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  • Throughout the history of television and film,

  • countless adaptations of Louisa May Alcott's Little Women

  • have retold the tale for each generation.

  • This coming-of-age classic about four sisters in Civil War-era Massachusetts

  • has resonated with readers since 1868.

  • Over the years, Little Women has been transformed in various ways,

  • with each subsequent adaptation altering different aspects of how the story is told.

  • Let's take a look at five screen adaptations of Little Women.

  • This is Little Women, by the book.

  • "$25? Where did you get this?"

  • "My dear!" "Oh, it's mine, honestly."

  • "I only sold what belonged to me."

  • "Your hair!"

  • Enormously popular with critics and audiences alike,

  • the first sound film adaptation of Little Women was released in 1933.

  • At the height of the Great Depression, audiences yearned for an escape to simpler times

  • but also gravitated toward the film's portrayal of frugality and resilience of spirit.

  • The movie opens with Mrs. March providing aid to the less fortunate,

  • not unlike Alcott herself, who served as a volunteer nurse for the Union Army.

  • This adaptation, however, avoids some of the harsher elements of the novel

  • leaving out incidents like Amy burning Jo's manuscript or falling through ice.

  • In fact, there is minimal friction shown between Jo and Amy,

  • and no mention of Jo's struggle with her temper.

  • Katharine Hepburn's theatrical, larger-than-life portrayal of Jo

  • dominated the film and informed later characterizations of the role.

  • Her exaggerated boyish manner, however, results in a marked contrast

  • when she becomes wistful and soft-spoken after meeting Professor Bhaer.

  • And unlike his description in the novel, the professor is a hesitant, quiet man

  • who sounds vaguely Italian rather than German.

  • "I have no courage to think that,

  • but could I dare hope, I know I shouldn't make so free as to ask..."

  • Because the majority of the film follows Jo's point of view,

  • the other sisters oftentimes are relegated to the background.

  • The progression of Jo and Laurie's relationship is accelerated,

  • while Laurie and Amy's romance takes place entirely off-screen.

  • Meg's character arc is limited to her courtship and marriage to John.

  • "My John wouldn't marry for money any more than I would.

  • I'm not afraid of being poor, and I know we shall be happy because John loves me and-

  • I love him!"

  • Although the film starts out establishing the theme of woman's capability and independence,

  • it largely focuses on their home and family lives.

  • By the 1930s, the right of women to earn a wage was being challenged

  • due to the economic depression.

  • This adaptation, like many other movies of the time,

  • promoted the idea of women in the home,

  • with marriage and motherhood as requisites for a happy ending.

  • "Where did you get it?"

  • "I didn't beg, borrow, or steal it.

  • I only sold what belonged to me."

  • "Jo!"

  • "Your hair."

  • In 1949, MGM sought to capitalize on Little Women's continuing popularity

  • by remaking the RKO film in Technicolor.

  • Alterations to the screenplay further advocated domesticity and

  • consumerism in the aftermath of WWII.

  • Audiences no longer wanted to be reminded of war or deprivation

  • so the film caters to a nostalgia for a bygone era

  • with rosy scenes of home and family life.

  • With their opulent costumes, the actresses at times look more like fashion plates

  • than girls experiencing genteel poverty.

  • Scenes were added to make Meg appear even more affluent after marriage.

  • Another deviation it takes from the novel

  • is to change the birth order of the sisters so that Beth is the youngest.

  • The majority of the scenes are patterned nearly word-for-word after the 1933 film.

  • This included using the exact same lines, character actions, and musical score.

  • At the end, Professor Bhaer brings Jo her published novel, now entitled My Beth.

  • Originally, Jo achieves considerable literary success on her own,

  • but here, as in the 1933 film, she loses her independence as a writer.

  • "My friend published it, he has big hopes, he thinks--"

  • "Oh, never mind what he thinks, did you like it?"

  • Like many Hollywood period films at the time,

  • the filmmakers emphasized the romance while staying in line with the Motion Picture Production Code.

  • A visually stunning film, this adaptation captures something of the spirit of Little Women

  • while presenting a highly romanticized view of the 1860s.

  • "25! Can Aunt March spare this?"

  • "I couldn't bear to ask her.

  • I sold my hair."

  • "Jo, how could you? Your one beauty."

  • Considered by many to be the definitive adaptation of Little Women,

  • the 1994 film conveys a sense of warmth and familiarity through an authentic depiction of the story.

  • Although Jo is still very much the main character,

  • the film further explores Meg, Beth, and Amy's storylines.

  • Major plot events that were missing from the previous films are finally depicted on-screen.

  • "Amy!"

  • In this version, the role of Amy was shared by two actresses

  • in order to realistically portray her as a 12-year-old and later a young woman.

  • We see Amy and Laurie's romance play out on-screen,

  • albeit in a condensed, dramatic manner.

  • Professor Bhaer and Jo's friendship also receives more screen time and development.

  • However, the film continues to depict the professor

  • as being instrumental in Jo's career and the realization of her potential.

