Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • I'm a storyteller.

    翻訳: Takako Sato 校正: Masahiro Kyushima

  • And I would like to tell you a few personal stories

    私は作家です

  • about what I like to call "the danger of the single story."

    “シングルストーリーの危険性” と呼んでいる―

  • I grew up on a university campus in eastern Nigeria.

    個人的なお話をいくつかしたいと思います

  • My mother says that I started reading at the age of two,

    私は東ナイジェリアの大学キャンパスで育ちました

  • although I think four is probably close to the truth.

    私が2歳から本を読みだしたと 母は言うけれど

  • So I was an early reader, and what I read

    実際は4歳が正しいでしょう

  • were British and American children's books.

    そんな私が読んでいたのは

  • I was also an early writer,

    イギリスやアメリカの子どもの本です

  • and when I began to write, at about the age of seven,

    文筆に親しみ始めたのも早く

  • stories in pencil with crayon illustrations

    7才頃にはクレヨンの絵付きで

  • that my poor mother was obligated to read,

    物語を書き始め

  • I wrote exactly the kinds of stories I was reading:

    母に読ませたものでした

  • All my characters were white and blue-eyed,

    私が書くのは まさに私が読んでいたような話です

  • they played in the snow,

    登場人物はみな青い目をした白人

  • they ate apples,

    雪遊びをして

  • and they talked a lot about the weather,

    リンゴを食べました

  • how lovely it was

    (笑)

  • that the sun had come out.

    そしてよくするのは天気の話

  • (Laughter)

    太陽が顔を出してよかったね と

  • Now, this despite the fact that I lived in Nigeria.

    (笑)

  • I had never been outside Nigeria.

    実際は太陽がギラギラしてましたけどね

  • We didn't have snow, we ate mangoes,

    当時 私は外国へ行ったことがありませんでした

  • and we never talked about the weather,

    雪は降らないし 食べていたのはマンゴ

  • because there was no need to.

    太陽が照っているので天気が

  • My characters also drank a lot of ginger beer

    話題になったこともありません

  • because the characters in the British books I read

    私の本の登場人物はジンジャービールもよく飲みました

  • drank ginger beer.

    それがどんな飲み物か知らなかったけれど

  • Never mind that I had no idea what ginger beer was.

    私が読んだイギリスの本の

  • (Laughter)

    登場人物が飲んでいたからです

  • And for many years afterwards, I would have a desperate desire

    (笑)

  • to taste ginger beer.

    その後何年もジンジャービールを

  • But that is another story.

    無性に飲んでみたかった

  • What this demonstrates, I think,

    でも その話はまた今度

  • is how impressionable and vulnerable we are

    これは物語に対する

  • in the face of a story,

    我々や 特に子どもの感受性の強さと

  • particularly as children.

    影響を受けやすさを

  • Because all I had read were books

    立証していると思います

  • in which characters were foreign,

    私が読んだことのある本はどれも

  • I had become convinced that books

    登場人物が外国人だったので

  • by their very nature had to have foreigners in them

    本とは本来 登場人物が外国人で

  • and had to be about things with which

    私が感情移入することのできない―

  • I could not personally identify.

    内容でなければならないと

  • Things changed when I discovered African books.

    思い込んでいたのです

  • There weren't many of them available, and they weren't

    アフリカの本を読んで 考え方が変わりました

  • quite as easy to find as the foreign books.

    あまりアフリカの本は出版されておらず

  • But because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye

    洋書ほど簡単に手に入りませんでした

  • I went through a mental shift in my perception

    チヌワ アチェベやカマラ ライのような作家が

  • of literature.

    私の文学に対する

  • I realized that people like me,

    見方を変えたのです

  • girls with skin the color of chocolate,

    私のようにチョコレート色の肌をして

  • whose kinky hair could not form ponytails,

    ポニーテールが出来ない―

  • could also exist in literature.

    縮れ髪の少女も

  • I started to write about things I recognized.

    登場人物になれるのです

  • Now, I loved those American and British books I read.

    私は自分が気づいた事を書き始めました

  • They stirred my imagination. They opened up new worlds for me.

    私の想像力をかきたて 新しい世界を切り開いた―

  • But the unintended consequence

    米国や英国の本は大好きでしたが

  • was that I did not know that people like me

    文学には私のような人間も

  • could exist in literature.

    登場するんだと 知らなかったのは

  • So what the discovery of African writers did for me was this:

    意図せざる結果でした

  • It saved me from having a single story

    アフリカ人作家を知ったことで

  • of what books are.

    本とは何であるかという―

  • I come from a conventional, middle-class Nigerian family.

