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  • Hillary.

  • One.

  • Have a good time so far?

  • Yes.

  • Good.

  • Okay, think audience first.

  • Always.

  • Please thing.

  • Audience first.

  • Always.

  • Now when you use any of these presentation tools as a vehicle toe design any presentation in any shape or form and you don't think audience first.

  • Well, there's a big risk that your presentation could become a waste of your time and, worst of all, a waste off their time.

  • So why, that's the question wide way Insist that you must think about the audience when you design representation from start to finish.

  • And that's because I've come across many presentations in my life, and I've come to the conclusion that there are all the opposite presenter first, always.

  • Now these top of presentations are when the presenter is writing what he thinks.

  • It's important in every single slide and rather putting what the audience thinks it's really important for them and what could change their lives.

  • So I'm here to tell you that, um, I'm gonna share with you a very simple but yet memorable alternative and how you can engage your audience effectively.

  • So little story time.

  • I'm a full time artist right now, but 15 years ago.

  • I used to look workout.

  • Sherman Williams.

  • So if you can imagine, I'm on artist working.

  • Sure, Williams.

  • It's kind of like my Willy won't get chocolate Factory, but with paint.

  • So Sherry was really nice with us, and they send us to many workshops and presentations and for training purposes.

  • So I mean, the presentations were good.

  • They had a great topic.

  • It was interesting, but it was lacking something.

  • And I started realized this when when I went to this workshops that there was a connection that was lost between the percenter and the audience.

  • And then I start getting curious and I said, Okay, I'm gonna read a bunch of books and see how I can make memorable presentations.

  • And that's what I did.

  • I started reading books.

  • I went to workshops and all just so that I could percent at work and probably make something different.

  • Okay, so after five years working in, sure, Williams, I decided to become an entrepreneur.

  • And, you know, entrepreneurs have a bunch of ideas, another, a bunch of business ideas, and one of my idea was to become our presentation coach or representation consultant.

  • And then I started to think about this.

  • And I said, Okay, what qualifies me as a consultant?

  • I only have, like, five years working experience.

  • And I was looking at 30 35 40 45 years experience, and I Okay, what can I do here?

  • You know, I really wanna be presentation consultant or a presentation, coach.

  • So then I said Okay, what do I have?

  • You know, in my life, when short lifespan, you know what quality keep it qualifies me.

  • So I said, OK, I've read the books.

  • I've been two different seminars.

  • One of my favorite ones was at Warner Communications in Palo Alto.

  • And I've been an artist since I was in third rate.

  • So that could come in handy when I thought, uh, presentation design.

  • And then I said, Okay, it's study marketing, so I can use that when I have to teach about howto research the audience.

  • And then at the end, it was like a theater major soloist.

  • You know, the theater.

  • And I said, Okay, I'm gonna use this knowledge to show you acting techniques and combat states right, which is a big problem for more speakers.

  • So in That's me as evil eye Fliegel in the play, American little Abner.

  • So, uh, I know what you might be thinking is like, Okay, this guy's a theater major.

  • Of course he can present.

  • So this is gonna be a waste of my time, right?

  • No.

  • Wrong.

  • Hold on to your horses because you don't need to be, ah, theater expert to deliver awesome and memorable presentations.

  • So but let me be a little crystal clear here.

  • When I started doing this and I started my delivering and giving the presentation so like students, I was amazed that they just didn't get that presenter.

  • I mean, the audience first, always.

  • And I said, Okay, what am I doing wrong?

  • They kept on doing the same thing, and I didn't want to change.

  • And so what?

  • I'm doing wrong.

  • So So then I realized something a big groups and I said, Okay, I think I'm trying to teach people that want to become presenters or better presenters.

  • And what I'm trying to do is teach percenters.

  • But actually, I was teaching an audience, and when you teach an audience to present, you have to keep things as simple as possible.

  • And that's because if you are simplest possible, you could become memorable, and that's very important.

  • So I got an idea.

  • There was a bunch of presentation techniques and tips there, out them, the books, videos everywhere.

  • And I was like, This is overwhelming, even overwhelming for me, which I thought it was cool to make presentations.

  • So then I said, Okay, I have an idea.

  • Okay, I'm gonna get these tips, and I'm gonna prioritize them, and I'm gonna show a simpler way.

  • So that percenter actually would want to change and not say Okay, there's a bunch of things I have to do.

  • I'm just gonna keep on doing this.

  • So why don't we do this killer whale and all that?

  • Nothing.

  • No, not interesting.

  • It keeps, you know, not engaged.

  • It's boring.

  • It's the same thing.

  • But why do we do this?

  • And we do it because it may be a cz power point's fault, right?

  • And why not?

  • Yeah, he they say Okay, click toe a title right here.

  • Click to a text bullet, bullet, bullet, bullet.

  • You wanna throw in a picture?

  • You know, there you go.

  • You wanna keep Graff?

  • Put it on as well.

  • So I thought that that was with what's happening.

  • Okay, power points.

  • Bold.

  • But let me tell you something interesting.

  • Most people these days, I actually think that presentations are boring.

  • And why that's because we're entertained the whole day were entertained about, you know, APS and social media trends.

  • Like, you know, Prince Harry and his wife Fennel, that hold, you know, mess entertaining.

  • So why, of course they're gonna find boring.

  • You know, most of the presentation.

  • Now there's Ah, there's just a statistic.

  • Actually, there was a survey that, uh, this guy from presentation Panda, the CEO, decided to conduct.

  • They said Okay, I'm gonna get people from all parts of the world, and we're gonna give them a survey.

  • And it was between entertaining and boring.

  • And the result was a 79% agreed that most presentations are boring.

