Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • all stations on Dragon.

  • One minute until configure for terminal count.

  • 15 seconds.

  • Go for it.

  • Track.

  • It doesn't count out.

  • 543 Cheese one ignition.

  • This is Mission Control, Houston.

  • Good morning.

  • Good afternoon.

  • You are looking at a live view from the International Space Station.

  • Cameras pointed towards the pressurized mating adaptor on the other side, the space X crew dragon and the crew of Expedition 58 ready to close the hatch between the two vehicles.

  • This is the international Space station of Flight Control.

  • Room teams here are looking over the two astronauts on board the international space station.

  • You saw Anne McLean and David ST Jacques, um, to undergo the final procedures before closing the hatch flight director you're seeing at the front of your screen is Anthony Varia and Mike Jenson, the Capcom.

  • You may hear his voice up to the crew.

  • Ah, as they undergo these final procedures before closing the hatch to the space.

  • X Dragon has been quite a journey for the space X drag and of course, launching on Saturday morning in the wee hours, docking just over one day later and it's been enjoying, I guess over four days.

  • At this point aboard the International Space Station.

  • This is sort of the beginning of the end point.

  • Right after they closed, the hatch will begin depressurizing the space between are the actually closed?

  • Maura, few more hatches.

  • Ah, there's there's a space X dragon hatch, of course.

  • And then the hatch to ah, the international docking adapter and pressurized mating adaptor that are connecting space Sex dragon to the international Space Station.

  • They'll put depressurize the space between those two vehicles which will begin, um well, which will set up the crew dragon for an undocking.

  • Uh, later tonight and early tomorrow morning, Central and Eastern time each have to kind of quarter turn some matches.

  • Um, and learning excel the vibrations of return.

  • They might not, you know, if we're not lucky to have them open on the same box, and then the slap comes open.

  • So I thought maybe we could use captain tape to take these down and ah, divvied we copy and concur.

  • It is a good idea that kept on tape those down and your go.

  • Okay.

  • Capcom Mike Jenson Ah, speaking with David ST Jacques aboard the International Space station, Canadian Space Agency astronaut off Expedition 58.

  • He and NASA's and McClane are currently undergoing the final steps to close the hatch to what you're looking at here.

  • The inside of the space six crew dragon during its demo One mission.

  • The crew have been busy this past week unloading over £400 of cargo, which was largely composed of cruise supplies, things like clothes, food and other consumables, along with some radiation detectors and cold storage bags to return some science samples to the ground.

  • Afghan crew Dragon has the capability to return to Earth so that critical science could be analyzed by scientists on the ground.

  • The dragon has been packed again over this past week with a little more than £300 for that return to Earth that includes to cold storage bags for those of research samples.

  • So while Dr Space six Dragon has undergone a series of tests and inspections from both the crew and operators on the ground, flight controllers tested dragons, communication and power systems and conducted a survey of the outside of the spacecraft using the space station robotic manipulator unit and inspecting for any micro meteoroid debris and strikes that may have, um that may hinder any.

  • Ah, any undocking procedures?

  • Um, even getting a close look at some of the solar cells that are wrapping around.

  • I guess you can call the back of Dragon the dragon's trunk.

  • Crew members also took detailed photos of the dragons windows that will be analyzed along with the photos taken before launch.

  • And then some will be taken following spe Ashdown basically the entire cycle off.

  • Ah, this vehicle during this particular mission, demonstration one David ST Jacques Inside the space X dragon capsule.

  • This is a view from the capsule itself.

  • There's an anthropomorphic figure there on the left and named Ripley provide data about what the crew basically will experience during the lodge and docking and all the stresses that happen on the human body over this entire mission above ah, ST Jock's head, you can see a hatch that will be the hatch that will be the one to be closed between this space X crew dragon and the International docking adapter, where the vehicle is currently attached to the space station.

  • Now normally, during an operation with humans on board, which is of course, the intention of this vehicle.

  • This is a demonstration mission to test the capabilities of the vehicle.

  • First hatch closure will be a little bit closer to when the vehicle actually departs, but because this is an UN crewed vehicle could happen way ahead of time.

  • Ah, Hatch closure scheduled to occur just about 14 hours before the undocking time of 1:31 a.m. Central time.

  • 11:31 p.m. Pacific 2 31 Eastern tomorrow Once it does actually depart the station and will be broken up into three distinct phases.

  • First, the crew will work to close.

  • The hatch is which they're working on right now between both the dragon and the space station than teens will execute a number of checks and other procedures to prepare the dragon for undocking.

