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  • curiosity killed the cat Who's here have heard that saying, Basically everyone in the room this saying, Actually, it's a very old saying It can be traced back all the way to the 16th century.

  • That's a very long time.

  • I personally have a very I don't like that saying, because one it on their minds are natural capacity as humans to be able to think critically and the challenge assumptions.

  • And on the other hand, curiosity has seen something that has shaped my entire life all the way to what I did today as a behavioral engineer where I used curiosity to help people create technology that is inclusive.

  • So we want to think about having a world where there no biases.

  • There's no discrimination, at least from the melody Go side.

  • We need to start thinking about how we used curiosity because, you see, curiosity is not just a thing that makes you want to learn more.

  • It's not just your desire to have more knowledge.

  • It's actually incredible thing that has shaped us as humans are history all the way from starting from the great, the invention of fire to self driving cars or anything that comes after, and it all starts with one question.

  • So if you think about it, what why do we have to wait for pictures to be developed?

  • And so Polaroid was invented or just thinking about Why does the pot an apple fall from the tree?

  • And so we have gravity.

  • So these questions are the things that have determined are breakthroughs.

  • I'd innovations, and without it we wouldn't have them.

  • I find myself to be a very curious person.

  • I actually asked so many wives what ifs.

  • When I meet someone, I actively warned them that I will be asking them a lot of questions.

  • And I don't do this because I just want to be polite on Dhe.

  • I will stop asking questions actually do this, because I will ask the questions.

  • But I want to make them know that they'll feel uncomfortable because we do feel uncomfortable when someone's asked those questions.

  • Actually, that make us think critically.

  • And to be honest, it is a little fun.

  • So, um, the thing about curiosity that we sometimes something is that it works like we're receiving a gift.

  • So curiosity makes a reward system work, so we start releasing dopamine So it's almost like we're expecting this information, which is like, this gift that we're gonna be receiving on that release of dopamine in our brains feels so incredible.

  • So I want to tell you about my story.

  • I come from a family where I was highly encouraged to be curious science and even hearing where the core on my moment, Dad, all they wanted me to do is ask questions on if I had a question, there will give me books.

  • They will get me someone that specialized in the subject that they knew to help me so I can ask more questions on.

  • So I had no more questions to us.

  • So you can't even do you want to ask my mom and Dad where the babies come from?

  • Um, I definitely did not get the birds and bees talk.

  • I actually got my mom to call her sister, who's a biology professor, so she could explain to me the process, the biological process of creating life.

  • So that was my chapter.

  • On the other hand, um, when you are so curious, sometimes it doesn't work that well.

  • We're at school.

  • I was heavily believed.

  • I also had no friends.

  • And this was from the teachers from the students, especially from the teacher on my favorite class, which was at the time, biology.

  • I've always been into science, and the interesting thing is that I've actually found a lot of people, my friends from different countries, different part of the world, different cultures, that the same thing has happened to them.

  • They have been shamed.

  • They have him punished for being too curious or for asking too many questions.

  • Actually, if you think about, we're supposed to reach our peak off asking questions and career save over 45 And by the time on average, kids ask roughly 107 questions per hour.

  • That's a lot, right?

  • But is that when they're going to school, that number drops just completely drops all the way to Actually, progressively.

  • They stop asking questions to the point that they don't ask questions anymore.

  • Anyone here, he's a professor or electric.

  • I'm sure you on their son.

  • How frustrating that ISS when you're taking your those young adults and they're gonna ask you any questions, Yeah, so the thing about it is that is not produced when we're kids, what we grow leaders is, they say that they want to have curious months.

  • But the reality is that we're research shows.

  • Is that leaders in cos they think that curiosity is risky and also curiosity is inefficient.

  • Um, it is true that Progress City can be scary because it's exploring, Don't know.

  • But on the other side of the spectrum, the reality is that curiosity companies that foster curiosity in the workplace actually adopt faster and they perform better.

  • And this is critical in today's today's age.

  • Because there's digital disruption on, we need to really quickly adapt.

  • So we truly have to start thinking about curiosity differently and the way that I've elected think ferocity to you.

  • What we should be doing is 21 half proactive career city.

  • So we get people to actively ask questions and encourage them to do it, since they're cats all the way to the grown ups.

  • And the other thing is to think about empathetic for your city, because the thing is that it's not only about how you ask questions or right questions, you ask, but also about how you received and are you ready to receive.

  • And this is where the amicus becomes, so you have to think about people's intersectionality.

  • So gender race.

  • You also have to think about people's backgrounds and how those things relate to someone's perspective.

  • Because even though you might have two people that look obviously the same, I maybe come from the same country and they're the same gender.

  • That doesn't mean that they have the same lift experiences on by default, they will not have the same experiences, or they will not have the same needs from technology.

  • I, for example, I come from a country called Venezuela, which is in South America and the Caribbean.

  • And in my country I've been called a black lady.

  • I'm lot of you guys, his friends, and I'm sure a lot for your love you.

  • It makes you cringe.

  • But the thing is that what a lot of you might not know is that in my country we deal with race differently.

  • Even though look white on the outside, it might work on some.

  • We calling someone a black lady is a term of endearment is a beautiful thing to say to someone, and it's not based on the color of your skin.

  • There's a lot of historical reasons for that.

  • So have police going us questions and curious what we need.

  • Thio understand this difference is everywhere.

  • And for that we need to be ready to accept that someone will have a different life experience that we do.

  • So we have to strip down for biases and everything that we know.

  • So we can take in as much information we can because it is so important.

  • We were creating technology.