    シングルストーリーから救われました

  • My father was a professor.

    私は普通のナイジェリアの中流階級出身です

  • My mother was an administrator.

    父は大学教授で 母は

  • And so we had, as was the norm,

    会社の理事をしていました

  • live-in domestic help, who would often come from nearby rural villages.

    ですから 我が家には 普通に

  • So the year I turned eight we got a new house boy.

    たいてい近くの村から来る 住み込みのお手伝いがいました

  • His name was Fide.

    私が8歳になった年 新しい少年を雇いました

  • The only thing my mother told us about him

    彼の名はフィデといい

  • was that his family was very poor.

    母が彼について唯一教えてくれたのは

  • My mother sent yams and rice,

    彼の家はとても貧しいということ

  • and our old clothes, to his family.

    母は彼の家にヤム芋や米や

  • And when I didn't finish my dinner my mother would say,

    私たちの古着を送っていました

  • "Finish your food! Don't you know? People like Fide's family have nothing."

    ご飯を残すと母は言ったものです

  • So I felt enormous pity for Fide's family.

    “全部 食べなさい フィデの家族のような人は何もないのよ”

  • Then one Saturday we went to his village to visit,

    フィデの家族を気の毒に感じました

  • and his mother showed us a beautifully patterned basket

    ある土曜日のこと 彼の村を訪ねたのです

  • made of dyed raffia that his brother had made.

    フィデの兄が編んだヤシの葉の素敵なバスケットを

  • I was startled.

    彼のお母さんが見せてくれて

  • It had not occurred to me that anybody in his family

    私は驚きました

  • could actually make something.

    彼の家族が何かを作れるなんて

  • All I had heard about them was how poor they were,

    思いもしなかったのです

  • so that it had become impossible for me to see them

    貧乏だとしか聞いてなかったので

  • as anything else but poor.

    それ以外のことと彼らを結びつけるのが

  • Their poverty was my single story of them.

    私にはできなかったのです

  • Years later, I thought about this when I left Nigeria

    貧困は私が抱く彼らのシングルストーリーでした

  • to go to university in the United States.

    何年もして私がアメリカの大学進学に

  • I was 19.

    国を離れた際 この事を考えることになったのです

  • My American roommate was shocked by me.

    私は19歳でした

  • She asked where I had learned to speak English so well,

    アメリカ人のルームメイトは驚いて

  • and was confused when I said that Nigeria

    私がどこで英語を身につけたのか尋ね

  • happened to have English as its official language.

    ナイジェリアの公用語は

  • She asked if she could listen to what she called my "tribal music,"

    英語だと言うと困惑していました

  • and was consequently very disappointed

    彼女は私の“部族音楽” を聴きたがって

  • when I produced my tape of Mariah Carey.

    私がマライアキャリーのテープを見せると

  • (Laughter)

    がっかりしていました

  • She assumed that I did not know how

    (笑)

  • to use a stove.

    彼女は私がコンロの使い方を

  • What struck me was this: She had felt sorry for me

    知らないだろうと決め込んでいました

  • even before she saw me.

    顔を合わせる前から私に同情していたと

  • Her default position toward me, as an African,

    いうのには面を食らいました

  • was a kind of patronizing, well-meaning pity.

    アフリカ人である私に対する彼女の

  • My roommate had a single story of Africa:

    標準的見解は憐みだったのです

  • a single story of catastrophe.

    彼女が抱くアフリカのシングルストーリーは

  • In this single story there was no possibility

    アフリカの悲劇でした

  • of Africans being similar to her in any way,

    そのシングルストーリーでは

  • no possibility of feelings more complex than pity,

    アフリカ人が彼女のようになれる訳もなく

  • no possibility of a connection as human equals.

    憐みより複雑な感情はなく

  • I must say that before I went to the U.S. I didn't

    人間として対等に見られていませんでした

  • consciously identify as African.

    私はアメリカへ行くまで

  • But in the U.S. whenever Africa came up people turned to me.

    アフリカ人という意識はなかったのです

  • Never mind that I knew nothing about places like Namibia.

    私がナミビアのような場所を知らないにも関わらず

  • But I did come to embrace this new identity,

    アメリカでアフリカと言えば 私に注意が向けられました

  • and in many ways I think of myself now as African.

    でも この新しい自我を受け入れるようになり

  • Although I still get quite irritable when

    今は様々な点で自分がアフリカ人だと思っています

  • Africa is referred to as a country,

    アフリカが国だとみなされるのは

  • the most recent example being my otherwise wonderful flight

    未だに頭に来ますけど…

  • from Lagos two days ago, in which

    2日前に乗ったラゴス発のヴァージン航空は

  • there was an announcement on the Virgin flight

    快適でしたが チャリティーに

  • about the charity work in "India, Africa and other countries."

