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  • - Hi everyone, Sal Khan here

  • for our daily homeroom.

  • For those of y'all who are new to this,

  • Khan Academy, we are

  • not-for-profit with a mission

  • of providing a free world-class education

  • for anyone, anywhere.

  • And when we saw the mass school closures,

  • not just in the United States,

  • but around the world,

  • there's now over 1.4 billion students around the world

  • who normally would go

  • to school, who aren't.

  • We realized that above and beyond

  • the resources that Khan Academy has been creating for years,

  • and offering for free

  • for teachers, students and parents,

  • for students inside of classrooms

  • and outside of classrooms around the world,

  • that it's our duty to step up and do more.

  • So we've been doing things like parent and teacher webinars,

  • we've been publishing things

  • like the daily schedules for different age groups,

  • that some of y'all might be familiar with.

  • And we are also doing this livestream,

  • and it's a way to stay connected

  • in this time of social distancing.

  • It's a way

  • to answer any questions that you might have,

  • and it's also a way to have interesting conversations

  • that are related to what's going on around us.

  • It could be related to education,

  • or it could be related to just the broader environment.

  • I do wanna say a few thank you's.

  • As I mentioned, we're a not-for-profit.

  • We're funded with philanthropic donations.

  • Even before the COVID crisis we were running at a deficit.

  • And now our traffic on Khan Academy is about two and a half,

  • it looks like, I looked this morning,

  • it's about 2.8 what it normally is.

  • And so that only increases our cost.

  • So if you're in a position to do so,

  • please think about helping us out,

  • khanacademy.org/donate.

  • And I wanna give a special thanks

  • to several corporations who stepped up

  • over the last couple of weeks in record time,

  • to help us with this COVID response.

  • These include folks like Bank of America,

  • which was the first to step up.

  • And shortly thereafter, AT&T,

  • Google.org and NORVATIS.

  • And that's above and beyond many of the foundations

  • and philanthropists and corporations like AMGEN,

  • that have funded Khan Academy through the years.

  • And as much as that funding helps,

  • I do wanna emphasize

  • that we still need more.

  • We're still operating at a significant deficit.

  • So funding at any level helps.

  • Over the weekend I put a video out on YouTube,

  • essentially just doing what I just did,

  • saying that we,

  • someone put that video onto Reddit,

  • and over the weekend it helped raise us a lot of money.

  • So thank you for doing that.

  • That definitely spread the word.

  • But I also wanna emphasize that

  • we are still running at a deficit and depleting our reserves

  • in order to do what we're doing.

  • So what we're gonna do today, like always,

  • whether you're watching this on YouTube, Facebook,

  • or some other social media channel.

  • This is changing day by day.

  • We're getting fancier every day.

  • But start posting questions.

  • I have access to some of them,

  • and then some of our team members are

  • looking at those questions,

  • and they're putting it up on a doc that I can read.

  • But we have a special guest today.

  • Our special guest today is a teacher

  • by the name of Tim Vandenberg,

  • who teaches sixth grade students in Hesperian, California.

  • And I think there's a couple of really interesting,

  • or many interesting things to talk to Tim about.

  • But when you think about the questions,

  • you can ask questions for me.

  • But also, you can pose questions,

  • whether you're a teacher, parent or student,

  • from a really impressive teacher

  • that'll help us think about how Khan Academy

  • can be used in the classroom for maximum impact,

  • but also maybe some ways to think about

  • how it could be used at home during the closures.

  • So Tim, thanks for joining us.

  • - Hi, Sal.

  • - And I actually, I was watching

  • this documentary about Monopoly, recently.

  • And beyond being a superstar teacher,

  • you are also, what was it,

  • number two in the country in Monopoly?

  • - At the last US Championships, I placed second place.

  • So they say that puts me at rank number two in the country.

  • So it was a lot of fun.

  • - You're such a sucker, Tim (laughs)

  • (Tim laughs)

  • - My sixth graders helped train me, so yeah.

  • - Oh, okay

  • So we might have a few champions in that group too.

  • So maybe,

  • a good place to start, - Yes.

  • You know, tell us tell everybody how you've,

  • you know, pre-COVID crisis,

  • how you were using Khan Academy in your classroom?

  • The types of students that you've been trying to help out,

  • where were they before?

  • And then what have you seen since?

