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  • he's review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English I'm Den and joining me today is Katherine.

  • Hi, Catherine.

  • So what's the story today?

  • Story down is about a delegation on the environment delegation and the environment Okay lets him or from this BBC World Service bulletin.

  • Environment ministers from about 100 countries are meeting in the Canyon capital Nairobi to try to finalize a declaration to combat pollution.

  • Challenges include banning the use of toxic lead in paint on limiting the amount of plastic that finds its way into the ocean.

  • So ministers from around the world have gone to Nairobi in Kenya and the reason they're there is to try to finalize an official document which has a purpose of trying to stop pollution.

  • The issues in particular that they're talking about include things like toxic paint on plastic in the world's oceans.

  • Wow, it sounds kind of serious.

  • Okay, so you've been looking around the news and the stories for three words and expressions we can use to talk about it.

  • Yeah, What have you found?

  • Yes, I've been looking around, and we have three quite serious words.

  • Actually, we have Armageddon packed on rampant Armageddon, packed and rampant.

  • Okay, can we have the first headline, then, please?

  • Yes.

  • So let's go to CBS News.

  • The headline is U N Environment chief warns we are facing an ocean Armageddon.

  • Armageddon, a highly destructive event, sounds very serious.

  • It does.

  • It is very serious, and it tells, in fact, the capital A which indicates seriousness.

  • And it's a kind of proper known that we call it.

  • It comes originally from Hebrew on its original meaning is in a religious context.

  • Some people believe that there will be a final big war between good and evil, and this war will signal or will cause the end of the world as we know it.

  • So it's caught.

  • So the word Armageddon often also is referred to as of the Apocalypse West.

  • We're not talking religiously necessarily here.

  • The idea is that this will.

  • This is a really, really big, potentially damaging problem.

  • It could cause the end of the world.

  • It certainly could, cause it will potentially Yes, Actually, the scientists are looking at it that way they're using it to say this if we don't clean up the world, that could actually end.

  • So in Armageddon describes really, really serious problem.

  • Okay, it's quite a newsy word.

  • Very dramatic.

  • Nice and long draws the eye.

  • Yes.

  • Can I use it on a kind of an every day basis with you could use it to describe really life changing events.

  • Divorce, death, horrible accidents You would and use it to describe spilling a cup of coffee.

  • OK, that would be possibly a crisis or a catastrophe, especially if I spilled it all over the script.

  • Yes, would be.

  • But would you say Armageddon probably know?

  • Probably No.

  • Okay, So before we cause Armageddon by not moving onto the next word, can we have our second headline, please?

  • We can.

  • So going to The Times of India, The headline is U N Environmental entities sign pact for climate action packed formal agreement.

  • Yes, and this one comes from originally from French.

  • It's a noun on.

  • We use it in often an official to describe official agreements, maybe between countries, maybe between political parties, maybe between big businesses packed can also be referred to synonyms are a treaty or an alliance, and it means an agreement.

  • T do something or an agreement not to do something.

  • Do you have any examples?

  • You can have something like a nonaggression pact.

  • You can have a political pact.

  • You can have a trade partner, so we often use it with a second word.

  • T form a compound.

  • Okay, and if I'm not mistaken, you make a pact.

  • You make a pact with somebody, or you make a pact to do something the opposite.

  • If you have a pact and then you don't keep to it, you can talk about breaking a packed yes, and you shouldn't break your packed down.

  • It's very bad, See, and is it always used in a diplomatic or official context?

  • No, not necessarily.

  • You can use it in a personal level with you could make a pact with a friend.

  • You can make a pact with a colleague.

  • Often it's an agreement to do something, maybe regularly or in the future.

  • PacTel often long term things that reminds me of my friend Paul and his wife, Rosie.

  • There's hacked for a no treats November notice.

  • November no chocolate, no sugar.

  • In November, that sounds like a long month must be very long for them.

  • A walrus.

  • Right?

  • So our viewers know perfectly well that in this program we do three words.

  • That is a pack we have with them.

  • So let's not break it on.

  • We should move on to our third headline.

  • We should So news 24 U.

  • N.

  • Makes global bid to end rampant pollution rampant, increasingly out of control.

  • Yes, And this is another word which comes originally from French and it actually has quite ah meaning and imagery.

  • So if you think of flags or often what we call coats of arms from the field off heraldry think of a flag which has animals on it like a lion unicorn, sometimes horses on flags on statues on if the animal is standing on its to back legs with its front legs in the air.

  • We call this position rampant on what it means Is that animals ready for action, ready to charge, all ready to fight?

  • Um, we use this would rampant in everyday English to describe something that is wild out of control, moving very quickly something that you can't control.

  • OK is rampant we're talking about.

  • We're talking about negative things here usually, right?

  • Most definitely.

  • Yes, he's.

  • Yep.

  • While I mean, I saw a story this morning about Wildfire in California.

  • Yes.

  • Is it rampant?

  • Absolutely.

  • If it's going, if it's destroying everything and nobody can stop it, it's rampant.

  • We talk about crime being rampant.

  • Particular types of crime can be rampant.

  • Eso Yes, something that's negative, part destructive on, especially out of control and spreading more and more quickly.

  • Do we always use it to describe very dangerous things such as crime?

  • Can we use it on kind of an every day?

  • Yeah.

  • It doesn't have to be a sort of world destruction level.

  • It can be on a personal level.

  • If you've got, like a problem with insects in your house.

  • Maybe you've got ants in your fridge in.

  • You can't get rid of them.

  • They're rampant or in my God.

  • And when I moved into where I live now, nobody had looked after the garden and the weeds were everywhere.

  • They were rampant, took a lot of work to get rid of them.

  • Fantastic.

  • I mean, not the weeds.

  • That was fantastic view.

  • But thank you for the explanation.

  • That was fantastic.

  • Let's have a look at our Facebook challenge.

  • I trust that our viewers have been going rampant, giving their answers.

  • So we said an environmental meeting in Kenya has met to discuss global pollution, including toxic paint and limiting ocean plastic.

  • Which of these is not a synonym for limit?

  • Is it a hinder?

  • Be inhibit C restrict or D slack in?

  • How do they do?

  • Very well.

  • We have a lot of answers.

  • Almost almost everybody got it right.

  • The correct answer was D Slackened does not have quite the same meaning of the other three.

  • So well done to Jenny Huang Bernard Bobble on in her Kim who all got that one correct Well done to everybody who got it correct.

  • And now, Catherine, if you wouldn't mind, could you please recap the vocabulary?

  • I can.

  • So we had Armageddon.

  • Ah, highly destructive event packed Is a formal agreement rampant, increasingly out of control?

  • Thank you.

  • If you'd like to test yourself on today's road category, there is a quiz that you can take on our website BBC Learning english dot com, where you'll also find lots of other fantastic materials and videos to help you improve your English.

  • Thank you very much for joining us and good bye, Good bye.

he's review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English I'm Den and joining me today is Katherine.

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地球汚染:解決策を求めてBBCニュースレビュー (Global pollution: seeking solutions: BBC News Review)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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