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  • - Hello, lovely people.

  • Welcome to episode two of my desperate attempt

  • to find a power mobility aid that works for me.

  • And in the process, hopefully share some info

  • that may be helpful to others.

  • Or just weirdly entertaining.

  • Oh, believe me, there is some info in this video

  • that I really wish I had known earlier.

  • And that really makes me look like an idiot,

  • but will probably make you really laugh a lot.

  • If you're new to my channel,

  • and you've only seen videos

  • in which I'm spinning around in heels or dancing,

  • you may be thinking,

  • "But Jessica, why do you even need to use a mobility aid

  • "if you can walk?"

  • Well friends, I'm what's called

  • an ambulatory wheelchair user.

  • That's a person who has limited mobility,

  • and needs an aid to move around,

  • but is capable of walking in some circumstances.

  • The reasons for having limited mobility can vary,

  • from fatigue, to joint pain, unsteadiness and injuries,

  • to yes, being paralyzed.

  • I personally am very unsteady on my feet.

  • I suffer from fatigue and pain,

  • and I have a neurological condition

  • that means I occasionally paralyze my limbs.

  • (bell dings)

  • Bingo.

  • Episode one is linked in the card above,

  • and should also be in the description below.

  • In this episode, however, I decided that the best way

  • to get a feel of do I buy a power chair,

  • or do I buy a mobility scooter

  • would be to rent one of each

  • and try them out for a week.

  • And not just going to the shops try them out, no.

  • I decided to take the power chair

  • to the YouTube convention Summer in the City,

  • and the mobility scooter to Brighton Pride,

  • which was a really great idea.

  • Until it really, really wasn't.

  • Honestly, that mobility scooter caused the first bit

  • of actual marital strife my wife and I have ever had.

  • And I thought at one point

  • she was going to push the scooter into traffic.

  • Not with me in, calm down!

  • So what is a mobility scooter?

  • Well, it's kind of a one-person golf buggy,

  • crossed with a motor scooter.

  • They're battery powered,

  • and can be recharged using mains electricity.

  • Although there are different types available,

  • all mobility scooters have bike style steering

  • to direct the wheels.

  • They have padded up-right seats and very simple controls.

  • The maximum speed for the road scooters

  • is eight miles an hour.

  • And you don't need a license to drive it,

  • so go me, even on roads.

  • When driving on pavements, however,

  • you should limit yourself to four miles an hour.

  • It has taken me months and months to make this video,

  • because whenever I think about it, I panic.

  • I panic that I'm going to be spending lots of money

  • on the wrong thing.

  • I panic that I don't actually know what the wrong thing is.

  • I panic, because I feel guilty that I want the option

  • that looks more stylish, but is more expensive.

  • Even though I know that if I get something that's ugly,

  • or it looks medical.

  • I have a lot of issues with things that look medical,

  • it's a thing.

  • I won't actually use it.

  • And I also panic,

  • because I know that as a human with brain damage,

  • I'm actually not at best place

  • to choose the thing that works for me.

  • Because A, I'm aware I have an inability

  • to tell scams from genuine shops.

  • And it paths the way,

  • I swing from assuming everything is a lie

  • to being far too trusting.

  • And also B, I actually don't really know

  • what's best for myself.

  • Remember, just because I can list the kings of England

  • doesn't mean I can cross the road safely.

  • And then, I feel this huge amount of guilt

  • for not being able to look after myself,

  • and make these very important adult choices

  • and having to get help.

  • And wow, this is not where I saw this video going.

  • Hi, welcome to my channel.

  • Subscribe for more therapy sessions.

  • Now while we're here, move on.

  • I have to say, using the mobility scooter felt amazing.

  • It handled pavements in a way I hadn't expected it to.

  • It didn't make me feel weird.

  • It was great being able to easily move around without pain,

  • and it had this pretty little basket,

  • where I could store bottles of Diet Coke, vital.

  • I mean, what more could you ask for?

  • I mean, okay, it was actually pretty terrible

  • at getting onto a bus.

  • And you'll see.

  • There was a thing.

  • All right, we're now gonna try and get on the bus

  • with the scooter.

  • What do you think?

  • - Fingers crossed.

  • - We can see it coming,

  • and there are an awful lot of people on it already, so.

  • (upbeat music)

  • Things we've learned in the expedition on the bus.

  • It is very hard to maneuver.

  • I kind of had largest thing off the bus,

  • it's a very tight turning circle.

  • I very much failed to do so,

  • hit the wall,

  • and the bus driver, bless him,

  • just came and like picked up the back of the scooter,

  • and essentially dragged me off,

  • whilst telling me how to maneuver and turn.

