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  • >> Man, oh, man.

  • I know everybody's been looking forward to this, not supposedly seeing me, but it's the

  • end.

  • So I'm going to try to make this as quick as possible.

  • I don't know, I guess, will my slides show eventually?

  • I sure hope so.

  • Shout out to the AV people, because they're the best!

  • [Applause].

  • All right.

  • The slides are supposed to show any don't know.

  • I hope so, because I'm not going to be able to act this out the whole time.

  • There we go!

  • So, quickly, I mean, I realise that I saw a speaker yesterday, and she kind of like

  • matched her slides with her outfit, so I thought I might do the same.

  • And so, if everything goes right, I'm going to disappear!

  • And I'm going to re-appear again.

  • It's like camouflage!

  • Okay, it worked.

  • Anyway, I thought that was kind of funny.

  • And you're going to find out I'm a bit of a comedian.

  • We will start this with a joke.

  • Is that cool?

  • Can we have a joke?

  • All right.

  • How many JavaScripters here?

  • I mean, it's kind of funny that I don't see all the hands up, but that's cool.

  • So, imagine if naughty by nature went to the TC39 meeting.

  • Hip-hop hurray!

  • Hey - oh, you didn't like that.

  • It's all good!

  • Anyhow, we're going to get things cracking.

  • My name's Henri.

  • My last name isn't Helvetica.

  • I thought it sounded cool.

  • I did anyways.

  • People might recognise me from my nays which is the avatar that I kind of like to.

  • I'm from the greatest city on the planet called Toronto.

  • It's super multi-cultural, and I didn't realise it until I left, and I was like, man, Toronto

  • is actually amazing.

  • If you're in the area, check us out.

  • Here is something you may not have known about Toronto.

  • Anyone own a Commodore 64 back in the day?

  • Commodore was founded in Toronto.

  • No doubt.

  • So we're going to get things going.

  • Welcome to the Shape of the Web.

  • It's a talk I thought about a while back, and sort of just to talk about where the web

  • has gone.

  • A lot of good things have happened.

  • A lot of technology was used to make things really sort of like friendly and - like the

  • great user experiences that we try to create, but I also felt that the technologists that

  • were involved were amazing but some who may have been left behind so we will have a conversation

  • about that.

  • It's really just a conversation.

  • So let's get cracking.

  • Now, first off, I want to thank JSConf EU for having me.

  • I've been watching this conference from a distance on Twitter and look at the photos

  • like this is amazing!

  • Look at the screen!

  • No, seriously, look at the screen!

  • I mean, I only an-wide at home, and I think that this ratio is like 15:2 which is bananas.

  • Talk about neck pains.

  • DevTools would be amazing on this screen, by the way!

  • First of all, X, ten years, and I come from music, so I could appreciate what they've

  • done here, the set-up.

  • I mean, it's absolutely elaborate, but I love that they've done this for a tech conference,

  • so can we please give JSConf a round of applause as well!

  • [Applause].

  • All right, that's enough!

  • I'm going to get jealous!

  • So, they've been around ten years, and I was thinking to myself, like, you know, I was

  • kind of writing this talk up, adding some notes, ten years.

  • Where was I ten years ago?

  • Like I said, I came from music.

  • I was able to pull this photo out.

  • I used to do lectures with the Red Bull Music Academy which is actually based out of Germany,

  • and I was doing a lecture here with Flying Lotus, a big deal for me at the time, ten

  • years a week from today.

  • It's pretty on point and on brand.

  • But the web.

  • The web's actually 30 years old.

  • And I was thinking to myself, like, man, 30 years old, that's kind of like a long time.

  • And I don't know where you were 30 years ago, but I remember when I first accessed the web,

  • the first thing I thought of was this.

  • And I don't know how many of you were able to sort of like be around this time where

  • you had to get a modem, and you made those telephone sounds, and that stuff, just to

  • get on the internet?

  • But it was great because I discovered a lot of things, and there was one place I used

  • to hang out - who remembers newsgroups here?

  • There we go.

  • This is where I hung out a lot, rec.hipohop and yes, I'm going to talk about hip-hop with

  • people I don't know.

  • This is the first time you start to connect with people from all parts of the world who

  • had access to the net.

  • Another thing that I did, as I had more and more access, I used to use search engines,

  • like everyone else, and who remembers Alta Vista.

  • There we go.

  • I was a big fan.

  • When that vanished, I was so sad.

  • But, what I also did was I started to surf the web, and I was a big Netscape Navigator

  • and Communicator fan.

  • Actually, there were a few browsers around thereafter, but this is the one that I was

  • using, and the big part about this one is when it was released, this is what one of

  • the early quotes from Andriesson himself, "This software is going to to change everything."

  • And it did.

  • Another quote came, things started exploding with the invention of the browser because

  • suddenly the internet was accessible to the average person.

  • And I mean, average, we will say sort of like model-class person who had a computer and

  • a modem, but it definitely opened things up.

  • You started to have that delight and discovery that I like to talk about.

  • When Netscape came out, it was extremely popular, 65 million users in 18 months, and part of

  • the reason was the fact that as much as the early web was, like, text, it was very academic,

  • they were actually able to bring images into the fold here, and what then happened is that

  • when we were surfing the net, we were accustomed to the lay-out text, images.

  • It was reading the paper.

  • And believe it or not, there was debate as to whether or not they were going to bring

  • images on to the web.

  • Some mild arguments, and the belief was that if they brought images on, there would be

  • like this onslaught of pornography.

  • And I'm here to say that they were absolutely wrong.

  • Right?

