Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • There are those who say that kids these days don't

  • read books.

  • But that's just not true.

  • Millennials and whatever we're calling the generation

  • after millennials are actually more well-read on average

  • than earlier generations and also read more books per year.

  • And believe it or not, we have the likes

  • of the "Hunger Games" and "Harry Potter" and even "Twilight"

  • to thank for that.

  • So thanks, YA.

  • Young adult is a term whose meaning has varied wildly

  • over the years.

  • It can apply to coming of age tragedies

  • or serialized adventures of babysitters

  • or insert really dated twilight joke here.

  • But where did this young adult genre come from?

  • And why did it get so big?

  • While narratives for children have

  • existed since people started telling stories,

  • a designated literary market for that mysterious, magical period

  • of time known as teenagerdom is somewhat new.

  • And to be fair, teenagers weren't

  • a designated demographic in most respects

  • until around World War II, due in part to advances

  • in psychology, sociological changes,

  • like the abolishment of child labor,

  • and even technological advances like the car

  • making it easy to sneak out of your parents' house.

  • But suddenly, teens are here.

  • And with them come a plethora of shiny,

  • new things marketed to them, clothes, music, films,

  • radio programs, and of course, the novel.

  • In 1942, Maureen Daly, herself only 17 years old,

  • publishes the "Seventeenth Summer,"

  • which some have called the first young adult novel.

  • "Seventeenth Summer" featured plot points and themes

  • particularly to teens, under age drinking, driving, dating,

  • and the, of course, eternally popular angst.

  • But it wasn't the great literary critics

  • of the time who defined this new category of fiction.

  • It was librarians, in particular, librarians

  • from the New York Public Library.

  • Starting in 1906, Anne Carroll Moore built a, sort of,

  • League of Extraordinary Librarians, women

  • who were interested not only in keeping

  • this nascent adolescent audience in libraries

  • but also finding out what made them tick.

  • Another young librarian brought on by more, Mabel Williams

  • began working with her peers to find books

  • in both the children's and adult sections that

  • might be of interest to teens.

  • And in 1929, the first annual NYPL books

  • for young people list was sent to schools and libraries

  • across the country.

  • In 1944, another NYPL librarian, Margaret Scoggin,

  • changed the name of her library journal column

  • from "Books for Older Boys and Girls"

  • to "Books for Young Adults."

  • And the genre was christened with a name

  • that has lasted to this day.

  • While the YA genre had already been laying down its roots

  • for decades at this point, most YA fiction

  • tended to feature the same generic plot points.

  • Girl dates boy.

  • Maybe they have a fight or something.

  • But then they resolve it.

  • The end.

  • But in the 60s, young people started

  • to see more thoughtful contemplations of what

  • it is just to be a teenager.

  • Hugely noteworthy from this era is

  • S.E. Hinton's, "The Outsiders," published in 1967.

  • At first, a novel that failed on the adult paperback market,

  • the publisher noticed it was mostly being purchased by teens

  • and then re-marketed it to them.

  • And YA allowed itself to explore deeper subjects,

  • ushering in novels like "Are You There, God?

  • It's Me, Margaret" and "The Chocolate War."

  • During the 80s and 90s however, YA

  • started skewing towards serialized fiction,

  • or from the likes of R.L. Stine, school centric fiction

  • like "Sweet Valley High" and "The Baby-Sitters Club"

  • and genre fiction like K.A. Applegate's "Animorphs Series."

  • So while young adult fiction was plenty lucrative,

  • it wasn't really respected by people outside

  • of its targeted readership.

  • It was low art for kids.

  • KID: Yippee!

  • But then everything changed with a boy wizard.

  • In 1997, publisher Bloomsbury takes a leap of faith

  • and publishes "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone."

  • In spite of being genre fiction, "Harry Potter"

  • manages to resound not only with the YA audience,

  • but it also leaks into a large adult market.

  • Harry Potter as a character also grows up

  • with his readers, starting out 11 years old and ending at 17.

  • And the tone of the series matures as well.

  • So this new post "Harry Potter" YA

  • is nearly as long and sometimes longer, sometimes way longer,

  • as adult fiction and on the same reading level

  • as commercial adult fiction.

  • "Harry Potter" also opens the door

  • for a wide variety of darker, genre-based YA novels that

  • can appeal to an audience beyond teens

  • and possibly get optioned for a multi-million dollar movie

  • franchises.

  • With "Twilight," for instance, came a boom

  • in the YA subgenre of paranormal romance.

  • And boy, that sure was a thing that came and went.

  • "The Hunger Games" popularized the subgenre of YA dystopia.

  • And that, also, was a thing that came and went really quickly.

  • And now, well, genre fiction is still popular in YA.

  • But the trend has cycled back to discussing

  • relevant social issues and the world as it is.

  • John Green's, "The Fault In Our Stars"

  • was a massive hit that dealt with kids who fall

  • in love while dying of cancer.

  • And one of the most popular YA books of the last year

  • was Angie Thomas's, "The Hate You Give,"

  • which was partially inspired by the Black Lives Matter

  • movement.

  • And also it was really great.

  • By the way, you should read it.

  • So it's a bit reductive to be dismissive of Young Adult.

  • First of all, it's not just a niche genre.

  • YA is remarkable for its wide appeal.

  • 55% of YA books purchased in 2012

  • were bought by adults between 18 and 44 years old.

  • It's also remarkable to see the emergence of a genre

  • pioneered by women, authors like Maureen Daly, J.K.

  • Rowling, and Angie Thomas, and librarians

  • like Mabel Williams and Margaret Scoggin.

  • Not only does YA shape younger audiences as readers,

  • it is a genre that helps give its audience

  • a lexicon for understanding that there

  • is a complex world between childhood and adulthood.

  • So what does your favorite YA book?

  • Are there any books you love that maybe you didn't realize

  • were categorized as YA?

  • Leave a comment below.

  • "The Great American Read" is a new series

  • on PBS about why we love to read,

  • leading up to a nationwide vote on America's favorite novel.

  • Who decides America's favorite novel, you ask?

  • Well, that would be you.

  • So head to pbs.org/greatamericanread

  • to vote on your favorite book.

  • Check the link in the description for more details.

There are those who say that kids these days don't

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B2 中上級

ヤングアダルト・フィクションの進化を解説(リンゼイ・エリス主演)|IT'S LIT! (The Evolution of YA: Young Adult Fiction, Explained (Feat. Lindsay Ellis) | It's Lit!)

  • 40 2
    Vera に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語