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  • Hey guys!

  • Hi!

  • Kim is joining me today

  • and today we're gonna go over

  • eight useful Japanese phrases

  • that you can use when you're here, travelling, in Japan.

  • In general, I feel like you can get by with only English,

  • Yeah.

  • but, when you're visiting another country,

  • I think it's very polite

  • and, it will help you if you do take the time to learn

  • just a few basic phrases.

  • So, uhm, we're gonna teach you eight on my channel here, today,

  • and then if you wanna head over to Kim's channel,

  • she has a video with eight other useful phrases over there.

  • Yeah.

  • Just a quick note before we get started with the phrases,

  • I didn't go into any detail about particles,

  • like uh,

  • *Japanese on video*

  • Uh, just because I find them pretty difficult to explain,

  • and they're not really needed when

  • you're travelling through Japan

  • and you just need simple phrases to

  • get yourself through your trip.

  • So, I didn't bother explaining them to you guys.

  • I may do that in another video, but, again,

  • they're not necessary

  • so I left them completely out of some of the phrases

  • just to keep them as simple as possible,

  • and, uh, without them the phrases make

  • complete sense

  • even though they're not one hundred percent, uh,

  • grammatically correct.

  • So, yeah, don't worry too much about particles,

  • everyone will understand what you're saying

  • without them.

  • Number one would be "sumimasen".

  • If you're on the street,

  • and you wanna talk to someone,

  • Yeah.

  • Uh, you need their help with something,

  • You wanna just be like, ah, "sumimasen".

  • And it's like "excuse me" in English

  • So, it's just a polite way to stop someone on the street.

  • Yeah.

  • I wouldn't tap them on the shoulder

  • I feel like in Japan you can kind of maybe just

  • go in front of them a bit,

  • and be like ah, "sumimasen"

  • and kind of like bow when you're doing it.

  • And that's a polite way to get someone's attention.

  • So, "sumimasen".

  • "Sumimasen"

  • "Sumimasen"

  • Number two is "doko desu ka", which means

  • "where is something".

  • So, you can say "resutoran ha doko desu ka",

  • which is like, "where's the resturant".

  • "Where is the resturant", yeah.

  • Or, let's teach them important ones like "eki".

  • "eki ha doko desu ka"

  • "Station".

  • So if you wanna ask where the train station is,

  • "eki ha doko desu ka".

  • Or, "toire"?

  • "Toire", that's an important one.

  • "Toilet".

  • "Toire ha doko desu ka".

  • Oh, one other thing that I think you guys should know

  • is "kouban".

  • Which is "police box",

  • and it's like a small little police station that,

  • nearly every town has one,

  • so if you have any sort of problem and you wanna find

  • the police and ask for their help,

  • you can say "kouban ha doko desu ka".

  • "Kouban ha doko desu ka".

  • And the police in Japan are really friendly,

  • They are really friendly.

  • They're not intimidating and scary like they are in Canada,

  • and probably America.

  • Yeah.

  • They're really friendly,

  • and even if you just wanna ask for directions to somewhere,

  • don't be afraid to talk to the police here.

  • Yeah.

  • They're really great.

  • Yeah.

  • Okay, I'm sure most of you know this one,

  • but number three is "arigatou gozaimasu".

  • "Arigatou gozaimasu", "thank you".

  • Uhm, I just think it's nice for you to like,

  • use a little bit of Japanese.

  • and even if you only remember one phrase,

  • I feel like "arigatou gozaimasu" is the best one.

  • Because you can use it everywhere.

  • Yeah, and Japanese people appreciate it when you just

  • try to speak Japanese.

  • Yeah, like of course they will understand "thank you"

  • if you say thank you,

  • everyone has a very basic level of English here at least,

  • But, yeah, if you try to use their language

  • and say it in Japanese, "arigatou gozaimasu",

  • I think they'll be really happy that you're putting in the effort.

  • Sorry, I'm talking Japanese really fast.

  • It's like natural for me,

  • But, "arigatou gozaimasu".

  • "Arigatou gozaimasu".

  • That's a really polite way to say it,

  • and you can short it to just like "arigatou",

  • "arigatou",

  • but if you wanna be polite you should add the "gozaimasu" on the end.

  • Number four is something "ikitai desu".

  • "Ikitai desu" means "I want to go somewhere", so you add

  • something at the front, where you wanna go,

  • and then you add "ikitai desu".

  • For example,

  • "shoppingu mooru",

  • So for example, yeah, "shoppingu mooru ni ikitai desu".

  • So, "I wanna go to the shopping mall", or

  • "resutoran ni ikitai desu", so, "I want to go to the restaurant".

  • Or, "eki ni ikitai desu",

  • "I want to go to the station".

  • So, it's very useful.

  • Yeah, so if you're with like a Japanese friend

  • and you wanna tell them what you wanna do today,

  • you can use this phrase.