  • - Well, with Khan Academy,

  • and so what I decided is,

  • I'm gonna make my sixth graders go back

  • to the early grade levels,

  • do early math, arithmetic,

  • the lower grade levels,

  • (machine beeps)

  • on Khan Academy,

  • to master and fill in the holes like you've described

  • so well on your many videos,

  • that I encourage people to go watch.

  • And by having them go back and review,

  • and fill in those gaps,

  • these very low disadvantaged,

  • highly diverse kids, who were basically

  • failing their lower grade skills

  • on the state test for California.

  • They ended up absolutely doing fantastic

  • on their state test results over the last three years,

  • and it would have been four years in a row,

  • but California decided

  • not to have state testing this year

  • due to the emergency health situation.

  • But we have a data chart I can show

  • the absolutely amazing results using mastery learning,

  • I think your team is gonna post that up.

  • So on the left hand side you can see,

  • on how these kids did in fifth grade

  • compared to their California,

  • county and district peers.

  • And this is compared to the green line on top,

  • that is a passing score in fifth grade,

  • over to a passing score in sixth grade, on the right.

  • And you see my kids are basically the average kid

  • in California and the county and district,

  • and my class are very far below grade level.

  • But using the mastery learning model

  • that is so powerful and easy to do on Khan Academy,

  • my kids average growing 95 points last year,

  • and pretty much the same the last two years

  • before that as well.

  • Compare that to the average kid in California,

  • went up just over one point.

  • One point of growth,

  • and that's the best scores I can find

  • over the last three years in California,

  • was two years ago.

  • That's almost 95 times the growth

  • of the average kid in California.

  • That doesn't mean every kid,

  • but that's the average. - And just to make sure,

  • and just to make sure

  • I understand this chart,

  • what this shows is,

  • on the left hand side,

  • the left point is,

  • performance on the fifth grade state test.

  • - And then,

  • on the right data dot, - Yeah.

  • - the performance of sixth grade.

  • So a student who just tracks that green line on the left,

  • that means they're right at grade level for fifth grade.

  • And then a year later,

  • they're right at sixth grade for sixth grade.

  • So that would be what essentially the standards,

  • or the assessments expect of students,

  • essentially you get a year of learning in a year.

  • And it looks like California on average,

  • starts fifth grade well below grade level,

  • and then starts sixth grade well below grade,

  • or starts the year well below grade level

  • and then ends the year well below grade level,

  • but there's about a grade level of growth.

  • Your students, - Yeah,

  • - and I think if I read some of your background,

  • 90% of them were below grade level

  • and what you're looking at,

  • we're looking at - Right.

  • - is the average,

  • but significantly below grade level,

  • you're talking you know,

  • high needs student body, 100% free and reduced lunch.

  • But over the course of the year,

  • almost all of them being significantly

  • below grade level,

  • to almost all of them being significantly

  • above grade level, after a year.

  • - Exactly.

  • And this is for,

  • teachers might understand this,

  • parents may not quite grasp this.

  • But this is absolutely amazing growth,

  • and this is real.

  • And this is not teaching to the test,

  • this is lives changed.

  • These kids now believe that

  • they can learn math and master math,

  • all thanks to mastery learning model on Khan Academy.

  • Because they actually want - Something I want

  • to make sure,

  • - to be filling those out,

  • - So explain that, explain how those gaps

  • are actually filled in.

  • What's interesting is,

  • these are sixth grade students,

  • and you're starting them off many times at early learning,

  • which is kindergarten first,

  • second grade arithmetic type content.

  • And many folks could say wait,

  • if they're gonna go all the way back there,

  • how can they ever get to grade level content,

  • much less get ahead of grade level?

  • - Right, so during the school year

  • while still simultaneously teaching

  • and mastering the sixth grade skills,

  • which is very hard for them,

  • because they don't have the foundations,

  • we also, I require them to go back

  • and do the course challenges and the unit tests

  • for all of the lower grade levels.

  • So that math actually starts to make sense to them,

  • so that they truly become math masters and champions,

  • and actually start believing that this

  • is something they can do.

  • And the majority of them I graduate

  • and send them off to honors class,

  • or above grade level classes

  • in junior high because of this.

  • - And so this is really a bit of an idea of,

  • as you can say, even going slowly or go fast.

  • We talked a lot about it here at Khan Academy

  • is that in a traditional model,

  • let's say a student gets an 80% on you know,

  • their <