celebrity types with huge following

  • on their social-media platforms,

  • it's really important that we start amplifying

  • lines of communication

  • that opens up the issue of being anti-racist,

  • to talk about the uniqueness of who we are as Americans,

  • and to really promote a more positive dialogue

  • with one another to do better

  • and then not allow demagogues sitting in particular seats

  • to drive a wedge between communities.

  • -I've heard that term "anti-racist" now.

  • It's, like, kind of a buzzword now on Twitter.

  • What does it actually --

  • What does it mean? Anti-racist?

  • -It means that you're actually fighting against racism,

  • that you are consciously doing things

  • to stop the spread of racism.

  • We also understand that racism is structural,

  • it's institutionalized,

  • and that as much as you benefit

  • from that structure and that institution,

  • you fight to remove that structure

  • and those institutions

  • so others can have a level playing field.

  • We have not had a level playing field in this country

  • since its inception, and we need to create a way

  • that we can all be celebrated

  • and all the excellence that we bring to the table

  • can be appreciated by the communities across the country.

  • Think about where we would have been without a Motown,

  • with all that creativity.

  • Can you imagine what it would feel like

  • if you never heard the voice of Aretha Franklin?

  • Think about that fact that you have the comedic genius

  • of Eddie Murphy or Chris Rock, one of your friends.

  • That's what this is about.

  • How do you remove those barriers

  • so we can have more Aretha Franklins,

  • we can have more Eddie Murphys,

  • we can all get down with Beyoncé and Jay-Z?

  • That's what we're talking about,

  • because there's so much we are losing

  • as a result of the structural barriers

  • and institutional racism that currently exists.

  • -This moment happening now,

  • would you compare it to any other moment in our history?

  • -You know, it's fascinating.

  • I just spoke earlier about the last 70 days

  • is perhaps the worst in our history in my opinion

  • since the Civil War.

  • We opened up the last 70 days with a global pandemic

  • and an anemic response from the federal government

  • causing mass spread of a virus gone unaddressed too long.

  • Then we realize, for the African-Americans,

  • that we were being disproportionately impacted,

  • we didn't have enough tests,

  • only to fall into our normal state of aggressive policing

  • in our communities, first in Georgia.

  • Then to learn that someone was killed in her bed

  • in Louisville, Kentucky,

  • followed by the incident in Minneapolis,

  • followed by the woman in Central Park.

  • Only for people to stand up to have peaceful protests

  • because the district attorney

  • refused to bring those officers to justice,

  • moving that along to violence in the street

  • all under the backdrop of economic collapse.

  • We have had a rough 70 days,

  • and we must stand up against what's taking place.

  • -And we can take this, hopefully, this moment

  • and turn it into something positive.

  • -We can. I mean, it starts today.

  • It starts with us having this dialogue.

  • It starts with us understanding

  • that we need to drive people to do something.

  • For us, you know, you go on our website, NAACP.org,

  • and join us as volunteers, join the organization

  • because we have to address the structural racism,

  • the systemic issues that's plagued this country

  • for far too long, and we must do it together.

  • It's not just the burden of African-Americans.

  • It's the burden of all Americans and whites to join in.

  • This is an opportunity for us to do better so we can be better.

  • -We should have everyone watching --

  • I'd love them to go to NAACP.org and do what you can,

  • register in there and donate and help.

  • -Navigate the website. We're going to talk about --

  • If you want to just donate and stuff, great.

  • If you want to join, we want you to join.

  • NAACP, we are all races.

  • Our founding was both black, white, male, female.

  • We don't discriminate. We have LGBT.

  • We don't discriminate because we believe everyone

  • should be afforded equal protection

  • under the law, so therefore we operate that way.

  • If you want to get engaged and be a volunteer,

  • it's all there -- NAACP.org.

  • We need your support

  • so we can make democracy work for everyone.

  • -I want to work with you, Derrick, and the NAACP,

  • so if you don't mind, I'd like to check in with you

  • every couple of months just to see how I'm doing

  • and what else I could be doing to help.

  • Is that okay? -I'm looking forward to it.

  • And, Jimmy, historical note.