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  • Hello, lovely people,

  • and welcome.

  • I can't believe we kind of almost made it.

  • [Sighs]

  • You can find the other videos in this series linked in the description down below.

  • Since we are now almost at the end of our festive time together,

  • and soon regular programming will resume on the channel,

  • I wanted to take this chance

  • to tell you about some of the other ways Christmas is celebrated around the world.

  • Since so many of you did seem to enjoy the weird British Christmas traditions video.

  • If you enjoy entertaining, educational content or staring at the 5000 shades of red lipstick I own,

  • and you aren't already subscribed, then please click or tap the red button below.

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  • This video is inspired by Clara,

  • my best friend and carer, who is Spanish,

  • and thus celebrates Kings' Night; a tradition all but forgotten in England.

  • Clara is going to explain little about Kings' Night and how it's celebrated in her country

  • before I tell you about other interesting ways Christmas is celebrated around the world.

  • I didn't give her any prior warning of thissorry.

  • Clara: Well, hello.

  • Clara: Spanish person

  • right here, explaining her traditions.

  • Clara: When I was a child, Christmas didn't used to be the big day

  • because our big day in Spain is actually January the 6th,

  • which is the day where the three kings, or wise men

  • (we call them kings - los tres reyes magicos -

  • "the three magic kings")

  • That's traditionally when the three kings would bring the presents to baby Jesus.

  • So that's when we would get our presents.

  • Christmas used to be - yes,

  • a day when you meet your family and friends and you get together

  • and all of that, and Christmas Eve -

  • but it was never really a present thing.

  • I don't know if other people in Spain - in the comments - actually got their presents then,

  • but I always got all my presents either

  • the night of the 5th,

  • which is Kings'…

  • Kings' Day Eve,

  • or then on the 6th, which is Kings' Day.

  • Pretty much like Christmas.

  • You meet your relatives and...

  • you have a lot of food.

  • My parents love to host it.

  • It's a day of whimsy and magic for the children

  • and just like you would leave cookies and milk for Santa,

  • you would leave food for the camels.

  • 'Cause, yes, the three wise men

  • - or the three kings - came by camel.

  • Yeah, that's basically it.

  • Clara: By the way, I forgot to mention, we also eat this traditional dessert; it's called...

  • Clara: It's this pastry that looks like a massive doughnut

  • and inside, it has two things:

  • one is a little figurine

  • and if you get it on your piece, you are the king and you get the crown;

  • and if you get black bean,

  • you lose and you have to pay for it the year after.

  • Christmas has become now the official day for presents, I would say,

  • but I think it's because of, you know, cultures getting together and movies and all of that.

  • Christmas just gets like earlier and earlier

  • every year.

  • Some kids are lucky and get presents both times.

  • Me and my family now exchange presents both days.

  • And yes, it's obviously a Catholic thing

  • as Jessica explained before.

  • The 6th of JanuaryKings' Nightis also known by the Epiphany, Denha, or Little Christmas.

  • Epiphany is a Christian feast day that celebrates the revelation of God as Jesus Christ.

  • In Western Christianity,

  • the feast commemorates principally the visit of the Magi, or three kings

  • as you'll know them if you ever did a nativity play in school,

  • to baby Jesus and thus physical manifestation to the Gentiles

  • (which means non-Jews).

  • Denha is celebrated by Syrian Christians, who are an Eastern branch of Christianity

  • found in present day Lebanon, Palestine, Israel,

  • Syria, Turkey, Iraq,

  • and Iran.

  • Large area.

  • Of course, it is worth noting that since Christianity began in the Middle East

  • in Jerusalem among Aramaic-speaking

  • Jews and then spread to other Aramaic-speaking

  • Semitic peoples along the Mediterranean coast

  • and also the inland parts the Roman Empire

  • and beyond that into the Parthenon Empire and to the later

  • Thasian Empire, including Mesopotamia,

  • but it's not reallyEastern

  • so much that it is the epicentre and everything else is east

  • or west.

  • On the other hand, Little Christmas (also known as Old Christmas

  • and Women's Christmas)

  • is a traditional celebration amongst Irish Christians and Amish Christians.

  • Again, for the 6th of January.

  • Among some Anabaptists, such as the Amish, Old Christmas is celebrated as the Julian calendar

  • (remember those calendars from episode one?)

  • and was retained for liturgical feasts.

  • Interestingly, in the fourth century, the churches of the Eastern Roman Empire

  • were celebrating Christmas on the 6th of January

  • and those in the Western Roman Empire were celebrating on the 25th of December,

  • and thus the time between those two dates came to be known as the twelve days of Christmas, because

  • Calendars: confusing.

  • In the Scottish Highlands, the term 'Lttle Christmas' is applied to New Year's Day

  • also known as [attempts pronunciation]

  • [Continues attempting pronunciation]

  • I mean, I'm deaf, so...

  • excuses all over.

  • Epiphany is also known as

  • another word I can't pronounce

  • Er, the Feast Day of Kings.

  • However, the Transalpine Redemptorists,

  • a part of the Catholic Church of Aberdeen and who are based

  • (it's really tiny)

  • on the Orkney Island of Papa Stronsay,

  • celebrate Little Christmas on the 25th day of every single month

  • except for December,

  • where the twenty-fifth day is celebrated as Christmas Day.

