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  • way.

  • Just see it.

  • My recording.

  • This.

  • Hello, everyone.

  • I live streaming, apparently from, uh, interactive Media Arts Program and I t p at New York University of Logistical.

  • The arts.

  • My name is Dan.

  • You're watching coding train, which is this gentle?

  • I feel very awkward.

  • Embarrassed about doing right now.

  • I want to just get a couple of logistic things out of the way.

  • This microphone is not actually doing anything.

  • It is recording audio as, like backup audio.

  • But there is a new mike attached to the phone that we're live streaming.

  • And so hopefully you can hear me.

  • People can hear me.

  • OK, great.

  • So just let us know in the chat how the audio is Look at the cameras.

  • Oh, I'm looking at the mike.

  • Yes, let us thank you.

  • Let us know in the chat if how the audio is doing hopefully it's gonna be better this year than any other year before.

  • So this is what you're tuning into.

  • There are two programs here.

  • There's an undergraduate program called I Am a Interactive Media Arts.

  • There's a graduate program called TP Interactive Telecommunications programs, a Tear master's program.

  • Both of these programs are at Tisch School of the Arts, which is this building 7 21 Broadway in Manhattan, in New York City on her New York University.

  • So this is the end of semester show.

  • Of all the students work, they're probably over 100 projects.

  • I don't know how many will get to.

  • We've gotten toe, like, 30 plus projects before.

  • Go for an hour or two or two.

  • We all in Esteem.

  • Who's behind the camera and be true here.

  • Is helping mantra.

  • Yeah, on.

  • So I'm just gonna wander around and show you projects.

  • What else do I want to say?

  • Anything important?

  • Uh, I think that's good.

  • And then at some point, also probably tried to make an edited compilation video of Just highlight some of the projects.

  • All right, so let's move.

  • Can be How's it going over there?

  • You want to be our first project?

  • Okay, so we're gonna come on over here, take a look at, so tell us your name and your senses about your project will get some kind of Kimmy.

  • Kimmy said you wanted I have a multi model.

  • Don't you know you can play in the browser life several way.

  • Dad was playing with his nose.

  • Uses facial recognition.

  • Thio Lying plate.

  • Your brother, That's one.

  • We'll clean it and then the other way paid a touch screen so you could just wait way familiar with you.

  • Tell us a little about the origins of some piano.

  • Why the notes of context their way.

  • I just meant I'm interested in the thumb.

  • Piano as an instrument used has different shapes and a lot of the shapes, Like needing a calabash writhe like a modern Bergen, you know, which is like a square.

  • I need it, actually, for people with muscle for, like, an adoptive parent.

  • Complete training, you know, game with music.

  • You know, twin brother without having to worry about fucking notes.

  • You know, you're trying to make way.

  • And you made this with five others.

  • There's no requirement to be five Jack here.

  • Yes, I used to be five, and it was quite refreshing of relieving to use p five because, you know, you can see all the tools.

  • It's sort of like you know what coating now, five Director.

  • This way.

  • Okay, go.

  • Go.

  • Bye, baby.

  • Wait.

  • Oh, my goodness.

  • Okay.

  • Next next person won't necessarily get that we'll get a random one, but that one is just entered.

  • I love the idea of just like a database job like Michael with.

  • Yeah, okay, yeah, we'll just tell people to talk louder, so that doesn't surprise me that way.

  • Have we've never had, like, a great audio ATT?

  • Least I'm capturing this audio and we'll be able to put stuff together afterward.

  • But thank you for mentioned What's going on here.

  • So for the first time ever, perhaps, Oh, I remember something I want to talk about the first time ever.

  • But it's been a little while.

  • But now this year, on the TV show, there is a performance room, and this is actually the performance schedule.

  • So it's 4:26 p.m. Matt Ross will be performing Pillow Taco.

  • There's an introduction before that.

  • Emma will be producing complication of the computer mouse.

  • At 4 54 PM, you tell us what that's about things is Emma Election, based on about six months of research on the computer analysis, isn't object.

  • Talking about gender is an active getting the materiality of it.

  • Don't worry about speaking up into this.

  • It's this Mike that's actually picking you up.

  • Yeah, great.

