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  • - Khan Academy, welcome to The Daily Homeroom livestream,

  • for those of y'all that this is your first time.

  • This is, really just a way for us to stay connected

  • during school closures.

  • Obviously, Khan Academy we have many resources

  • for students, teachers and parents to be able to work

  • whether the school is in session physically,

  • or, whether it's happening at home,

  • as I think most of y'all are now having to cope with.

  • And we realize, above and beyond those resources,

  • in math and English and language arts, and science

  • and humanities that go from pre-K through college,

  • that we need to provide more support.

  • It's our duty as a not for profit with a mission

  • to provide a free world class education for anyone,

  • anywhere to step up right now in this time of crisis.

  • And so that's why we're doing teacher webinars,

  • parent webinars, this daily homeroom live stream

  • for everyone as well as, things like, the daily schedules

  • that many of y'all are now leveraging.

  • To think about how to structure your days,

  • for students of different age groups.

  • I will remind everyone as I always do,

  • that we are a not for profit organization.

  • And, we are supportive, the only reason we can exist

  • is because of philanthropic donations

  • from folks like yourself.

  • And even before this crisis, we were operating at a deficit

  • and now during this crisis, our server traffic

  • is up two and a half, approaching three times

  • our registrations from students and parents,

  • are actually students and teachers are six fold,

  • parent registrations are 20 fold.

  • So if you're in a position to do so,

  • please think about donating to Khan Academy.

  • I do wanna give a special shout out to several corporations

  • who stepped up in record time when they realized

  • that we needed help and not just generally,

  • but especially in this COVID response period.

  • Bank of America stepped up in that first weekend,

  • followed by AT&T, Google.org and now Novartis,

  • this has been incredible help.

  • Any of you who are corporate leaders

  • or work for corporations, we need more help.

  • So I would love to add logos to this.

  • And for all of you individuals out there,

  • we still are running at a significant deficit.

  • So every donation matters, whether it's as small

  • as the $3 donation, $5, $10.

  • We know that that is hard earned money

  • and, we really appreciate it, but we really do need it,

  • if we wanna support kids around the world,

  • and parents and teachers.

  • So today we have a fairly exciting live stream.

  • We have a clinical psychologist, David Anderson.

  • I encourage everyone, I say this every time

  • to start putting questions on Facebook and YouTube

  • that you might have for either our guest, Dave

  • or myself about anything,

  • but we're gonna talk about something

  • that is very front of mind for a lot of folks right now.

  • We are all socially distanced.

  • Many of us have kids at home,

  • kids are trying to stay learning,

  • but there's many other things that are going on

  • in all of our minds.

  • Anxiety is up, stress is up for everyone.

  • And I'm hoping Dave can help us navigate.

  • And I'm speaking not just as a representative

  • of the Khan Academy community.

  • I'm also speaking as a parent who has seen some of,

  • some of our, some of the difficulties

  • of what we're going through.

  • So thanks for joining us, Dave.

  • And you know, maybe the first question

  • is any general advice you have for parents

  • and students who are just trying

  • to cope with everything going on right now.

  • - Right, well, look, thanks for having me.

  • It's wonderful to be able to be here

  • and to have a forum to kind of talk

  • about some of these things.

  • You know, we have a practice on both coasts,

  • about 60 clinicians in Child Mind Institute,

  • and we're hearing a lot from parents and students.

  • I would say that, you know, the first things

  • that are the top of mind,

  • especially for parents are to manage expectations.

  • I mean, the biggest thing is that none of us

  • have encountered challenges like this before.

  • And I count myself within that with two children.

  • You know, and something we're trying to manage

  • the work lives that we were, attempted managed

  • before this crisis hit with childcare

  • and without many of the major supports that we have,

  • you know, a time of online schooling is tough.

  • It's gonna be tough for anybody.

  • So, some of the first things we talked

  • to parents about are taking it to do lists

  • and that kind of level of perfectionism

  • they would normally expect of themselves.

  • And really trying to edit those things down

  • as much as possible to ensure

  • that there's something manageable each day.

  • And you have a moment to kind of mindfully pause

  • and perhaps enjoy some of the silver linings

  • of this in terms of time spent with family

  • and an opportunity to connect a little bit more.

  • - And what should we keep a lookout on,

  • for our children or even for ourselves?

  • I know you focus on children especially,

  • but as a just a clinical psychologist generally,

  • you know, I think sometimes you can,

  • things can happen in bits and pieces

  • and you know, you've gone too far before and it's too late.

  • And, what should we look out for,

  • signs of difficulty in our kids or even ourselves.

  • - I mean the reality to your point,

  • is we always say this thing that child therapy

  • is so much about it being mediated by the parents,

  • and parents aren't necessarily

  • the cause of the child's particular difficulties,

  • but they're often the solution.

