Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

  • Hi, I'm Neal.

  • Joining me today is Georgina.

  • Hello, Georgina.

  • Hi, everyone.

  • Okay, so what's Alice story?

  • We've got a story today about video gaming and how it might be harmful.

  • Okay, Possible harmful effects of video gaming.

  • Let's hear some more about this from a clip from BBC Radio one.

  • Blue boxes in video games should be cast as gambling.

  • That's all.

  • The Children's commissioner for England ones and Long Field also thinks games need to introduce a maximum daily spending limit for players.

  • So do you play video games?

  • I don't like kids do well, you'll be very interested in this.

  • Story is all about how Children are spending lots of money on loot boxes, so Luke boxes are packages of elements that help you be a better competitors, a better player.

  • So, for example, on FIFA, you can buy a package of players.

  • You don't know who you're buying, but it costs you money, and that's what it's about.

  • Is Children's spending money on the's Luke boxes on.

  • That's why on Long Field, the Children's Commissioner for England feels that they encourage Children to spend extravagantly on video gaming on are a form of gambling.

  • She would like to introduce a spending limit to stop Children from paying hundreds of pounds on Luke boxes in video games.

  • Okay, well, you have been looking at this story.

  • You've picked out three words and expressions that we can use to talk about them.

  • What are they?

  • Yes, I have.

  • They are splashing cash labeled and curb splashing cash labels on dhe curb.

  • So your first headline, please.

  • With splashing cash.

  • My first headline is from the mirror and it is kids splashing cash chases, lot chasing losses on online games like fortnight are gambling.

  • Okay, Splashing cash, spending lots of money on something.

  • Yes, and it's about s p l A s h i N g on the second word is spelt uh see a s h.

  • Okay.

  • Well, I know what splashing is when you go swimming and you hit the water with your hand.

  • That splashing, isn't it?

  • It is on What does water, cash and video gaming have to do with each other?

  • well in this context in this headline, it's being used to talk about throwing money at something.

  • So it's not just throwing money, it's spending money on something, and it's not just a little bit of money.

  • It's quite a bit of money.

  • So if you could imagine a pool, a pool of money and you hit the surface and it goes up like this yes, exactly.

  • So it makes quite a big impact.

  • Let's say so.

  • Here it's being it's used Maur inner informal context.

  • So I definitely wouldn't go to my bank manager and say Hi, bank manager.

  • I've decided to splash cash on a new house.

  • Can I have a mortgage?

  • Right?

  • You might ask more formally for a loan or something?

  • Yes, exactly.

  • Could I, you know, have could I organized?

  • Or could it?

  • Yes, you would have said I'd like to splash some cash.

  • Likewise, you would be unlikely to hear the finance minister of a country standing in Parliament and saying we have decided to splash £10 billion on a new education policy.

  • No.

  • Yeah, that would sound very, very strange.

  • Although after they have presented their idea in Parliament, you may hear them talking about it together as work colleagues in an informal contacts.

  • Like, I can't believe he's splashing cash on this or ex awhile.

  • Why hasn't he splashed cash on this?

  • So it's definitely in a more informal contacts.

  • For example, I could speak to my dad and say, Dad, I'm just I've decided I'm splashing cash on a new car at the weekend, Okay?

  • This is also used in a slightly different form.

  • We have similar meaning to splash out on something.

  • Yes, exactly.

  • S o I could splash out on a new sofa, which I have.

  • Why I could splash cash on a new sofa as well.

  • So yeah, splash cash to splash out on something.

  • Yeah, exactly.

  • Okay, let's now move on to our second headline, please.

  • Our second headline is from The Telegraph Is Children spending £250 on fortnight skins to avoid being labeled the poor kid at school.

  • Children's commissioner warns, OK, labels called or seen as yes, and in this our headline, it is spelt l a b e l e d, which is actually the American English spelling, which is strange because it's the telegraph.

  • But in fact, in British English spelling.

  • It can be spelled L a B e l l e d Finally.

  • Okay.

  • This clearly comes from the word label.

  • Yeah, I know.

  • What that means in a label is something you put on.

  • For example, you might have a label on your shirt.

  • It is the brand.

  • Oh, you might write on something and stick it to something that describes it.

  • So, what is this?

