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  • Last time I did a run of guest videos,

  • we had an enthusiastic young presenter talking about food science

  • and backing it up with an experiment.

  • Well, we are doing it again!

  • Alex, from Technicality Studios, it's all yours.

  • This is Splenda.

  • It's known as a zero-calorie sweetener or a healthy replacement for sugar.

  • Splenda no calorie sweetener, with the original sugar-like taste you love and trust.”

  • Hold up.

  • Wait a minute.

  • How is this even possible?

  • Have you ever thought to yourself it's a little strange that a food has zero calories?

  • Can any even have that?

  • Well, yes.

  • It's theoretically possible.

  • Think of it this way.

  • If you, say, eat plastic, nothing really will happen.

  • Plastic has zero usable calories.

  • If you eat it, you can't take energy from it.

  • Don't eat plastic, by the way.

  • This is just an example.

  • So, before answering how many calories Splenda really has, if any,

  • we first have to answer if Splenda has any usable calories at all.

  • How do we do that?

  • Well, when we eat and digest sugar, or sucrose,

  • our body turns it into glucose and fructose.

  • Fructose is delivered to your liver and promptly turned into glucose,

  • and glucose is the stuff your body uses as energy.

  • To find out if there's any calories in this packet of Splenda,

  • we have to find out if there's any glucose in this packet of Splenda

  • and finding that's easy, or at least,

  • it seemed easy after my chemistry teacher explained that to me like 20 times.

  • We'll do two experiments.

  • For the first experiment, the control test,

  • we'll dissolve 0.2 grams of sugar and 0.1 grams of an enzyme called invertase in water.

  • Enzymes are things that speed up chemical reactions, or catalysts.

  • Thus, the enzyme will quickly break down sugar into glucose and fructose.

  • In the second experiment, we'll use the exact same procedure,

  • but change one material.

  • Instead of using sugar, we'll use Splenda.

  • Let's go to the lab.

  • Now that we've gathered all the materials, let's get started.

  • Note to future editing self: this is Splenda.

  • This is sugar.

  • So, now I'm going to dissolve both of those things in water,

  • in these things, test tubes.

  • Now that we've dissolved everything in the test tube,

  • let's put them in a warm water bath like this for 20 minutes.

  • The water should be about 37 degrees Celsius or body temperature.

  • This is the best temperature for the enzymes.

  • After letting it sit for 20 minutes,

  • I'm going to put in Benedict's solution.

  • Benedict's solution will tell us if there's glucose in these test tubes.

  • Benedict's solution is named after Stanley Rossiter Benedict, an American chemist,

  • and not Benedict Cumberbatch, a British actor.

  • This is a disappointment.

  • It's now time to goggle up.

  • Now, when we put in the Benedict's solution,

  • we're going to replace the 37-degree water with boiling water.

  • Then, let's add in a few drops and wait for the Benedict's solution to do its thing.

  • So, we just learned that how Benedict's solution works is basically it's a spectrum,

  • right?

  • So, blue would be the least amount of glucose, no glucose.

  • And then there's red, which would be the most amount of glucose,

  • that's a lot of glucose.

  • Now, as you can see, these two are basically kind of orangey-caramel coloured,

  • but the one in the Splenda solution actually is a little darker and a little more intense,

  • if you look really closely.

  • So, that means there's actually more glucose in the Splenda than the actual sugar.

  • Isn't that crazy?

  • I mean, I was blown away.

  • Splenda, which is marketed as a zero-calorie alternative to sugar,

  • actually has more glucose than actual sugar.

  • Why?

  • Well Splenda's most-used ingredient is dextrose.

  • You know what that is?

  • A fancy word for glucose.

  • So, how many calories are in these packets?

  • Four.

  • Four calories.

  • How do we know that?

  • Well,

  • I emailed Splenda Customer Service.

  • And they wrote back that there are four calories

  • in each single serve packet of Splenda no calorie sweetener

  • because that makes sense.

  • Side note here, one gram of sugar has four calories

  • and each packet of Splenda is about a gram.

  • But wait a sec.

  • If each packet has four calories,

  • why is Splenda allowed to say they have none?

  • That seems pretty sketchy.

  • It might seem sketchy, but it's completely legal.

  • The Food and Drug Administration allows foods with fewer than five calories per serving

  • to be marketed as having zero calories down to the nutrition label.

  • That means you can't trust any food that claims it has zero calories.

  • Well, now you know.

  • Until next time,

  • thank you so very much for watching.

  • Thank you to Tom for giving me the privilege of making a guest video.

  • Thank you to my chemistry teacher for staying late

  • and helping me with every little annoying thing I asked for.

  • DFTBA, and explore on!

  • Go subscribe to Alex's channel!

  • Let's be honest, he's going to have my job in a few years,

  • so you're just getting in early.

  • That is it for this run of guest videos.

  • Thank you very much for watching.

  • Thank you to all the presenters.

  • I'll be back next time and, until then, I will see you on the Internet!

Last time I did a run of guest videos,

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この「ゼロカロリー甘味料」がゼロカロリーではない理由 (Why This “Zero Calorie Sweetener” Isn’t Zero Calories)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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