  • In addition to featuring slightly modernized language,

  • the script reflects feminist and transcendentalist undertones.

  • Comments about philosophy and women's rights were used to reference Alcott's progressive views.

  • "Laurie is a man, and as such,

  • he may vote and hold property and pursue any profession he pleases.

  • So he is not so easily demeaned."

  • But what makes the 1994 adaptation truly memorable is its ability

  • to illuminate the emotions, conflicts, and growth of the characters in Little Women.

  • "What is this?"

  • In 2017, the BBC broadcasted a three-part miniseries

  • that offered a more serious look at Little Women.

  • Geared toward a younger audience, this version contains

  • occasional anachronistic expressions within the nineteenth-century dialogue.

  • More time is dedicated toward developing each member of the March family individually.

  • Mr. March gets a considerably larger role with scenes

  • that mirror Alcott's own relationship with her father.

  • Although Bronson Alcott encouraged his daughter's literary abilities,

  • he often became so emotionally invested in his own ideologies

  • that he was habitually out of work.

  • "I've been working on my book for 20 years,

  • and yes, it's starting to bear fruit."

  • "That is a wonderful accomplishment, Father,

  • and a luxury I'm not convinced I have."

  • Marmee is less of an idealized mother figure,

  • but a real person with her personal struggles.

  • This is the first adaptation to include Marmee's confession about her quick temper.

  • Amy is played by the same actress throughout the series,

  • which makes her appear older from the beginning.

  • Her childish actions come across as manipulative rather than immature.

  • Brief moments from the novel were included,

  • however, important dialogue and exposition were often left to the viewer's imagination.

  • In the novel, Amy and Laurie's engagement is described as

  • "having come about so naturally that no one could complain,"

  • but as is often the case, the screenwriters seem to rush through this storyline.

  • Instead, the adaptation focuses on playing down

  • the chemistry between Jo and Laurie

  • while amplifying Jo's connection with Professor Bhaer.

  • All in all, the series includes most of the iconic scenes from the classic

  • and adds in several new ones to help condense the story.

  • The adaptation feels fast-paced,

  • breezing through some plot points and lingering on others.

  • The mature, melancholy tone of the production is juxtaposed

  • with hopeful and radiant scenes for a contemporary take on Little Women.

  • "$25 dollars?

  • "It's not like Aunt March to be so generous." "I didn't go to Aunt March, I couldn't bear to."

  • "Where'd you get the money?"

  • "Well, I only sold what was my own."

  • "Jo, your hair!

  • "Your one beauty."

  • Released in 2019, this film adaptation retells the story in non-chronological order,

  • connecting moments from the past and present.

  • Because the actors look fairly similar in both timelines,

  • it can be confusing for viewers who are familiar with the plot.

  • Beyond hinting at the story's autobiographical nature, the screenplay takes it a step further.

  • For instance, the script includes lines from Alcott's journal

  • and takes inspiration from real life.

  • "I'd rather be a free spinster and paddle my own canoe."

  • Although Alcott did not want to marry Jo off,

  • she was pressured to do so to meet reader expectations.

  • So too, the ending here is ambiguous.

  • Other details about Louisa May Alcott's family were also written into the film,

  • though not mentioned in the novel.

  • The screenplay infuses the story with updated dialogue and a contemporary energy.

  • The way that the characters look, move, and comport themselves is distinctly modern.

  • Jo and Amy both give forceful monologues

  • that comment on the role of women in society.

  • "Well, I'm not a poet, I'm just a woman.

  • And as a woman, there's no way for me to make my own money."

  • This adaptation especially showcases a new perspective

  • on Amy's motivations and character.

  • The scene of Amy's reunion with Laurie is also the closest to the novel.

  • The film's nonlinear narrative structure provides an unexpected twist

  • on this frequently adapted story.

  • This adaptation explores the themes woven into the subtext of Little Women

  • while retaining its charm and emotional core.

  • The growing list of literary and cinematic retellings,

  • spin-offs, and sequels of Little Women,

  • not to mention its appearance in audio dramas and on the stage,

  • demonstrate its influence well beyond the written page.

  • Writing gave Louisa May Alcott the opportunity to immortalize some aspects of her life

  • in a style that was new and original.

  • Since then, a significant number of writers have been impacted by Little Women.

  • The novel's blend of realism and idealism

  • has charmed and provoked readers for over 150 years,

  • inspiring lively discussions over this story about family, love, perseverance,

  • and the power of literature.

  • Little Women is actually the first in a series of four books

  • chronicling the lives of the March sisters.

  • Most editions combine the first two volumes,

  • the latter of which was written in less than a year.

  • Let us know which adaptation of Little Women you love the most.

  • Thanks for watching!

Throughout the history of television and film,

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級

本 vs. 映画。映画とテレビの中の小さな女たち(1933年、1949年、1994年、2017年、2019年 (Book vs. Movie: Little Women in Film & TV (1933, 1949, 1994, 2017, 2019))

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    Vera に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語