  • Well, we're gonna try to sneak into catching the performance.

  • That would be great.

  • We're going right on time.

  • Okay, Okay.

  • Thanks.

  • Great.

  • All right, all right.

  • You want to tell us quickly about your projects, just tell us your name.

  • And if you were about what we're seeing here for, my name is Michael Bluhm.

  • My name is Michael Bluhm, and this is a platform to help educate users about some of the recent advances in natural language generating technology, which are basically, consider algorithms that are capable of generating text similar to what you were I would would write.

  • And I think it's important to sort of learn more about them and know more about them because not only would be be better able to sort of harness thes technologies were creative ends, but also just be more country consists of some of the sort of not so great things about them.

  • I mean, there's a lot of issues driving bias and misuse, So those are some things that I'd like to sort of trying some light on it.

  • You will find this online if they're looking for it is not a thing is a predator I'm playing.

  • Okay.

  • We're gonna include links in the video's description to all the different projects.

  • So hopefully, if this goes on live will find it through their great awesome.

  • Okay, let's come check this out.

  • I promise you, Gina.

  • And, uh, this is P five shakers.

  • I worked on my partner Lisa vessel, and it's essentially a collection of examples of shakers and p five that basically and a guide to basically show people what they can do with strangers and p five.

  • Why they want to strangers and p five verses your pixel function different couple of examples webcam and have him running in my browser.

  • It's not slowing down there performing documentation.

  • Games go through the wide what?

  • How like this is just like some kittens with using load pixels to increase of brightness, depending on distance, mouth using Schrader's weight faster, you just switched from low pixel shader cooking that but yeah.

  • So what would you say if people are Maybe they know little p five.

  • They know about you, but I've never done any changes before.

  • The idea shares completely do Well, where would you suggest they get started?

  • Is this the place where they could get.

  • You could definitely get started here way Go through what shares are out to get him set up by.

  • We've been like some explanation about what's actually going on on in the background.

  • So, yeah, if you wantto in the even had to use this resource with other resource, like book of Chez Tres right way teacher on this is the euro up there?

  • Yeah.

  • Also bit lee slash people slash five owners.

  • Cool.

  • I get that requested a lot of girls on changers and I have never done that.

  • So this will be helpful.

  • Great.

  • Thank you.

  • Great.

  • Okay, coming this way.

  • You want to join us in a little while in a little while?

  • We're gonna maybe take a little break for me and have a Spanish language version of Okay, Let's come.

  • Let's stop here.

  • Talk about the feedback.

  • You tell us your name and a little bit about your food processing.

  • It's using using the letter.

  • I visualize the camera image, but it's also measuring the overall image to create some sort of feedback.

  • It's adjustable.

  • All right, So when you started now, I could understand what's going on much for now.

  • So this is very clear committee.

  • The 1 to 1 relationship picks on kind of angle of this line when you started to have, it's almost like swirling fluid like quality to it.

  • What, Is that a fact, or what's the parameter that you're adjusting?

  • One is the angle that's meant to the brightness of the camera, and the other one is the Frighteners.

  • They tell you.

  • So Lim started touching each other.

  • They start because that's off right now.

  • That is because there are okay.

  • Angle is already like, Yeah, yeah, this is not the same thing.

  • I don't know what it's like to feel like this, but it depends on the value you call and set up.

  • So even if we change it after, we just stay that way Exact same two things.

  • But this one is ended a three dfx outside, so I'm just going wonderful.

  • It's a very unique, seen lots of variations of this kind of idea, but this idea of having sexual feedback angle it's very unique and creates a beautiful job.

  • Okay, Crater creator soothe.

  • You tell us your name and a little bit about your project.

  • Sure, my name's Billy Bennett and I have a five sketch was particles which you may recognize the nature of code.

  • Yeah, I rigged up this musical.

  • Want to play music?

  • Aziz, Swing it across.

  • Wait, you weren't expecting to see a lot of waiting around.

  • It's mostly a lot of waiting around and confusion there like what'll I do.

  • But once they get them left and right way, I really loathe waiting for instigating these moments of the booth.

  • Uh, I don't know.

  • Might be hard to explain in this contact.

  • Let's give it a try.