  • Think on that.

  • A Christmas

  • every month.

  • In even more out-there customs,

  • we have the Giant Lantern Festival of the Philippines

  • which is held each year on the Saturday before Christmas Eve

  • in the city of San Fernando,

  • the Christmas capital of the Philippines.

  • So, eleven different villages take part in the festival

  • and the competition is so fierce that everyone helps in the whole village in trying to build the most elaborate lantern.

  • Originally, these were really simple creations; they were about half a metre in diameter,

  • made from a type of Japanese origami paper.

  • And lit by a candle.

  • Kind of similar to the lanterns that I showed you in the

  • video that I made about

  • candles; I'm gonna say that was day nine.

  • In the Brighton Festival, Burning of the Clocks.

  • Today, however,

  • the lanterns are made from a variety of materials and have grown to around

  • six metres in size!

  • They're illuminated by electric bulbs

  • and have kaleidoscopic patterns and colours.

  • Slightly more traditional in the snowy Christmas sense,

  • we have Sweden's Gävle Goat.

  • Stop trying to pronounce things, Jessica.

  • Which, since 1966,

  • they've erected a 13-metre-tall Yule goat

  • in the centre ofvle's Castle Square

  • for the whole Advent.

  • But, the real tradition is actually people trying to burn it down.

  • Since 1966, the goat has actually been successfully burnt down twenty-nine times;

  • the most recent disruption was in 2016.

  • All in good fun, though.

  • Much like the apparentlyfun,” yet actually terrifying,

  • Krampus in Austria.

  • He's a beast-like demon creature that roams city streets

  • frightening children and punishing the bad ones.

  • In Austrian traditions, St. Nicholas rewards nice little children,

  • while Krampus is said to capture

  • the naughtiest children

  • and whisk them away in his sack.

  • In the first week of December, young men dress up as Krampus

  • [disturbed shudder]

  • and frighten children with clattering chains and bells.

  • Related to Krampus, we have the Yule Lads

  • (which is a name I love)

  • in Iceland.

  • They're thirteen tricksy troll-like characters

  • and they come out to play in the thirteen days leading up to Christmas.

  • So, for each night of Yuletide,

  • children place their best shoes by the window

  • and a different 'Yule Lad' visits

  • ('Yule Lad' - I can't get over it),

  • leaving gifts

  • for very good children

  • and rotting potatoes

  • for the bad ones.

  • ...Oh.

  • Clad in traditional Icelandic costume,

  • these chaps arepretty mischievous .

  • OK, yeah. So that's pretty ancient, I suppose.

  • But! Japan take the biscuit when it comes to modern times,

  • with their traditional

  • Kentucky Fried Christmas dinner.

  • Christmas has never really been a big deal in Japan; aside from a few small secular traditions, such as

  • gift-giving and

  • lighting displays, Christmas largely remains a novelty.

  • However,

  • they have a new quirky tradition:

  • a Christmas Day feast

  • ...of Kentucky Fried Chicken.

  • From which we move to a tradition that dates back centuries:

  • the hiding of brooms on Christmas Eve in Norway.

  • People apparently believed that witches and evil spirits came out on Christmas Eve

  • looking for brooms to ride on.

  • So, to this day, many people still hide their brooms in a safe place in the house to stop them from being stolen.

  • Well, I suppose if you make it into a tradition, then yeah, people are probably gonna...

  • just want some brooms.

  • And, even more traditional:

  • is St. Nicholas Day in Germany.

  • Not to be confused with Father Christmas,

  • Nicholas travels by donkey in the middle of the night on December the 6th.

  • Saint Nicholas also visits children in schools

  • or at home, and in exchange for sweets or small present

  • a child must recite a poem,

  • sing a song, or draw a picture.

  • To beactually, waitYeah.

  • No, one of the traditions in my Swedish family is that

  • on Christmas Eve you must perform in order to be given your dinner.

  • Well, pudding. You're not allowed pudding. Which is always rice pudding.

  • You're not allowed rice pudding

  • until you have performed.

  • We don't have shy people in our family, clearly.

  • But it isn't always fun and games.

  • St. Nicholas often brings along Farmhand Rupert.

  • A devil-like character dressed in dark clothes covered in bells with a dirty beard,

  • Farmhand Rupert carries a stick or a small whip

  • in hand to punish any children who misbehave.

  • Children get punished a lot, actually.

  • Is Christmas really just a way to make children be good

  • by threatening them with pain?

  • Oh, and sliding in at the end,

  • we have the truly fabulous Venezuela;

  • where, for reasons utterly unknown,

  • every Christmas Eve the city's residents head to church in the morning on roller-skates.

  • A unique tradition.

  • but it's so popular that the roads across the city are closed to cars

  • so that people can skate to church in safety.

  • No one knows where that tradition's come from;

  • it's just really cool.

  • Are you from one of these countries?

  • How do you celebrate Christmas?

  • Is it a little off the wall?

  • Please let me know in the comments down below.

  • I have loved learning about all of these.

  • [Gentle, jolly festive music]

Hello, lovely people,

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B1 中級

世界のクリスマスの伝統トップ10 // Christmastideの日10 (Top 10 Christmas Traditions Around the World // Christmastide Day 10)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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