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  • - Hello.

  • Welcome to the Daily Homeroom Sal Khan here

  • from Khan Academy for those of you.

  • For those of you that this is the first time you're joining

  • this is something that we're doing on a daily basis,

  • so that we all feel connected

  • in this time of school closures and social distancing.

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  • a teacher to ask questions.

  • So, whatever social media platform you're watching this on,

  • start asking questions on the messages below.

  • We have team members who are surfacing some

  • of those questions up to me and our guests,

  • so that we can answer them for you.

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  • to structure your days in different ways.

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  • It all makes a difference.

  • So, today we have a very exciting guest we,

  • yesterday we talked about mental health

  • and today we're gonna talk a little bit

  • about physical health.

  • And I think we all have a sense, you know,

  • we have those daily schedules where we said,

  • "hey this is where you can work on math on Khan Academy,

  • "this, we could work on English language arts,"

  • but we had breaks in there

  • and we kinda threw in, "hey, you could do yoga now,

  • "you could go for a run," but today we have an expert,

  • Michelle Carter from Shape America.

  • So, Michelle before the COVID crisis.

  • What were you doing or what are you doing?

  • (laughing)

  • - Well that's a great question.

  • I think we've all been kinda sidetracked

  • with this COVID-19, but Shape America is a,

  • Shape America is a nonprofit association for health

  • and PE teachers, we serve as the voice of--

  • - [Sal] Is it, I can't...

  • Maybe, check with Philippe.

  • Are y'all hearing Michelle?

  • 'Cause I can't hear.

  • Oh, okay, so Philippe hears her,

  • so maybe something's wrong with my.

  • (speaking faintly)

  • - Okay, I'm here, I just.

  • Can you hear me now?

  • - [Sal] Hear you.

  • - Can you hear me now?

  • Okay.

  • So, as I was saying the Shape America serves

  • as the voice of over 200,000 health and PE teachers

  • and so, we're dedicated to helping health education teachers

  • and physical education teachers with what they need

  • to teach students how to live their best life physically

  • and emotionally so I'm a former health and PE teacher

  • and so I really serve as a subject matter

  • and content expert for Shape America.

  • Okay so, one of the things that's really important

  • when you are thinking

  • about creating physical activity experiences

  • for your children, are that you want

  • to accumulate about 60 minutes of daily physical activity

  • for school aged children around ages six to 17 years old

  • and this is recommendations that come from CDC

  • and for preschool aged children,

  • thinking about three to five years old,

  • there isn't a set time, but just making sure

  • that there's getting physical activity throughout the day.

  • So, some specific examples of the kinds of things

  • that you can do with your younger children

  • are using things around your house.

  • It doesn't have to be elaborate, doesn't have

  • to even take a lot of time as long as you're just providing

  • that opportunity for your children to move and one example

  • is using things like paper plates or if you have pillows

  • or even a hand towel something flat and you can spread

  • that around an area and have them jump from rock to rock.

  • And so this works on the skills of balance and local motor

  • and leaping and then if you're able to go outside,

  • you could use sidewalk chalk

  • and draw circles and have them leaping.

  • Really, at the early childhood age

  • around three to five, imaginative movement

  • is really good for young children.

  • Having them move their bodies in different ways,

  • so asking them, "can you make your body like a circle,

  • "can you make your body like a triangle or the letter S?"

  • And so getting them to be creative

  • while they're moving their body

  • and exploring how their body moves in different ways.

  • I know we probably, the go to exercise of movement

  • is walking, and it's really good even for little ones

  • but specifically for little ones having

  • to practice those local motor movements again

  • as well as galloping and skipping and hopping,

  • they can do that along the sidewalk.

  • So, just thinking about ways

  • that they can move while walking.

  • In your house or even outside you

  • can ask them, "touch three things that are green,

  • "touch one thing that is red," so just having them,

  • you're working on colors and then following directions

  • and they're moving at the same time, so very simple things

  • and then of course, one that is easy to do, is with music

  • and using music as a great tool.

  • So, playing different types of music with fast tempos

  • or slower tempos and asking them,

  • "well how can you move your body to the beat of this song?"

