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  • (upbeat music)

  • - Hello everyone and welcome back to English with Lucy.

  • Today I've got a very special guest.

  • This is.

  • - Harry.

  • - From the channel.

  • - Real English with Real Teachers.

  • Hi guys.

  • - Hello. - Lovely to be here.

  • - So, we are lacking a member of the gang, aren't we?

  • We're lacking Charlie

  • who also works with Harry

  • on the Real English with Real Teachers channel.

  • What's wrong with Charlie?

  • - Charlie had a skiing accident,

  • so he can't join us today.

  • He is bedridden.

  • - Bedridden, yes, he can't get out of bed.

  • He's recovering in bed.

  • And I saw a picture of his x-ray.

  • Broken shoulder.

  • - Yeah. - Not nice.

  • - You can see it.

  • It's coming out like this.

  • - Urg.

  • - Yeah, it's rank.

  • - It's not for the fainthearted.

  • - No, not for the fainthearted.

  • Nice expression.

  • - Thank you.

  • Okay, so you guys might have seen my video

  • about five tips to help you improve

  • your conversation in English.

  • If you haven't seen it already,

  • you can have a look up here

  • and in that video, I asked you guys

  • if you wanted to see something about interjections.

  • But really, to show interjections,

  • you need a partner, someone else as well.

  • So, I thought I've got Harry here,

  • let's do it together.

  • - What is an interjection?

  • - Well, an interjection is a word or phrase

  • that a speaker can use to show feeling

  • or emotion, so it's normally.

  • - Ah, right.

  • - Yeah, it's normally used in spoken English,

  • it can be used in written English as well,

  • like in stories if the author wants to show

  • how a character is feeling.

  • - Quite useful.

  • We use that a lot in British English, don't we?

  • - We use it a lot, we really do.

  • And the thing is, if you want to improve your conversation,

  • you really need to know how to use interjections

  • and also understand them.

  • - Absolutely, absolutely.

  • - Yeah, 'cause they're different in different languages.

  • So, today I've picked out my top ten interjections

  • that native English speakers use

  • and I want to help you understand them

  • and hopefully, be able to use them.

  • So, let's get started.

  • - Let's do it. - Yeah.

  • Okay, so the first interjection

  • that we're going to talk about is hmmm.

  • - Hmmm. - Hmmm.

  • Now, what does hmmm, when would you use hmmm?

  • - Hmmm, perhaps when you are going to think about something.

  • - Yes, you would use hmmm to show

  • that you are thinking about something.

  • So, it could be great if you get asked a question

  • and you want to buy a bit of extra time

  • to think of an answer.

  • - Hmmm. - Okay.

  • And it's something that I mentioned in my previous video

  • because a lot of speakers will say, ehhh, ehhh.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Like that but we tend to say hmmm,

  • with our mouth shut.

  • And this is simply because having your mouth open

  • in front of someone else is considered impolite in English.

  • - Yeah, yeah, close the mouth.

  • Yeah, especially for students who are doing

  • like the IELTS and the Cambridge speaking exams.

  • - Yes.

  • - To get that, yeah, like Lucy said,

  • buying that extra time to think,

  • say a British sound, not ehhh, ehhh, ehhh,

  • say hmmm, that's an interesting question, hmmm.

  • - Hmmm, yeah, yeah and you just sound more native overall

  • by not saying ehhh and you say hmmm.

  • - Yeah. - It's very, very polite.

  • - It's very polite, yeah, yeah.

  • - Okay, the next one is jeez.

  • - [Both] Jeez.

  • - Okay. - Okay.

  • And jeez, I mean, where do you think

  • the word jeez comes from?

  • - Hmmm, probably our friend Jesus.

  • - It comes from the word Jesus

  • and it normally is used to expression shock

  • or exasperation.

  • - Yeah., agreed.

  • - So, I can say it in two different ways.

  • If I was to say, jeez, what would I be showing?

  • - Probably annoyance.

  • Probably that someone did something

  • you didn't like.

  • - Yeah.

  • - The third interjection that we have chosen for you

  • is phew.

  • - Phew.

  • Can often be teamed with the hand on the forehead.

  • - Yeah. - Phew.

  • - Phew.

  • - We would use the phew interjection to show relief

  • that you are relieved about something.

  • So, maybe I'm running for the bus

  • and then I see that it hasn't arrived

  • or maybe it's delayed, I would say, "Ah, phew."

  • Thank God.

  • - Yeah, you know, yeah, so you're very relieved about it.

  • I said it today actually.