  • Now, think about this.

  • There is a tremendous competitive advantage here because it almost 80% 80% of the presentations out there according to this survey, are boring.

  • Then think what you can do with the other 20%.

  • So you're missing out a big time opportunity there?

  • No, let me tell you, presentation tools are really cool, and they are cool if you know how to use them.

  • Well, if you use them well, you would actually have on audience that will follow your ideas and spread them like a brushfire.

  • It just does its magical and most importantly, take action.

  • So let me share with you.

  • And this is a great picture by my friend Alex.

  • And let me share with you when I call the perfect tip mix.

  • Okay?

  • And it's five tips.

  • No more than that.

  • So you will be No, they lost on board.

  • Oh, here we go.

  • Tip number one.

  • Tip number one is story structure.

  • Okay.

  • Story structure.

  • It's awesome for presentations.

  • Why?

  • Because we're used to stories for a long time ago.

  • And we're used to stories every day.

  • I think about it.

  • Have you Anybody has heard a joke before?

  • Okay, you hear a joke?

  • And aren't you amazed that you can tell that same joke one year later without rehearsing it?

  • And that's because it has the story structure in it, and we're used to it.

  • It's kind of like our six cents right there.

  • Okay, So when once you get story structure Mmm, we get it, we follow it and we remember it.

  • So we're wired in since we're child.

  • A Children with stories.

  • They told us stories in bedtime stories.

  • You know, books.

  • They stories, documentaries right now for kids.

  • I mean, they're everywhere.

  • So think about this of story structure for presentation.

  • It's a little bit complicated.

  • It has a bunch of things around, but I'm gonna simplify it for you.

  • We're gonna just look att, three basic parts.

  • These are the beginning.

  • A middle and a cold twitch.

  • Notice that this isn't on end because most presentations I've seen on I came across.

  • It's like, Okay, I'm giving representation and everything like that, you know, Little knocking Sanel Sudden, thank you very much.

  • And it was like, OK, it's finished.

  • It's done.

  • I mean, that's the end, but But there's no call to action actually telling people what you want them to do or to follow they get lost with.

  • And the cult traction is something.

  • It's probably the most important thing that they remember.

  • Okay, so this doesn't have a story structure method in it.

  • It's just a bunch of slides with a bunch of information and sometimes some pictures in them.

  • But it's crammed so it doesn't work.

  • Tip number two, Research your audience.

  • So when I say think audience first always.

  • This is the first thing you have to do.

  • You have an idea, and then you say, OK, who am I gonna present it to?

  • And then you see Okay, what's the audience?

  • What do they like?

  • Who are they?

  • Are the female male E.

  • I mean, if they come from far away, what gets them fired up?

  • So you have to think about the audience and research them well.

  • So when you design a presentation, you design it around the audience.

  • Tip number three Now, probably people have told you this before, but I'm gonna be a little bit more graphic with it.

  • So sale pre slides.

  • So think about this.

  • Why would you want to cram things on one same slide their free.

  • I mean, they don't I mean, it's not like they're five bucks per slide, So I mean, there's no no, not an idea that says OK, you know, you have to use only five slides, because if it takes I mean, I have 63 slides in my presentation right here, you see, so there's no rule as to how many slights you wanna put in a presentation?

  • Tip number four.

  • If you do this, please don't do it this way.

  • I mean, I've seen it in businesses.

  • I mean, I'm sitting there in, uh, you know, people that want to present something.

  • But a chart that looks like this when you're presenting it.

  • I mean, I'm gonna be talking about this part, but you're gonna be trying to read that because that you can't greet it because it's so small.

  • So don't do this.

  • Try something different.

  • Another medic.

  • Think about us.

  • Okay.

  • Plane crashes.

  • Plane crashes are rare and surviving a plane crash.

  • It's almost impossible.

  • Right?

  • Ran.

  • Think about this.

  • Out of 53.4000 people involved in plane crashes from 1983 to 2000 in the United States, 51.2000 survive.

  • Now think about it.

  • 96% survival rate.

  • So if you're in a plane crash and almost crashing, don't worry.

  • You have a 96% chance to survive.

  • I mean, that's another way you can look at it.

  • Okay?

  • It's one slide of the time.

  • It's simple and effective.

  • Tip number.

  • Fine.

  • Now, this is the mother of old tips.

  • So I'm gonna ask you this like William Shakespeare, friends, students, Pro Jin's, Then your ears.

  • Are you ready?

  • Sticky dotes.

  • Sticky notes are incredible for presentation.

  • I mean, I think about this sticky notes if you get a sticking out there.

  • Okay?

  • You start writing on a sticky note, and you put it in a wall and you're moving around.

  • You're using your hands.

  • It kind of regresses.

  • You like a time machine when you were kids and you played with Legos and you had this imagination that just flew everything right there.

  • Right.

  • So sticky notes.

  • First step, you have to do with the stick bringing store.

  • Okay.

  • How do you bring some?

  • You put one word or one phrase or one sentence, but no more than one idea per stick you and just let it flow.

  • Just let in a particular order.

  • Just put him around.

  • Put him around.

  • You know, messing Moreau put us many as you can.

  • Okay.

  • Step number two.

  • Your group, them your group, the different sticking ALS.

  • How will you find the ones that are similar to each other and then you group that and then you grew up another one.

  • Then you can add more ideas on each group.

  • Then you identify each group.

  • He put a title on it.

  • His word or phrase or sentence.

  • Okay, but then you grouped them, and you identified the next step after this.

  • And I'm gonna included here, but is you find one sticky, which is one idea, and you convert that into a visual.

  • It could be a nim ege.

  • It could be a chart.

  • I mean, it could be a key word.