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  • This is St Peter's Seminary, about an hour west of Glasgow in Scotland.

  • Or rather, it was.

  • It was built in the 1960s to be a training school for priests,

  • and I think it's a beautiful ruin of a building.

  • But then, I like Modernist architecture like this.

  • In 1992, this was put on the list of historic Scottish buildings

  • in category A, which means that it's of national or international importance.

  • And architecturally, it is one of the most important modern buildings in Scotland.

  • But, by the time it was listed, it had already been closed for years.

  • The Catholic church had decided that priests should train in towns and cities,

  • not in remote places like this.

  • And besides, times were changing.

  • There weren't as many people who wanted to be priests.

  • No one was interested in buying the place, and the church couldn't afford to keep

  • an empty and extremely high-maintenance building running for no purpose.

  • One of the troubles with a unique structure like this

  • is that it's expensive and difficult to keep repaired.

  • So, a quarter of a century later, what's left looks... rough.

  • - The Archdiocese of Glasgow has been responsible for it

  • since the moment it opened.

  • It was building which was very difficult to reuse,

  • because it had been custom built.

  • No developer wanted a building that had a huge, concrete chapel in it.

  • We have a responsibility to try and preserve the ruin, as best we can.

  • It is now a ruin. It's covered in graffiti, it's inaccessible, it's dangerous.

  • We have, by statute, to try and maintain some kind of security

  • in that area, to insure it and so on.

  • But after 40 years, we are at our wits' end.

  • In 40 years we have worked with every imaginable idea.

  • Developers have thought of turning it into a community centre,

  • or a hotel complex, and everything in between.

  • There were inherent weaknesses in the building.

  • Those who lived there have nightmarish stories of water ingress, for example,

  • of the fact that the wind would blow so strongly through the windows,

  • that curtains would be lifted to be almost horizontal.

  • So the building itself was not an easy building to live in or work in,

  • which made it even more difficult to find an alternative use for it.

  • - One arts organisation spent millions on making it safer,

  • removing asbestos and old fittings, using it as a stage for light shows,

  • hoping to turn it into an arts venue.

  • But then they ran out of money.

  • And besides, by design, this building's in the middle of nowhere.

  • There's a village a mile down the road, but that's it.

  • There are better places for arts venues.

  • And there's no way in law to just abandon a building like this.

  • You can 'tjust decide that it doesn't spark joy anymore

  • and donate it to a charity shop.

  • And if definitely can't be knocked down,

  • because it's a really significant, listed building.

  • - So it's not just a listed building, it's a grade A listed building.

  • It's the highest form of listing possible, and we are required to stick to

  • all sorts of rules about not using it for any alternative purpose,

  • not amending it, trying to keep the area around safe.

  • Legally, we would give that building away, with the estate, but whoever takes it on

  • takes on responsibility for insurance, for security, for upkeep and so on.

  • So it's not so easy. You literally can't give it away.

  • There have been expressions of interest, but when it comes down to it,

  • it's a question of money, of finance.

  • Because the building itself swallows vast amounts of money,

  • and even to maintain it in its current ruined state,

  • costs the Archdiocese something like £60,000 a year.

  • People have looked at the area around, because it's on a beautiful estate.

  • They have looked at perhaps building houses there

  • and using the profit from that.

  • But that has been denied because there are greenbelt issues which prevent that, too.

  • And so there's something tragic about it, there's something haunting about it.

  • It's unrealistic to expect some sort of deus ex machina.

  • We remain open to working with anyone who wants to come forward with plans, with ideas,

  • but at the same time, realistically, this is bigger than us.

  • This is something for the state, something for the nation.

  • And most people would probably say,

  • "what a mess".

  • Those that understand buildings, and that have an understanding of

  • brutalist architecture, would see it as an extraordinary treasure.

  • That's the reality.

  • It is both.

  • - If this was centuries old, rather than decades,

  • it'd be a national treasure.

  • The Scottish government would probably pay to restore it.

  • You could charge an admission fee.

  • Parents would bring their kids to picnic in the grounds.

  • And the idea of spraying graffiti on it would be abhorrent.

  • But, apparently, it isn't.

  • Despite the fact that this is a one-of-a-kind historic religious building.

  • This place has enormous historical and cultural value

  • but a negative financial value.

  • And that, it turns out, is a very difficult place to be in.

This is St Peter's Seminary, about an hour west of Glasgow in Scotland.

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破壊してはならない壊れた建物 (The Broken Building That Must Not Be Destroyed)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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