  • But, the fact is, for real, though, they believe that by opening it up, adding some images,

  • and letting people sort of expert, it was going to drive the web forward, and it actually

  • did.

  • Now, today, we are 4.3 billion users online.

  • I think that's phenomenal, but believe it or not, there's still room to grow.

  • And, you know, you might wonder that's an explosive growth.

  • What sort of drove that?

  • Well, this is kind of it right here.

  • This young lady's on a mobile phone.

  • I believe this is nothing that the they expected to see at the time.

  • This is like mid-1990s.

  • Who thought you were going to have a mobile device and be able to surf the web just as

  • powerfully as they did back then?

  • So this has allowed us to do a lot of different things.

  • We've been able to be very productive in life.

  • So what have we been able to do with sort of like little friction?

  • Pretty much everything.

  • I mean, we can make money, we manage money online, we can go on a date, we can go buy

  • clothes.

  • We can actually go rent a car to take your date out.

  • We can order fish, we can listen to one of my favourite songs called Fish, and we could

  • actually get phishing emails from African Princes, right?

  • But all jokes aside, man, we can actually read comics and make them accessible, comic

  • books, shot-out to Jessica.

  • [Applause].

  • No doubt.

  • For all the people that were trying to bring online, we could actually go offline.

  • This is what technology has allowed us to do.

  • Which is absolutely needed.

  • By the way, I downloaded the offline map for Berlin because I was not going to pay those

  • fees.

  • But we could actually create music in the browser as well.

  • Shout-out to Live :JS in the building!

  • This is what the technology has allowed us to do, very important.

  • This is the shape of the web as we see it growing right before our eyes.

  • So, the technology has been extremely important in getting these sort of things done.

  • And this is where we are going to sort of like see even more technology allow us to

  • do greater things thereafter.

  • Now, what about the technologist?

  • We may have been playing some amazing chords on some of the devices that we've seen out

  • there, you know, from keyboards to the MIDI controllers, but, unfortunately, there's been

  • a little bit of discord as well, and we're going to get into a few items that have been

  • bothering me a little.

  • Let's talk about technology.

  • There's an ongoing refrain, we know exactly what is going on, and it saddens me.

  • I mean, you just need to open up Twitter and wait five seconds before it hits you, and

  • I think that's sad.

  • It's been long discussed, you know, what needs to be done to retain talent, to attract talent,

  • and we still go out and sort of like trip over some of the main issues.

  • I mean, what do they talk about?

  • What do women talk about when they leave the industry?

  • The lack of career growth, salary, poor management, and, you know, when I read poor management,

  • I know exactly what they mean.

  • That's just being polite.

  • And the other part is actually what scares me, because the other, I feel, I know exactly

  • what is going on, but, again, it's being polite and not calling people out, because other

  • to me means this.

  • It's not fit for print, but we know exactly what is happening.

  • To me, that's absolutely not the way or the shape of the web needs to take.

  • Further on I'm going to share a little story, something I did did a few years ago.

  • International men's day happens once a year, March 8th.

  • And I got together with some buddies, I'm like let's rap about this.

  • I want to put an event for women to come out and enjoy themselves and listen to other women

  • in the industry.

  • This goes back to something I tried about ten years ago in music.

  • I really wanted to do a show with female producers.

  • I work in a certain pack of sound, and I knew there were producers out there, but when I

  • went knocking on some doors, I couldn't find any sponsors, so it got a little tough, but

  • I never forgot that.

  • When I had an opportunity to do something again, I did.

  • So, every year we put together in event called IWDTO, International Men's Day, and this is

  • a picture of 2015, and we've been doing it for five years now.

  • On the right to left, we have Lisa, who worked at the White House, an Obama hire, by the

  • way.

  • The lady in the middle, someone who I look up to very much, she works in performance.

  • She goes by the name of Tammy Everts who works at SpeedCurve.

  • An amazing person.

  • You need to follow her if you can.

  • On the left, I'm not sure if she is here, Mina Markham.

  • I would be happy for her to come down and share her story.

  • The most important part is the fact that, like I say, we do this every year, and it

  • warms my heart to be able to help out in a way - I might not be the best ally - but I

  • feel I'm doing something to make things work.

  • Why do I want to to this?

  • I want to make sure that we have moments like these, you know?

  • [Applause].

  • Thank you, thank you, thank you.

  • Katie, we know exactly what happened there.

  • A great moment, even though shortly after we saw the trolls come out and sort of question

  • her.

  • Margaret Hamilton, as we know, coined the term "software engineering" but right there

  • she is sitting next to the stack of paper that was essentially her sort of like tracing,

  • or helping get the rockets up to the moon.

  • But one of my favourite photos is this one right here.

  • This is the Indian space research organisation.

  • And they're having a ball right there.

  • Why?

  • Well, they were the fourth team to ever get a satellite around Mars.

  • But they were the first to do it on the first try, not NASA, not the European Space Agency,

  • and not the Russian Space Agency, but the agency out of India.

  • As you can tell, the team is made up of several women.

  • It's actually a short documentary on that.

  • I will be more than happy to put the link out.

  • So I want to see of month of these happening, these moments taking place.

  • The big thing is that the comment thread between the three photos that I showed, I mean, they

  • all had CS backgrounds, degrees, and what not, which brings me to my next malaise, the

  • CS versus non-CS beef.

  • Any CS people in the building?

  • I mean, raise your hand.

  • I've got love for you.

  • You know what I mean?

  • How did this happen?

  • I really don't know.

  • But, I kind of got triggered by this one tweet, and this person's going to go unidentified,