  • So, if they're moving fast, they can get kind of upbeat

  • or if they're slow,

  • and they move their body slow, classical music

  • is a great opportunity to use

  • because the variations in the tempo

  • or if there's loud drums or clashing symbols.

  • And so, we have a lot of resources at shapeamerica.org,

  • especially on our early childhood calendars

  • are really great.

  • We have tons of resources there with plethora of ideas

  • for our little, our young friends, our young children.

  • So, specifically going back to school aged children,

  • that's categorized as six to 17 year old children.

  • And so, really making sure they get an hour of moderate

  • to vigorous physical activity throughout the day.

  • So, that means their heart rate is up,

  • they're breathing harder

  • and if they did it long enough, they get sweaty.

  • - Hi, Michelle - So it doesn't have.

  • Hi, hi!

  • - So, apologies, we have a little bit

  • of technical difficulties, so I'll be stepping

  • in until Sal gets set up with questions for Michelle.

  • - No problem.

  • - Yeah, so I think we have a couple of good questions

  • that are already coming in.

  • - All right, awesome.

  • - We have a really good question

  • from Facebook Michelle, it's from Scott Yang.

  • And the question is, "Michelle What do you,

  • "what if you live in a tiny home?"

  • How do you exercise inside a tiny space?

  • - Absolutely.

  • So, you don't need a lot of space necessarily

  • but this is where creativity comes

  • in really great, so one thing that, using the things

  • that you already have in your house.

  • So, one example is if you have Candyland

  • or another card game or Monopoly

  • or something like that you can use the cards from that game,

  • and assign exercises to the colors

  • or the suits or the character.

  • And then, so for example, in Candyland

  • if you draw a blue color, you can do running

  • in place for 20 seconds or something like that.

  • And one thing you'll hear me talk

  • about a lot through this is allowing your children

  • to have choice, that's really important

  • so, ask them, "what do you want,

  • "what should we do if we pick blue?"

  • "What should we do if we pick red?"

  • So, getting them involved

  • and coming up with the rules of the game.

  • Hi Sal.

  • - Hey, Michelle!

  • I could finally hear you,

  • so apologies everyone. - Good good.

  • - But Philippe did some heroic back end rewiring

  • of everything it looks like we're all good

  • and thanks Dan for being able to step in and Dan's always

  • in the background helping us

  • so, I should always be thanking him,

  • and it sounds like you already got started

  • and I think I got a sense of where y'all are.

  • I guess, maybe one way to think about it is, what is,

  • maybe you just said this so I'm late to this party.

  • What is a target amount of physical activity

  • that you would like children to be getting,

  • maybe of different agents.

  • - Yes, so, for that school age group.

  • Six to 17 years old, they're about an hour of 60 minutes

  • of physical activity

  • and so we're saying moderate to vigorous.

  • So, they're breathing harder heart rate is up

  • and if they were to do this activity long enough, you know,

  • they'd start working up a sweat for younger children

  • that's preschool age, there isn't necessarily a set time,

  • but just providing opportunities for physical activity

  • and movement and imaginative movement throughout the day,

  • so that they can explore how their body moves.

  • - Yeah, and for those younger crowd it's almost hard

  • to stop them from moving.

  • So they (laughing)

  • - Yeah their bodies, our bodies.

  • Yeah.

  • - I once, for kicks, put a step tracker on my five year old

  • and saw what happened and he has a lot of steps in his day.

  • But that's interesting. - Oh, I'm down with it.

  • - It's kind of a little more rigorous, a walk is nice

  • but if you can maybe work up a sweat, dancing, yoga,

  • running, some type of, you know, shooting hoops,

  • you know, socially distance just with your family,

  • I guess, stuff like that.

  • - Yeah so, walking is a great is a great exercise

  • and you can make walking, more intense too

  • by speeding up your pace, or looking to go up hills,

  • even adding in skipping and things like that

  • to make it a little bit more challenging.

  • So, walking is, I know it's kind of a go to thing

  • 'cause it's easy to do

  • and it is very effective, so walking is great.

  • You can even throw in other things

  • with other movements like lunges or squats

  • and things like that just to ramp it up a little bit, too.

  • - What do you think about pacing is it an hour all at once,

  • or do you imagine it being three, 20 minute sessions

  • over the course of the day?

  • So, I think breaking it up is the best.

  • We kind of