  • If you go up to someone on the street and say,

  • "sumimasen, resutoran ni ikitai desu",

  • maybe they'll point you in the direction

  • of a good restaurant or something.

  • So, yeah, it's a very useful phrase.

  • Number five is "arimasu ka".

  • "Arimasu ka".

  • You're asking if something exists, an inanimate object.

  • There's a different way to ask if an animate object exists,

  • but I'm not gonna get into that today.

  • But if you wanna ask "shoppingu mooru arimasu ka",

  • "is there a shopping mall",

  • I think it's kind of like,

  • insinuated that you want one in this area

  • So, you can just

  • if you go up to someone and say "shoppingu mooru arimasu ka",

  • they're gonna point you in the direction of a shopping mall.

  • Or if you're in a store,

  • Yeah.

  • you could use it in a store.

  • Yeah, so say if you want like

  • a clothing item

  • uhm, or anything that you want,

  • say for example,

  • "T-shatsu"

  • Yeah, so say for example you want a T-shirt

  • you can say, "T-shatsu arimasu ka".

  • So, "is there a T-shirt"

  • and they'll show you if they have a T-shirt.

  • Or at a resturant,

  • "katsudon arimasu ka",

  • "do you have 'katsudon' at this restaurant".

  • So, it can be used in so many different places,

  • so it's a really useful one.

  • Yeah.

  • So, number six!

  • Ah, this one I've used a lot,

  • and it is something "nakushimashita",

  • and that means "I've lost something".

  • And, uhm, you can use this with different things like,

  • say for example, "pasupooto nakishimashita".

  • Or, uh, "saifu nakishimashita".

  • So, you know, you lost your passport, you lost your wallet.

  • So if you want to go to the police station and be like,

  • "sumimasen, saifu nakushimashita",

  • so, "sorry, I lost my wallet".

  • If you think you left it in a certain store or restaurant,

  • you can just go there and be like,

  • "sumimasen, saifu nakushimashita".

  • And, maybe they'll be like, "Oh, have one! Here, we found it!"

  • Yeah.

  • So, yeah. "Nakushimashita".

  • It's very common to lose things when you're travelling

  • Yep.

  • Keys, uh, passport, wallet...

  • key is "kagi",

  • passport, "pasupooto",

  • Or your phone.

  • Uh, phone! That's a good one! "Keitai".

  • "Ketai" is a cellular phone.

  • Uhm, I think those are the important ones.

  • Yeah, those are most of them.

  • Yeah.

  • Or "kaban", maybe?

  • "Kaban", yeah! My bag.

  • Yeah.

  • "Kaban", backpack or bag.

  • They can all be called "kaban".

  • Yeah.

  • "Kaban nakushimashita".

  • Number seven is one you can use when you're entering a store

  • and you're not sure if you should take off your shoes or not.

  • There are some resturants, or some change rooms,

  • or just some areas in stores where you may need

  • to take off your shoes.

  • so if you're unsure, you can ask "kutsu daijyoubu desu ka".

  • "Kutsu" is "shoes" and

  • "daijyoubu desu ka" is asking "is it okay".

  • So you're just asking really simply,

  • "are shoes okay".

  • So if you ask them "kutsu daijyoubu desu ka",

  • and they're not okay,

  • they'll probably be like,

  • "ah, dame",

  • or like "ah, sumimasen, dame desu"

  • or like uh, "nuide kudasai", "please take them off".

  • You'll probably be able to tell by their gestures whether it's okay or not,

  • but if you're unsure in any situation, just ask

  • it's very polite to ask, uhm, if you should be taking your shoes off or not.

  • So don't be shy to use that.

  • So, the last one is a bit long,

  • so I'm gonna break it up for you.

  • So the first part is: "nihongo wakarimasen",

  • and that means "I don't understand Japanese".

  • And then you can say: "eigo dekimasu ka",

  • which means "can you speak english".

  • So, that's very useful if you can't speak Japanese.

  • and you want to tell someone,

  • and ask them if they can speak English.

  • Right, so you could just go up to people on the street

  • if you really need someone that speaks English.

  • "Sumimasen, nihongo wakarimasen, eigo dekimasu ka".

  • Or even, it could just be "sumimasen, eigo dekimasu ka".

  • Yeah, you can use that as well.

  • There's been times when I was in Japan,

  • and there were times where I really had to use English

  • for important things.

  • And I couldn't say it in Japanese, so I'd just say,

  • "eigo dekimasu ka", and then they would either reply

  • "yes" or "no".

  • So usually if they can't speak English they'll say,

  • "Oh, a little," or something like that, yeah.

  • And sometimes, even when they're really good at English,

  • they'll still just be like "Ahh, a little!"

  • And they're almost fluent.

  • They're really modest.

  • Yeah, very modest

  • But, there are many people who can speak

  • a generous amount of English,

  • so if you really need English, I think if you search well enough,

  • you will be able to find somebody who can help you.

  • So, uhm, don't be afraid to try.

  • Yeah.

  • Alright, so those are eight phrases