  • If you think about a I, for example, for machine learning, the way they were is that they make decisions based on what we teach, and it would teach them information that is one dimensional.

  • So just tell them about my gender.

  • I just tell them just where I come from.

  • If we just, you know, teach him information that is biased, they will make decisions based on that information.

  • So they weren't exactly like kids or us.

  • We get information, are we learning?

  • But the problem is that technology accelerates it and also makes it into a bigger scale.

  • So that means that anything that we create the have those biases will be accelerated on the negative impact will increase exponentially.

  • So we have to be able to see humans as month molded, eventually beans and only think about context.

  • I have a friend that he wasin a suffer silver engineering company and they had a day where they were allowed to create any technology.

  • They want it.

  • So the team decided to create this program that we have facial recognition.

  • When they came into the office, they will greet them.

  • Hi.

  • Good morning.

  • And they would say the name of the person happenings that ones that created it.

  • Um, my friend, the team that created it was all white, and he was the only black person in the room.

  • And even though the team that created it was reversed, um, the result was that the program did not identify my friend because, like you said, he was a dark, dark shade of black.

  • So even though sometimes in cos you think, Oh, if we have a diverse team, yes, it will help because at the question was asked afterwards, other technology was already created.

  • So in this case is not impactful because we're just talking about a small program that will grit in the morning, digging them to fight you.

  • OK, can you mind in this at a larger scale, have old these defectors on discrimination because of gender or race or color of your skin.

  • Those are more obvious.

  • Then we have algorithms.

  • There are also discriminating because of association.

  • It could be something as simple US.

  • You're not getting a loan because of where you live, who you hang out with and even just if you own a dog or not.

  • So we really need to start adding this dimensions up to these algorithms because they are everywhere.

  • At this moment, this is not the future.

  • This is Now.

  • We're using this algorithms and this complex programs to automate things like housing things like loans all the way to the criminal system.

  • And so we need to start thinking of people about this in basements of that multidimensional way.

  • And for that, we need to ask questions.

  • And we need to be curious, because otherwise we wouldn't know.

  • I want to give you my favorite example, which is about a car is a self driving car, so self driving car is a car that will make the decisions for you.

  • You're not driving, you're inside.

  • It will drive you so it has to be programmed to make decisions.

  • Where to steer isn't hostile right?

  • Lasts.

  • So imagine that you're in that self driving car and you're about to crash, and it's impossible.

  • It's impossible for you, not the crotch is inevitable.

  • You will crush, but you have two options you can steer to the left on DDE.

  • In that situation, you will kill a child.

  • You'll steer to the right, and in that situation you'll kill an elderly person.

  • Who do you say?

  • So what I find interesting is that research What they found.

  • A mighty research about this and what they found is that we as humans tend to choose the younger person and women.

  • So also these various.

  • If you come from a different country, they choose that all elderly person, because again, culture.

  • But did you know the rule is that people will choose young people and and Children, um, and women.

  • Sorry.

  • So if you have that self same self driving car and there'll be a man and a woman same age that by default means that the parlor that every time the woman will be safe.

  • So in this scenario, men that killed every single time, that's what just to think of all these horrendous and unfair, So you can't think about the sensations in one dimension.

  • Let's not more than mentions to this.

  • So what about is that person is influential?

  • All right, well, you choose a person as influential in the community or the president is very influential.

  • What makes a person influential, for starters is he, like, if he's a precedent, what does What does that even mean?

  • And as I'm asking you this, have you thought about what happens to you inside the car?

  • Are you supposed to be safe?

  • And what determines that you're safe?

  • Luckily, at this point in time, it's not legal to actually program all program the self driving cars to choose who beg to make the station's based on how we look on physical characteristics, other world someday, where this cars and his line in the far future.

  • This is happening soon that this cars are going to be out there making decisions, and we have to make sure that we ask enough questions so these decisions are fair.

  • I'm not only protecting one roof, and I love this example because it's an impossible example.

  • It's so difficult, hard braking.

  • Just to think that someone has to puts on creates this.

  • This rules that we do naturally as humans.

  • But we have to really this question.

  • We asked them ourselves.

  • We have to really think about the movie, created this technology.

  • So ask ask, because technology great and technology is a process.

  • I'm never saying if people wait to ask all the questions and then get the technology out there, it will take too long.

  • But it's not about getting it right the first time.

  • It's about being open to ask the questions and see what can we do.

  • Like in the case of my friend, they asked questions, and that's when when they saw the result, they saw it.

  • And then they ask the question, How so improved?

  • And we really need to think about this process when recruiting any type of technology.

  • So I want to invite you to be more curious, um, to start removing yourself from biases and start feeling comfortable with the idea of being incorrect.

  • I'm actually thinking that something very fun.

  • I'm even, he says.

  • You're annoying, correct.

  • Maybe you're not 100% right.

  • I'm thinking I can really add value and have more information and feel good about it.

  • About being wrong, be ready to be uncomfortable and to make other people feel uncomfortable.

  • So it's a lot of fun.

  • End.

  • Listen, really, truly listen.

  • Because if we want to create a fair world that is equal for everyone, where technology is helping everyone we need you is up to you to ask the questions and give the perspective that will create this technology.

  • Curiosity killed the cat satisfaction.

  • Read it back.

  • Thank you.

curiosity killed the cat Who's here have heard that saying, Basically everyone in the room this saying, Actually, it's a very old saying It can be traced back all the way to the 16th century.

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好奇心、テクノロジーのために!| ビクトリア・マッソ|TEDxBirminghamCityUniversity (Curiosity, for tech's sake! | Victoria Masso | TEDxBirminghamCityUniversity)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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