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  • you may be familiar with the concept called the Gig economy.

  • Now, this increasingly popular term relates to the idea that more and more people are working in gigs rather than traditional full time rolls.

  • Now the idea behind this is to have more control and flexibility around your own working hours and such.

  • And yet people don't seem to understand that the level of protection that is afforded to them drops below that of employee status.

  • The awareness of worker status is something that we, as a project, are seeking to resolve.

  • Employees have the highest level of protection with them work a status.

  • Yet independent contractors are left with a much level lower level of protection, and they have considerably less stability within that rolls.

  • The desire for flexibility, coupled with an imbalance negotiating power, means that those who follow the path of independence are left sacrificing rights and protection in order to achieve flexible hours.

  • And even though people are choosing to follow flexible paths and have their own hours, they find that they failed to meet their initial aims as they find themselves working overtime on DDE have left much less time for a family balance on work life balance.

  • For example, Over Christmas delivery, drivers for many companies found themselves with only minutes with their families over the festive period, despite working and rolls that supposedly promote flexibility on.

  • Working Your air in hours, however, is not on the independent contractors who find themselves with no free time.

  • Employees with the level of increase of technology in the workplace means that people find themselves working in this 24 hour culture.

  • This workaholic culture is something that we are all guilty to sort of succumbing to what some people might find, that having that emails on their phone and taking work calls outside of the office is something that suits them.

  • I know there will be so many people who dread having work holes outside of office hours, and those who are in more senior roles may find that they have opted out of the statutory working week in their contracts.

  • But many people are unaware that such a statue even exists.

  • You have protection through the law.

  • Why is it so normalized that we make no time for ourselves on work?

  • 24 7 We succumb to this workaholic culture that is increasingly popular in modern day life get it fails to find the balance that unbuttoned a family needs.

  • Why do we find that we have to work constantly in order to achieve our aims, yet feel like we can't have it all and have a family and a good career?

  • Well, you may not know what your worker status is at the minute.

  • By finding out, you can have the potential to save yourself a lot of hassle in the future.

  • These are the reasons why you need to know your rights.

  • As I'm sure many of you are aware, it can be very difficult to find a work life balance in the 24 7 culture.

  • Family life is something that many prioritized, but there is lucky realization of its legal basis.

  • The right to even have a private and family life comes from the Human Rights Act, and ability to exercise that right depends upon adherence to legal formalities.

  • So what are these?

  • These are the rules sitting behind the rules, like when you're in school and the rulers no cheating.

  • It means no copying, no plagiarism, et cetera.

  • It's just the same when getting married, for example, you must give notice, have capacity, give consent, although you probably shouldn't be thinking about cheating when you stood at the altar.

  • The same goes for divorce.

  • Wilson Probate, parental leave, child welfare all have these bodies of legal formality, which is where people trip up.

  • The law must adopt a societal change, but it can be difficult for policymakers to keep pace with the rate of development.

  • This leaves areas of the law crying out for action.

  • Take divorce, for example.

  • It's gone on reform for years to spot despite clear public need.

  • This is because of government preoccupation with political agendas, which saw the recent bill failed due to lack of parliamentary time.

  • This has left the law remaining to be confusing, discriminatory and hostile.

  • Look at cohabitation is another example.

  • This receives lucking legal recognition despite being the fastest growing family type.

  • This leaves couples having to jump through costly administrative hoops to gain access to rights over property finance and Children.

  • These barricades leave so many people without access to any rights at all.

  • So what can we do to change this?

  • Part of our initiative is about shaping young minds, including our own, to be the next generation of forward thinking lawyers.

  • Throughout my volunteer work, many things have stood out to me as impractical and need in action.

  • And tracing these things back to their roots has led me to one conclusion.

  • The disconnection between the law and the everyday person leads to misapplication on divergence.

  • As a law student with so much appreciation for the legal system, this is really difficult for me to see, and it's why I want to diversify the law.

  • So my proposition to you is that we collaborate in making law, making something for everybody to participate in and something that supports our community.

  • In contrast, as being areas of action that I've had lucking effect, the government spent £1.5 million raising awareness of shared parental leave.

  • You're only 50% of the population of even heard of it.

  • I'm sure many of you here today can think of alternative ways to use these resources, and these would have a bigger impact.

  • But without the backing from legislators.

  • It's so hard for individuals to act the benefit of knowing your rights regarding family life and family friendly working is gaining access to full entitlement following these legal formalities ensures any arrangements you make a legitimate.

  • And this knowledge backed with valley juice of policy helps to avoid vulnerability.

  • And this is why you need to know your rights.

  • My incredible sociology teacher, once right out quoting costuming.

  • Some of you may have heard this quote.

  • It reads.

  • Knowledge is power.

  • One city in law.

  • I didn't realize the power of this quote.

  • I really can't stress enough the importance of knowing illegal rights.

  • Annoying what support is out there for yourselves in your community.

  • So I've been to India recently.

  • Doing so made work on one thing.

  • That again from being in India, was I opened my eyes.

  • The lack of knowledge between some of the members of the society is that I worked with on their knowledge on the law and their rights, it was brought to my attention and that they obviously weren't aware fully aware some avenues of the law, Um, and that knowledge that I gained from India really inspired me to help contribute back in my own house.

  • Back in my own home in the UK, I'll be on a smaller scale to try and make a change to try and get people the knowledge on the law and inspire them to look for the rights.

  • As a law student, I could even find the law sometimes really difficult to navigate.

  • So I can't imagine what it's like for people who have never even studied law and never look, let alone read the statute book.

  • So with this in mind collects live the four of us we go went about setting up the Chester Community Law Project to help spread some knowledge on the law and in hoping of making it more accessible by going into community groups and educating them and how to apply for legal fund in on what it can cover.