  • And I was like, "I'm sorry, I'm so sorry."

  • And just continued to bash into him.

  • Thank goodness, Brighton Buses, A+, you did really well.

  • I failed to drive well, but that's on me.

  • This is new, I'm learning.

  • It'll be fine.

  • So it'll be interesting to see

  • whether that's any different with a power chair.

  • I imagine somewhat easier,

  • because the turning circle is it.

  • It just turns on itself,

  • rather than you having to do a big loop.

  • Also, there were so many people on the bus,

  • because, obviously, it's Pride.

  • So it might be easier with this,

  • just day to day shopping, going into town.

  • (bright upbeat music)

  • Very steep road.

  • Aw, can you see?

  • And normally, I would be really struggling going up here.

  • But no, who's struggling?

  • - I am.

  • - Yes, you can do it.

  • Go, go, go.

  • And I'm very calm.

  • Thank you, scooter.

  • Okay, so the weirdest thing just happened.

  • Sat outside the court,

  • waiting for call checks to my little scooter,

  • looking at my phone on Instagram.

  • And then this entire crowd,

  • I don't know, students, just came and like stood around me,

  • talking to each other, completely ignoring my existence.

  • Like looking literally over me.

  • I was jut like hello.

  • (bright upbeat music)

  • So I walked around without the scooter for ages,

  • because it's way too busy to be going around

  • with the scooter.

  • And now we're trying to leave the park,

  • on the scooter again, obviously,

  • 'cause my legs are so tired.

  • But the only way to get back home really quickly

  • is up an incredibly steep hill,

  • so we'll see how we do.

  • So we decided, we could get a taxi,

  • and take the chair apart and put it in the taxi.

  • But that would require cash,

  • and all the cashpoints

  • have like a half hour queue in front of them right now,

  • so that's a bit much.

  • So no, we're gonna go on an adventure

  • and get back home ourselves.

  • Hopefully, it won't run out of charge.

  • Yeah, that's right, women power.

  • We don't need taxis.

  • Oh, oh, and we're down to one.

  • We're down to one.

  • Are you pushing me, Claud?

  • - No.

  • (laughs)

  • - We've run out of battery half way up the hill.

  • That's how much more we have to go,

  • but this is how much we did.

  • So that's not bad.

  • Turned it off.

  • Hopefully when I turn it on again, there will be something.

  • Up the hill. - Maneuver it, darling.

  • - Made it up the hill.

  • That hill.

  • - And I push it.

  • - It's terrible.

  • You did really well, baby.

  • Is your heart still beating terribly?

  • Doubt that it has this automatic breaking system

  • where if it's going too fast.

  • And we're trying to go down hill,

  • so Claud doesn't have too push so much.

  • But the automatic breaks mean it does that

  • if it's going too fast.

  • So Claudia's decided we're not buying this.

  • Okay, look, we're going slow, we're fine.

  • Wait, is it starting to rain?

  • I think I just felt a raindrop.

  • Thank god, I'm married to an able-bodied woman.

  • I'm getting, am I getting off,

  • so you can go over his hill?

  • Okay.

  • Maybe, also we don't get this one.

  • So what have we learned from this scootering experience?

  • Well, I have learned to take a charging cable with me

  • everywhere I go.

  • And also that distance apparently really, really matters.

  • It might seem like it doesn't,

  • because you think, "Oh, I mean 30 miles, that excessive.

  • "When am I going to go 30 miles in my mobility scooter?

  • "I wouldn't, it's only a mile and a half

  • "to where I want to go,

  • "and then a mile and a half back."

  • But that's 30 miles on the flat.

  • I live in a place with incredibly steep hills.

  • It really cuts down, really cuts down on your tiring,

  • so here we are.

  • I've also just managed to run my own mobility scooter

  • over my own foot.

  • I injured my foot with the mobility scooter.

  • I got overwhelmed making this video, can't lie.

  • I have about 50 tabs open on my laptop.

  • And it's a lot of information,

  • and it feels very important.

  • Hopefully, we can dive in together,

  • but if you start feeling overwhelmed,

  • just remember that it's okay, and I am right there with you.

  • A special mention must be given

  • to the scooters that offer something more

  • when it comes to looks.

  • The scooters that really go all out,

  • and look stunningly vintage.

  • I really want these.

  • They're so impractical, again, but I really want them.

  • Anyway, price of a mobility scooter.

  • Clearly, some of them look quite cool.

  • They are generally cheaper than electric wheelchairs.

  • It was really handy having handles in front of my body

  • when I was trying to push through the crowd at Pride.

  • Tilly could sit on my lap when she got tired.

  • I put my handbag between my feet,

  • so it didn't have to be on my