    関する機内放送があり

  • (Laughter)

    “インド アフリカ その他の国々” と言っていました

  • So after I had spent some years in the U.S. as an African,

    (笑)

  • I began to understand my roommate's response to me.

    アフリカ人としてアメリカで暮らしてみて

  • If I had not grown up in Nigeria, and if all I knew about Africa

    ルームメイトの反応がわかるようになりました

  • were from popular images,

    もしも 私がナイジェリア出身ではなく

  • I too would think that Africa was a place of

    アフリカの知識をイメージから得ていたら

  • beautiful landscapes, beautiful animals,

    私が持つ印象も 綺麗な景色や

  • and incomprehensible people,

    動物 そして無意味な戦争をする―

  • fighting senseless wars, dying of poverty and AIDS,

    理解できない人たち

  • unable to speak for themselves

    貧困とエイズで死んでいき

  • and waiting to be saved

    人々は意見も言えずに

  • by a kind, white foreigner.

    親切な白人の救いの手を

  • I would see Africans in the same way that I,

    待っている と思っていたでしょう

  • as a child, had seen Fide's family.

    子どもの頃 フィデの家族を

  • This single story of Africa ultimately comes, I think, from Western literature.

    見ていたように アフリカ人を見ていたことでしょう

  • Now, here is a quote from

    アフリカのシングルストーリーは結局のところ西洋文学から来ていると思います

  • the writing of a London merchant called John Locke,

    1561年に西アフリカに航海して

  • who sailed to west Africa in 1561

    興味深い旅の記述を残した

  • and kept a fascinating account of his voyage.

    ロンドン貿易商のジョン ロックの

  • After referring to the black Africans

    文章からの引用です

  • as "beasts who have no houses,"

    黒人のアフリカ人を

  • he writes, "They are also people without heads,

    “家なき野獣” とした後に

  • having their mouth and eyes in their breasts."

    “彼らは頭がなくて 胸の中に

  • Now, I've laughed every time I've read this.

    口と目がある人間である” と書いています

  • And one must admire the imagination of John Locke.

    これを読むたびに笑ってしまいます

  • But what is important about his writing is that

    ジョンロックの想像力には脱帽です

  • it represents the beginning

    要は 彼の文章は

  • of a tradition of telling African stories in the West:

    西洋で語られる

  • A tradition of Sub-Saharan Africa as a place of negatives,

    アフリカ伝承の発端を表しているのです

  • of difference, of darkness,

    報われぬ暗い場所のサブ サハラ アフリカ

  • of people who, in the words of the wonderful poet

    素晴らしい詩人―

  • Rudyard Kipling,

    ラドヤード キップリングの言葉で言い現わすと

  • are "half devil, half child."

    “半分悪魔 半分子ども” の

  • And so I began to realize that my American roommate

    人々がいる場所です

  • must have throughout her life

    ルームメイトも生まれてからずっと

  • seen and heard different versions

    このシングルストーリーの

  • of this single story,

    違ったバージョンを見聞きしたに

  • as had a professor,

    違いないと気づき始めました

  • who once told me that my novel was not "authentically African."

    私の小説を “真のアフリカ” ではないと

  • Now, I was quite willing to contend that there were a number of things

    言った教授もそうだったに違いないでしょう

  • wrong with the novel,

    私の小説の中には誤りや

  • that it had failed in a number of places,

    未熟な部分が多いのは

  • but I had not quite imagined that it had failed

    私も認めますが

  • at achieving something called African authenticity.

    真のアフリカと呼ばれるものに

  • In fact I did not know what

    見合わないとは想像もしませんでした

  • African authenticity was.

    真のアフリカとは何を指すのか―

  • The professor told me that my characters

    私は知りもしませんでした

  • were too much like him,

    教授に 私が書く人物は

  • an educated and middle-class man.

    彼のような学がある中流階級の

  • My characters drove cars.

    男だと言われました

  • They were not starving.

    車を運転して

  • Therefore they were not authentically African.

    飢えに苦しんでいなかったゆえに

  • But I must quickly add that I too am just as guilty

    "真のアフリカ" ではなかったのです

  • in the question of the single story.

    でも 私もシングルストーリーに

  • A few years ago, I visited Mexico from the U.S.

    身に覚えがないとは言えません

  • The political climate in the U.S. at the time was tense,

    数年前 アメリカからメキシコに行きました

  • and there were debates going on about immigration.

