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  • what we got.

  • This one's got me excited.

  • Where'd you get it?

  • I picked this up in an online auction.

  • The guy he's from Newport Beach, California He's been collecting for decades and his parents collection down and getting rid of some stuff right here We have a 19 thirties or forties box of Cracker Jack.

  • Let's do this crackerjack classic American snack and the toys like, Let's be honest, like that's what Cracker Jack was all about.

  • Yes, they couldn't care less if the kids ate the Cracker Jack.

  • They knew they were buying it for the toy for the prize.

  • Absolutely.

  • People think alike the prizes for years, and this was from when toys were really cool.

  • Oh, yeah, It'll be really cool to find out what prize would get in this box.

  • It's also an iconic look, a little boy on here, sailor Jack.

  • This was actually modeled after a real kid, and it's kind of a little bit of a tragic story.

  • Yeah, basically, they put the young boy on it.

  • His name was Robert.

  • He was the son of the eldest duck.

  • I'm brother Edward.

  • And then that same year he dies of pneumonia at the age of eight.

  • Very young, very tragic.

  • What a way to keep a memory a lot, right?

  • He's still on every package crackerjack sold today.

  • While cardboard packaging is the norm today.

  • That was not the case in the 18 nineties.

  • One Cracker jacks first, so most snack foods were sold in bulk and came in metal tens or glass jars.

  • But company partner Henry Eckstine developed the triple proof packaging, which allowed for a large scale production of a snack food in single serving boxes, which would not swollen shipped nationwide.

  • Because of this, many believe Crackerjack became the first mass produced junk food in the country.

  • I don't think it would be as world renowned today, heading up in for two things.

  • One, The prize and two Take Me Out to the ballgame.

  • Cracker Jack has long been synonymous with baseball and especially the song Take Me Out to the Ballgame.

  • Oddly enough, the famous lyric buy Me some peanuts and Cracker Jack wasn't some clever marketing or branding scheme, but just something songwriter Jack nor worth included to rhyme with the line.

  • I don't care if I never get back, however, the impact of song hat on the snack was monumental.

  • And as the song climb the charts, sales for crackerjack skyrocketed.

  • If you got a game, definitely Crackerjacks won't come into your mind at least once.

  • Lethal at least once right through this box of Cracker Jack.

  • Packaging isn't perfect.

  • We see are real holes here.

  • And if phones can get in there, mold can get in there and we're not gonna eat mold.

  • But, you know, I think it's time we get this bad boy open, and I'm Wow, look at the difference on the just the color difference where it's been covered 80 90 years, huh?

  • What is that?

  • What is that?

  • Is this gonna be a date?

  • Kinda looks like an elder me.

  • 31 38.

  • So march 1st night, thinking it could be march 1st.

  • 1938.

  • I'm, like, so excited.

  • It's a little bit brittle.

  • Oh, I am.

  • We don't have us like a little toy.

  • We have a 1910 card of a Hudson.

  • What are you gonna do with that?

  • What are you gonna D'oh?

  • But for something that is, this old still looks pretty great.

  • I think this is awesome because this is a card from the 19 thirties.

  • Uh, what is that?

  • That looks like a piece of a bug.

  • This is a perfect bug Carcass.

  • Yeah, there's another one.

  • The bugs are way worse than I had anticipated, and they went to town, and they devoured this from peanuts to popcorn.

  • Now, listen, this isn't a deal breaker.

  • We've eaten bugs before.

  • I don't see any glaring mold staring back at us, And that means we can still eat this.

  • All right?

  • Ah, very, very beginning.

  • I don't even get the mustard nous.

  • I just get the sweetness like sweet molasses.

  • But it also has this sharp soundness on the back.

  • And it's rotten.

  • That must be chemical.

  • I just like the basement carpet after you ripped it out after, like, 30 years being down there.

  • They'll do?

  • Yeah.

  • Old cardboard.

  • Old Christmas box, old just attic.

  • I don't have the peanut.

  • That is horrible.

  • That Oh, God, that Oh, my God.

  • I can't even describe the taste.

  • Good.

  • Like really hurting my mouth.

  • What that has brought is really real.

  • Rod.

  • I think I'm seeing stars.

  • You could avoid all of that besides that peanut that basically attacked my mouth.

  • What we had here today was an unbelievably iconic experience.

  • This is like the heyday.

  • Oh, crackers.

  • Yet over 80 years later, we got to eat it.

  • This is completely edible.

  • And it was still sweet.

  • Like I'm not complaining at all.

  • I'm gonna take this card.

  • Let's go in my 1910 Hudson.

  • We're gonna hook that up.

  • Hey there.

  • What's going on?

  • Thanks for watching.

  • Make sure you subscribe to the channel right here for more eating history videos and more content with all your favorite history shows new upload every single day.

  • That's it for us.

  • We have more history to eat.

what we got.

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食べる歴史。極限の味覚テスト:50年以上前のクラッカージャックを食べる(シーズン1)|食の歴史 (Eating History: EXTREME TASTE TEST: Eating 50+ Year Old Cracker Jack (Season 1) | History)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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