  • - Did you? - Yeah, yeah.

  • - What happened?

  • - So, Lucy and I had real problems with the trains today

  • and I thought I was going to miss it

  • and I was going to be late for the lovely Lucy

  • and then I manged to catch the train

  • and I said.

  • - Phew. - Phew, phew.

  • - But the funny thing was I was on a similar train

  • and I was also delayed.

  • So, actually we were both delayed,

  • so there was no issue anyway.

  • - No, no.

  • - It was fine.

  • So, interjection number four

  • is oops.

  • Oops.

  • - Oops.

  • - This one, I think, is quite international.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Spanish people tend to spell it ups, like.

  • - [Both] Ups.

  • - Oops. - Oops.

  • - And when would we use oops?

  • - When you do something clumsy.

  • When you do something by accident,

  • something you didn't want to do.

  • - Something not too serious.

  • - Yeah, like.

  • - Oops. - Oops.

  • - We can sometimes say oops-a-daisy

  • and that's quite a common British, I would say,

  • if not English,

  • probably quite a British English expression.

  • Oops-a-daisy.

  • - Yeah, I can't imagine

  • an American person going

  • oops-a-daisy.

  • - Oops-a-daisy, yeah.

  • Do you know what?

  • We will probably find someone in the comments

  • that says no, I'm American and I use it all the time.

  • So, yeah.

  • - So tell us

  • if you are American and you use that expression.

  • Number five is ahem.

  • - Ahem. - Ahem.

  • - Ahem.

  • - What does that mean?

  • - Well, it's to show that you're clearing your throat

  • ready to say something, okay?

  • Maybe you have to interrupt someone.

  • So, you say ahem,

  • I'm going to say something,

  • let me interrupt you.

  • - Okay, so if I was talking your.

  • - Ahem.

  • I want to talk now.

  • (both laugh)

  • - Nicely done.

  • - People will often say ahem

  • before they make a speech.

  • (Lucy dings)

  • - They'll ding on a glass

  • and then go ahem.

  • I'm going to make a speech.

  • Number six is mmm, mmm

  • and this has many meanings.

  • We were just discussing that we use it a lot

  • to show agreement, that we agree with someone.

  • - Mmm.

  • - So, yeah, I'll be talking

  • and Harry will be mmm, agreeing along with me.

  • - Mmm, it's because you're very agreeable, mmm.

  • - Oh, thank you, Harry.

  • We would also use it if we see something delicious,

  • we might say.

  • - [Both] Mmm.

  • - Yeah, with a different intonation, a bit longer.

  • - Mmm.

  • Yeah, it's got a wave to it.

  • - Mmm. - Yeah.

  • - Would you say it if you saw someone

  • and you thought they were attractive?

  • - Mmm, yeah I would.

  • (Lucy and Harry laugh)

  • There are lots of different ways.

  • I think it depends really

  • on the body language with that one.

  • - Yeah, absolutely, agreed.

  • - But if you want to show that you're agreeing with someone,

  • without interrupting them and saying yes, yes,

  • right, all the time,

  • then just going mmm, mmm,

  • can show that you agree.

  • - Yeah, you could use that in a meeting,

  • in like a business meeting, mmm.

  • - So, for the next one,

  • how would you show that you disagree?

  • - Mmm. - Mmm/mm-mm.

  • - Ah, mmm/mm-mm. - So.

  • - Ah, I would go mmm.

  • With my students, if they're saying something wrong.

  • - Mhm.

  • - Or if they.

  • (Harry laughs)

  • Or if I think, yeah, they've made a grammar mistake

  • and I want them to realise,

  • I say mmm.

  • - Mmm, okay, so we're showing a doubt,

  • we're showing that we don't agree with someone

  • if we go mmm, in like a sort of questioning tone.

  • - Yes, or the one you said.

  • - The one I said which is mmm/mm-mm.

  • - The next interjection today is yikes.

  • - Yikes. - Yikes.

  • - Yeah.

  • - When would we say that?

  • - We would say yikes to show negative shock

  • at something, normally negative.

  • - Ah, okay.

  • - So, when I saw Charlie's broken bone,

  • yikes, that looks painful, yeah.

  • Yeah, so yikes.

  • - That is a good example to say yikes.

  • Yeah, yeah, something you think,

  • that's a bit disgusting, yikes.

  • - Yikes, yikes.

  • Now, the next one that we're going to talk about

  • is really, really British

  • and it's something I say all the time,

  • so much so that I actually have to cut it out

  • of my videos quite a lot.

  • And it is so.