  • Why are we using it here?

  • Well, yes, you're right.

  • So a label is something that you stick on somebody to identify them as something so in the headline, because the kids are not spending lots of money on, you know, Luke boxes or fortnight skins.

  • I think they're called.

  • They are being labeled the poor kids.

  • Now, that doesn't mean that somebody has written poor kid on a sticker and put it on them.

  • But it's almost as if they have done that.

  • Exactly.

  • And s o, in this context, it's actually quite serious label.

  • It's not a nice label.

  • Like you could be labeled as an attentive, caring dad.

  • Happy you could be sued by I don't know your your wife, but not by myself.

  • Definitely not by yourself?

  • No, because it's something.

  • It's used in a passive sense, as opposed to you.

  • Label yourself.

  • Somebody else labels you as something.

  • Okay, so we've got somebody who's been labeled.

  • Oh, yeah, I think I know who you're talking about, aunt.

  • He has being labeled on a number of occasions as a biscuit thief.

  • Yes, no names.

  • But his name begins with an R Yeah, and ends with an O.

  • B.

  • On.

  • If you want to say that in the same way, as it said in the headline, we would say Rob tried to avoid being labeled a biscuit thief but was caught eating the last one.

  • Absolutely perfect example.

  • Okay, if you are interested in gaming and computer games, we have a program in another Siri's called six Minute English on the Rise off E sports, which you can find a way.

  • George, you can find the link in the comments box below.

  • Just have a look at the bottom and moving on now to our final headline, please.

  • Yes, our final headline is from The Guardian is clamped down on fortnight loot boxes urges Children's commissioner on long field calls for action to curb young players excessive in game spending.

  • Curb stop or control something that is not wanted.

  • Yes, and it's spelt C u r B on this headline is used as a verb, but it can be also used as a noun.

  • It means to stop or limit something that is bad.

  • Okay, so could I say caffeine is bad for May.

  • I have decided to curb my coffee drinking.

  • You could, but it would sound a bit strange and people would be like, What's happened to Neil?

  • Is he suddenly turned into a professor or something?

  • It would be quite out of character because it sounds quite formal and it's normally used.

  • I mean, obviously, coffee drinking can be serious, but in a mall kind of serious context.

  • So I suppose it depends on where you're going to say this.

  • Okay.

  • So, for example, there has been a smoking ban in public places in this country for a number of years Now, the aim of that waas to curb smoking on which would eventually reduce the number of people who were well, hopefully reduce.

  • The number of people who got sick with the disease is associated with smoking, So it's definitely in a more serious context.

  • You could.

  • It may be something that the council says s O.

  • For example, the council increased cut parking fires to curb illegal clocking.

  • You mean a local government?

  • Yeah, or the local government?

  • Exactly.

  • So that's it would be something that it's more likely to be used in that context.

  • Okay, there is another word with exactly the same sound and pronunciation with a completely different meaning and spelling.

  • Exactly.

  • So Thea.

  • Other word is spelt k e r B, but it's pronounced curb on.

  • It's talking about the edge of the pavement.

  • So you have the road down the middle, and then you got the pavement on that little edge.

  • The little trim is called a curb.

  • That's right, and it's not connected to this at all.

  • Nothing to do with it.

  • Okay, yes, on that gives us now just a chance to recap the vocabulary, please.

  • Yes, So the three words from today's show are splashing cash, spending lots of money on something labeled called or seen as Andi last but not least, curb stop or control something that is not wanted.

  • If you would like to test yourself on the vocabulary in this program, There's a quiz you can take on our website BBC Learning english dot com, where you can find all kinds of other videos and activities to help you improve your English.

  • And of course, we have a free app that you can download.

  • Thank you for joining us and good bye bye.

  • He's a review from BBC Learning English.

  • Hi, everyone.

  • We hope you enjoyed that video on.

  • Thank you very much for watching.

  • We have so many more.

  • Just like it.

  • So if you don't want to miss a single one, make sure to subscribe and we will see you regularly hope to see you soon.

  • Bye, guys.

he's a review from BBC Learning English Hello and welcome to News Review The program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級

ゲームは子供をギャンブル依存症にしている?ニュースレビューを見る (Is gaming turning children into gamblers? Watch News Review)

  • 0 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語