  • Despite legal aid cuts in some areas for the areas that do you remain, you might even be entitled to legal aid.

  • So it's important to research about it and obviously, look for the project.

  • I'll look for the law clinics in your local area, which offer this help, Um, because you do have the right to legal representation, so why not apply through it through legal aid?

  • I wanted to find out a bit more information about other types of people in our communities who found the law and accessible and lacking diversity, such as adults at risk.

  • Speaking to professionals who worked directly through the care act in particular section for you too.

  • It was agreed that this has been one of the biggest changes in legislation in over 60 years.

  • Um, it really strives, supports diverse in this area of the law and it's one of the biggest.

  • It's one of the biggest laws that really pushed people live independently on.

  • And also there s state intervention if necessary.

  • On an example of how the Lorries change to spread diverse between us, talking to all the local authority is in particular the police, the police force of has independent advisory groups.

  • I'm not sure people have heard of those before, and but the group's made of members of the public who vice personal experiences about their communities are even other communities that live experience in the event of an incident with a police matter.

  • And the knowledge from the I N G.

  • Is that the police have gained, um it affects their approach in a situation um, which ensures fair police and service to everyone with the goal of ensuring divers in the communities are members of society from await a wide range of background and heritage, so reflect on what I've just talked about.

  • The underlying principle to address the deficit in divers in the law is using the results.

  • Is that information out there available to you and knowing where the support isn't how to find it?

  • So, like I said, knowledge is power and this is why you need to know, he writes.

  • I want to discuss diversity in relation to education.

  • I believe that promoting diversity in education is beneficial for both teachers and students.

  • I'm a self of witnesses firsthand, a teach dance on a voluntary basis to Children from different, different ethnic minority backgrounds.

  • On in primary school, I grew up with a child who had autism and be honest, it was the best thing.

  • So why don't want to discuss education?

  • Well, education is the foundation to most of our future career paths on DDE.

  • As a young girl myself, I want to say to my dad he'd set his laptop.

  • He's always work, and I'd say, Dad, why you always work in who would say Well, the world never stops learning, so why should I?

  • That said, at the age of nine.

  • I didn't really feel like doing the extra homework, but, you know, increase in my awareness As I've grown older, I've really understood the importance of what he said.

  • Not only now are we learning and developing as human beings.

  • We have the likes of artificial intelligence, and if we look at what that is, it's self learning technology.

  • So why do we supply and why'd we stop educating ourselves?

  • Cultural integration is increasing so rapidly, and I think that we need ourselves needs become aware of this.

  • Most people grow up with celebrities being that role models to May.

  • It's my dad.

  • He himself is faced diversity within education.

  • He moved from Portugal, South Africa at the age of seven, unable to speak a word of English, he taught himself English and went on to be very successful in his education.

  • But when he came to go into university, he was offered the chance to study a very prestigious tech school in America, but could not do so.

  • Just lack of funding.

  • And what if I'm the sort of thought really we go to university, we can take action alone on it.

  • It baffled me because under the Human Rights Act, we all have the right to education.

  • But what does this mean?

  • What means that each individual in the UK from the ages of 4 to 18 could go and receive education for free?

  • And then, if you choose to, you can go to university on a student loan?

  • Should you choose to do so?

  • A recent article stated to me that fees were a barrier to people who wanted to go into a further education, higher education on looking into this.

  • That is true.

  • On average, for the legal profession.

  • It costs 27 a half £1000.

  • But that's for getting a maintenance loan as well as the cost of the qualifying solicitors example or Forrester exams.

  • 27% of people from ethnic minority backgrounds felt that their ethnicity was a barrier to sort of profession.

  • And I myself kind of certain thought, You know what?

  • That's a very high percentage, and knowing your rights here is highly important.

  • Under the equality after 2010 everybody is protected for equal pay and equal opportunity.

  • The act protects characteristics such as sex, gender, religion, race just to name a few.

  • An equal opportunity allows for any job that you apply for for you to be treated fairly without judgments based on stereotypes.

  • I have seen this difference from when I first applied for a part time job where there was no equal opportunity forme.

  • Thio apply.

  • And now for recent placements.

  • Whether is that equal opportunity forme and you know what I think, it really is highlighting to mate that the law is progressing on society is progressing as well.

  • Despite the legal profession, for example, being associated typically with white middle aged men, there is evidence that this is changing a recent statistic para lighter to meet that 52% of midsize law firms are female workers.

  • Whilst this may seem like a big difference, it still needs more.

  • One in five lawyers in the UK come from the Bane Group on This has also increased.

  • So it's showing that in just the 10 years since this act has been implemented, that is a change, and this is why you need to know your rights.

  • Diversity within a workforce is so beneficial allows the people who say are coming back from long term sick leave to work from home to integrate themselves back in allows.

  • For women who feel that they might be prevented from going for a job or losing their job because of a family life it doesn't exist, allows for a more efficient workforce.

  • It promotes fairness amongst all, and it creates this environment that everybody wants to work in.

  • I myself have always been wary off the fact that when I have a career, I may have to potentially choose between a family life or Korea and knowing my rights.

  • Now I know I don't actually have to do that coming.

  • That's what my dad said.

  • The world never stopped learning.

  • So why should wait?

  • If we start learning from a very, very young age that diversity is your society, they'll no longer be this stigma attached to it.

  • It would just simply be the norm in society.

  • In life.

  • Almost all of us go through education, employment, family life on some experience from nobility.

  • If you start learning now, it'll help.

  • If your future.

you may be familiar with the concept called the Gig economy.

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あなたの権利|Chloe Convery, Megan Crowley, Julie Grifo, Stephanie Eid|TEDxUoChester (Your Rights | Chloe Convery, Megan Crowley, Julie Grifo, Stephanie Eid | TEDxUoChester)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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