  • So we spent, probably about a half the time

  • spending talking to parents even when the child

  • might be the particular focus of our intervention

  • and you know, in terms of how parents can support kids

  • at the moment and what we can,

  • we can help them to think about,

  • especially with online schooling,

  • cause I'll go back to one of your earlier questions.

  • It's that, you know, we're, everybody's adapting

  • this kind of new normal like, schools are trying

  • to outline assignments in certain ways

  • and make it so that, it's manageable for the kids

  • and they may not necessarily be getting data in real time

  • from parents related to what the kids can handle

  • and what kind of scaffolding they need.

  • I think the kids we're especially concerned

  • about at the moment, for our clinical population

  • are those with mental health and learning disorders

  • that normally are supported in allowing them access

  • to a school curriculum in school,

  • but which, you know, we may see

  • a lack of those kinds of support services

  • or where parents are being asked to be therapists,

  • speech language pathologist and teacher all in one.

  • And that's something that's exceedingly

  • difficult for everybody right now.

  • - And how are you all supporting those parents

  • or supporting those students?

  • - Yeah, a lot of it is, retooling our clinical services

  • to be digital at this time.

  • So in many ways we're starting from a kind of population

  • focused prevention level, in that Child Mind Institute

  • now has two Facebook lives per day.

  • I did a section on the website, which you can see here

  • on Coronavirus support and resources

  • just for supporting families and includes

  • links to our daily tips and Facebook lives.

  • A link to phone consultations that we can provide right now

  • for families that are having difficulty.

  • And then also articles that are really focused

  • on coping with Coronavirus crisis.

  • We've tried to make those articles targeted to age groups,

  • to parents stress management, incorporation of mindfulness,

  • and then specific diagnostic clusters

  • where parents may be experiencing

  • a certain kind of unique difficulties,

  • say for kids on the autism spectrum

  • or kids who might have difficulty with behavior.

  • So I thank you for scrolling through that section

  • of our website right there.

  • You can also, I'll be doing these Facebook lives

  • twice next week, so if folks have questions

  • that go unanswered between you and me, Sal,

  • they can catch me again a little bit later.

  • - No, this is super useful.

  • And then we're getting a lot of interesting questions

  • here for you Dave.

  • This first one is from YouTube.

  • Molly Franklin asks, as an extrovert,

  • how can I keep from losing my mind during quarantine?

  • Exclamation mark.

  • - That's a really good question.

  • I mean, you know, I think that in many ways

  • we've seen an explosion of these kinds of self categorizing

  • terms on Twitter and on the internet right now,

  • where folks realize like in terms of the definition

  • of extrovert, we see it operationalized right now

  • and on the internet as somebody who really gets their energy

  • and really feels like their mood gets a boost

  • in any given day, from the contact, the close contact

  • in person that they have with other people,

  • that's where they get their energy.

  • And so look, what we try to do at first

  • is help extroverts to, cope in a sort of accepting way,

  • in that, we know that it's not gonna be the best

  • in terms of how to support their mental health right now.

  • We know that a lot of the ways

  • that they would normally draw energy

  • or get a mood boost are not available to them.

  • So it's about thinking as creatively as possible.

  • We try to assess with people,

  • what the level of relationship is with anybody

  • they might currently be socially distancing with,

  • how they can make the most

  • of those safe in-person connections.

  • And then similarly how they can connect with others

  • to just do daily activities kind of together,

  • in the sense that can you watch a TV show together?

  • Are there online games you can connect with

  • and play with other people?

  • And I'll give one last, quite creative suggestion

  • I've seen from some of the teenagers I treat,

  • which is social distancing walks,

  • in a sense that they'll meet up across a block

  • from each other, never be on the same side of the street,

  • but at least feel like they're walking together

  • and can look at each other, you know, in person.

  • - That's fascinating cause I think the rational part

  • of our brain says, why does it matter

  • if we're watching that, you know

  • that Netflix show at the same time.

  • But to your point there is something

  • deep inside of us that says,

  • Oh, other people are experiencing it at the same time.

  • - And that's the thing, I'm deep into cheer right now.

  • Next up is Tiger King.

  • But I think for all of us, it's that,

  • you know, if we don't have a partner

  • or another family member to watch with,

  • it becomes a question of can we watch with a friend

  • or, you know, do this over some sort of online forum

  • where somebody is on FaceTime at the same time

  • as we're watching on television

  • and we're watching in real time together.

  • It at least gives some sense of shared experience,

  • particularly for extroverts really feed off that.

  • We even see people - And that's some of the logic

  • - Cook the same food together.

  • Sorry, yeah.

  • - Oh, that's cool.

  • Cook the same food and then share a meal

  • that's a neat idea.

  • - Exactly, and you get to compare, you know,