Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Everyone has something that motivates them.

  • For some people it's money.

  • For some, it may be recognition,

  • and others, maybe chocolate.

  • If you're one of my research animals,

  • it's the beloved Froot Loop.

  • They absolutely love these as treats.

  • They're easy for them to put in their mouth,

  • and most importantly,

  • they're packed with sugar.

  • In our lab, we study the brain chemical dopamine.

  • Dopamine is involved in movement,

  • most notably implicated in Parkinson's disease,

  • motivation and reward.

  • We study dopamine

  • in relation to learning and memory tasks.

  • Our rats learn to run in a maze,

  • and if they complete the task correctly,

  • they receive a food reward at the end.

  • We study and record when dopamine is released

  • as the rats are completing this task.

  • Look, he is even smiling! (Laughter)

  • Dopamine helps activate the learning centers in the brain.

  • So if dopamine is released

  • as you're learning something,

  • it will help you remember that information at a later date.

  • For example,

  • I had a chemistry professor on the very first day of class,

  • do an intense reaction with lots of flames and smoke.

  • He then explained

  • how and why this chemical reaction took place.

  • This reaction was done

  • just using regular tap water and sodium.

  • After he explained how this reaction worked,

  • I'll never forget exactly

  • how those electrons are moved in that reaction.

  • It is likely that as this reaction was taking place,

  • dopamine was being released in my brain.

  • Of course, since I don't have any of our lab's electrodes

  • placed in my brain, we won't know for sure.

  • On the left is a picture of the electrodes we build in our lab.

  • The electrode end consists of a single strand of carbon fiber.

  • It's about one-tenth the diameter of the strand of human hair.

  • We then implant these electrodes

  • in freely moving animals,

  • and record when dopamine is released,

  • as they complete maze tasks.

  • As you can see,

  • the rat brain is very small.

  • It's about the size of a nickel.

  • And the area of the brain that we're trying to reach,

  • is about the size of a pea.

  • We implant these electrodes in an area of the brain,

  • that's known to have a high number of dopamine neurons.

  • One of my main hobbies is photography.

  • So, for the background of my talk,

  • I thought I would take you all on a tour of my lab,

  • by way of my photography.

  • These are just a few of the things we use in our lab

  • to help us record dopamine.

  • So what can we do to increase dopamine in our brain?

  • Exercise, is a great way to increase dopamine.

  • Exercise will increase dopamine release in your brain,

  • as well as other neurochemicals,

  • such as endorphins

  • which are the brain's natural painkillers.

  • Eating properly,

  • is another great way to increase dopamine.

  • Specifically, eating foods rich in tyrosine,

  • which is a precursor to dopamine,

  • will help, increase the available dopamine in the brain.

  • Foods rich in tyrosine

  • include things such as: Avocados,

  • almonds and bananas.

  • Another great way to release dopamine,

  • is doing something rewarding to you.

  • This can be something

  • as easy as checking something off your to-do list,

  • or perhaps volunteering at a community center.

  • And of course,

  • one of my personal favorite ways, to increase dopamine,

  • is sex. (Laughter)

  • Sex releases many beneficial chemicals in the brain

  • in addition to dopamine,

  • such as oxytocin,

  • which is implicated in human bonding.

  • Serotonin,

  • which relates to happiness and a feeling of well-being.

  • And norepinephrine,

  • which increases alertness.

  • So how can we use this information?

  • Professors can develop new and exciting ways,

  • to deliver information to students.

  • It doesn't have to be as exciting

  • as involving flames and explosions like my chemistry professor.

  • It can be as simple as

  • having students do a hands-on experience,

  • or perhaps using the students as props

  • to explain a difficult concept.

  • Professors, get away from the traditional monologue lectures.

  • It'll be more rewarding for you,

  • and will stimulate the students to promote long-term learning.

  • Let's get those dopamine neurons firing.

  • Thank you. (Applause)

Everyone has something that motivates them.

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級

TEDx】学習と記憶に及ぼすドーパミンの効果。TEDxCCSでのエリック・マー (【TEDx】Dopamine's effects on learning and memory: Eric Marr at TEDxCCS)

  • 198 17
    Precious Annie Liao に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語