    当時 アメリカの政治風土は張り詰めており

  • And, as often happens in America,

    移民に関する議論がなされていたのです

  • immigration became synonymous with Mexicans.

    アメリカではよく見られるように

  • There were endless stories of Mexicans

    移民はメキシコ人の類義語となりました

  • as people who were

    メキシコ人が

  • fleecing the healthcare system,

    保健医療制度を悪用したり

  • sneaking across the border,

    こっそり国境越えをしたり

  • being arrested at the border, that sort of thing.

    国境で逮捕される人たちだという―

  • I remember walking around on my first day in Guadalajara,

    話には切りがありませんでした

  • watching the people going to work,

    グアダラハラで過ごした初日に

  • rolling up tortillas in the marketplace,

    通勤する人たちを眺め

  • smoking, laughing.

    トルティーヤを食べ タバコを吸って

  • I remember first feeling slight surprise.

    楽しい時間を過ごしました

  • And then I was overwhelmed with shame.

    最初に少し驚いた記憶があり

  • I realized that I had been so immersed

    そして恥ずかしさで打ちのめされました

  • in the media coverage of Mexicans

    報道されるメキシコ人に

  • that they had become one thing in my mind,

    どっぷりと浸かっていた自分は

  • the abject immigrant.

    彼らをみじめな移民としか

  • I had bought into the single story of Mexicans

    思っていなかったことに気がついたのです

  • and I could not have been more ashamed of myself.

    彼らのシングルストーリーを受け入れていた―

  • So that is how to create a single story,

    自分が恥ずかしくてたまりませんでした

  • show a people as one thing,

    このようにシングルストーリーは

  • as only one thing,

    作りだされるのです

  • over and over again,

    唯一のものとして

  • and that is what they become.

    繰り返し人に見せられ

  • It is impossible to talk about the single story

    作られていくのです

  • without talking about power.

    影響力を語らずにシングルストーリーを

  • There is a word, an Igbo word,

    語ることはできません

  • that I think about whenever I think about

    世界の権力構造を考える時に

  • the power structures of the world, and it is "nkali."

    いつも思い出す “ンカリ” という

  • It's a noun that loosely translates

    イボの言葉があります

  • to "to be greater than another."

    “他よりも偉大であること” と

  • Like our economic and political worlds,

    意訳できる名詞です

  • stories too are defined

    経済や政治の世界のように

  • by the principle of nkali:

    物語もンカリの法則で

  • How they are told, who tells them,

    定義されます

  • when they're told, how many stories are told,

    どのように 誰が

  • are really dependent on power.

    いつ どれだけの話を語ったのか

  • Power is the ability not just to tell the story of another person,

    それは影響力に左右されます

  • but to make it the definitive story of that person.

    影響力とはある人の話を語るだけではなく

  • The Palestinian poet Mourid Barghouti writes

    その人の完全で正確な話を作る才能のことです

  • that if you want to dispossess a people,

    パレスチナの詩人曰く

  • the simplest way to do it is to tell their story

    人々を追い出したければ

  • and to start with, "secondly."

    一番簡単なのは “第二に” から始まる―

  • Start the story with the arrows of the Native Americans,

    彼らの話をすることです

  • and not with the arrival of the British,

    物語の出だしを英国人の米国到達にせず

  • and you have an entirely different story.

    ネイティブアメリカンの矢にすると

  • Start the story with

    まったく違う話が出来上がります

  • the failure of the African state,

    物語の出だしをアフリカにおける

  • and not with the colonial creation of the African state,

    植民地の成立にせず

  • and you have an entirely different story.

    アフリカの問題点にすると

  • I recently spoke at a university where

    まったく違う話が出来上がります

  • a student told me that it was

    最近 大学で講演をした際

  • such a shame

    学生が言ったんです

  • that Nigerian men were physical abusers

    ナイジェリアの男は私の本に

  • like the father character in my novel.

    出てくる父親のように

  • I told him that I had just read a novel

    身体的虐待をして残念だ と

  • called American Psycho --

    私は「アメリカンサイコ」 を

  • (Laughter)

    最近読んだと彼に言い

  • -- and that it was such a shame

    (笑)

  • that young Americans were serial murderers.

    若いアメリカ人が

  • (Laughter)

    連続殺人犯で残念だと返しました

  • (Applause)

    (笑)

  • Now, obviously I said this in a fit of mild irritation.

    (拍手)

  • (Laughter)

    明らかに ちょっとした苛立ったもので

  • But it would never have occurred to me to think

    (笑)