  • So will you tell us your name and a little bit about your project?

  • Sure.

  • My name is Jan Ove it.

  • And this is my pieces that I need it self driving him in.

  • It's about what does the future feel like when guarded by sir making decisions for us?

  • Some that are very uncomfortable, So yeah.

  • Yeah, Don't worry about this microphone.

  • Okay.

  • So making a future with device, you're making decisions for us.

  • That might make us uncomfortable.

  • So I made a artificial intelligence device that makes me do what's very uncomfortable, which is talking to strangers on the way it works when it identifies people.

  • Don't you see here on the camera.

  • So there's like it's identifying people using a quarrel, which is a machine learning piece of hardware.

  • It gives me an instruction on.

  • Then I basically went around parks in New York and subways, talking to strangers.

  • Here's documentation.

  • Video on Uh, yeah, it's It's a better experience of sound on, but check out my website and see like the nice documentation video.

  • But it was a great project.

  • I spoke to a lot of people down boundaries I never thought would have existed.

  • Yeah, and can you talk about So for someone who might be familiar with a little bit with machine learning, maybe has done some stuff, like on just either job script in the browser or using tensorflow fight on What?

  • What do they need to know where figure out to get it to run on a reverie pilot.

  • Sure, So this this raspberry pies using what's called the Coral http accelerator, which could do machine learning locally without even a cent inundated Internet and basically the FBI's super simple.

  • You just send this thing an image, and then it'll give you back detection boxes boxes where estimates a person is or a chair or a and you actually don't really know that much about machine learning to use this because it's a few few lines of python code where all that stuff is obstructed away and it's using a creek.

  • What's called a return Machine learning model, which has been trained to recognize about 70 objects.

  • But when the YOLO models Mobile Mobile now okay, it's mobile.

  • Yeah, but that's some research on something I didn't get to finish for.

  • This was being able to trade custom models to recognize specific objects, but I want to work on that.

  • On the summer.

  • People could basically create any kind of detection model and then upload it to the world.

  • They can create inhuman device That's best for that's what's best for them.

  • Personalized job.

  • Just you change your behavior now when you're not using this, Yeah, I mean, I start start asking liquor, he says.

  • They're going to get like, really nice just once is that I would have never I mean, I don't really to be honest, like it's just made me understand things about people, and I don't really use it that much anymore, but it's just changed my perception and, uh, yeah, yeah, just more more aware people on the street.

  • Yeah, so a little bit about you.

  • Okay, I'm Elizabeth, and I worked on a project where I looked for people in the Library of Congress who are featured in the New York Times has overlooked obituary future.

  • So I put together a day to, say, 16 people who are about half the people who have been recently given obituaries only for the first time.

  • So some people might be surprised to receive an obituary in The Times died.

  • Uh, So I decided to ask, like, in another institution, Have they been overlooked in there as well?

  • So I asked some questions, put together some data by, like, searching the online collection of the Library of Congress and used that kind of power that interaction here.

  • So the questions down here correspond to the button that you press to find out.

  • Like, are they in the library promise at all?

  • Do they have a name authority file?

  • Do they have a subject heading and you could see they start to fade away.

  • Kind of representing how it might be hard to find.

  • So that's like way like what it's like today.

  • And then I will start of a chrome extension, which is on my laptop over there, waiting for someone.

  • And then I'm interested in collaborating and like working on the data set with, I know, Can you tell us a little bit about the class?

  • Because this cost was a collaboration with the Library of Congress.

  • And did you get what back did you get from them?

  • What?

  • What?

  • Yeah, So some of us, I think you were in a class by called artists in the archive.

  • And, uh, he was an innovator and residents of the library Congress for the last year.

  • So through hair like this group of students got toe build projects on top of the collections and, uh, like the help of feedback I got was really great.

  • So, like, through that class, I got to talk with Metcalf, who is recommending officer at the library for, like, gender and sexuality.

  • So it was great to get her take on, like, how are you items in the library, like, encoded with data and how they find a bowl from her perspective, even got to go on a field trip to the library, which way.

  • Got to see a lot of things for you.

  • You can visit.

  • You should visit.

  • Anybody could just go in there and get a library card.

  • You could check out there compared to.