  • That includes the depressurization between the two vehicles.

  • The hatch closer procedures that you're saying right now are very similar to the ones you saw just a few days ago for hatch opening essentially just in reverse.

  • After everything is closed up, the crew will depressurize the vestibule.

  • This is the area between the dragon that I was talking about and the station ah and will be exposed to the vacuum of space following undocking.

  • Once the undocking command is sent, it actually takes about five minutes for everything to configure.

  • This includes of retracting the two umbilicals that have been providing dragon power and data to the station.

  • Of course.

  • Ah, meet sometime after docking.

  • Ah, Dragon relying on stations power through these past couple days to test its integration with the station.

  • Of course, one of the requirements for a successful long term mission for sending crew aboard the international space station.

  • Then once everything is complete, Dragon will actually separate from the docking port on the space station and fly free for the first time in five days.

  • Then it will fire his engines and begin flying away from the station to perform this maneuver.

  • It's actually a little bit different from the Soyuz vehicle, which the crew members have taken up for this mission.

  • Go for Emma's leapt up.

  • Quick, Go in.

  • Step 1.1.

  • And this is so with you.

  • And you have a go.

  • Thank you.

  • NASA's and McClane working through those hatch closure procedures.

  • Expedition 58 Flight engineer David saying jock, you see inside the crew dragon undergoing some of those same procedures.

  • Once they're finished with these, the dragon hatch will close and we're still remain attached to the International Space Station for space station for about the next 14 hours.

  • Ah, immediately after the hatch closing.

  • Undergoing some procedures to depressurize the vestibular in between station and dragon.

  • Get it ready for that on docking 14 hours from now.

  • But once it undocks is a little bit from the Soyuz.

  • Always has a springs to sort essentially push it away from the space station.

  • There were actually be an engine that fires.

  • It's ah, undock.

  • Burn one of two to get the vehicle away from station.

  • They happen fairly sequentially.

  • First, undocking bird actually initiates the physical separation.

  • That will be the undocking.

  • Um, Eric, at least complete the undocking of the crew dragon to the space station, and then another one will fire just about six seconds later.

  • Push it further away once a safe distance.

  • About 30 seconds after that, there will be the first departure burn one of many.

  • Ah, that will actually fly the crew dragon away safely away from the international space station and begin its descent towards the Earth.

  • That physical separation is ah, plan to occur at 1:31 a.m. Central time tomorrow morning to 31 a.

  • M eastern.

  • Then it will spend, ah the next few hours orbiting the Earth until finally splashing down in the Atlantic Ocean at 7:45 a.m. Eastern our central 8:45 a.m. Eastern again in the Atlantic Ocean just off the core coast of Florida.

  • Recovery teams will give me just a few kilometers away, ready to move in once they had here about a successful splash down and recover the vehicle very quickly after special splash down.

  • But for now, Expedition 58 crew members defeat ST Jacques and Anne McLean of NASA, uh, undergoing the final procedures to close the hatch between the crew dragon and the international space station.

  • You feel it too far.

  • Sample container go on to for grabs, sample container if you kick here or it's not being stowed with the other ones, it's going in.

  • And another CTV the other ones were in four or five and for the 30 so number 4030 this one's going into for two for six of the correct expected that is a formative correct.

  • 4246 Okay, good.

  • Start out.

  • Thanks.

  • Davidson Jock aboard the international space station again working through these procedures to close the hatch.

  • In the meantime, the International space station and crew Dragon still attached.

  • Ah, entering into an orbital sunrise.

  • Space station and crew Dragon flying 255 statute miles over the North Pacific Ocean.

  • Some of the views you're saying from the inside of the dragon capsule.

  • Ah, but ah, blown out now over.

  • Exposed due to the brightness.

  • But during the orbital sunrise, you were able to see some of the North Pacific as a past just south of the Gulf of Alaska.

  • Now heading on a south easterly course towards South America.

  • A little more about crew dragons journey so far.

  • Crew Dragon launched from the Kennedy Space Center on top of a Falcon nine rocket at 1:49 a.m. Central time on Saturday, March 2nd, just over a day later, a doctor, the forward end of the international space station where you're seeing it right now at 4:51 a.m. Central time, 5 51 eastern on Sunday March 3rd hatches were opened at seven or 7 a.m. Central, 807 Eastern Again, the crew have ah, Once after they opened the hatch, they went about a fairly normal week of scientific investigations.

  • But in the meantime, we're able to transfer £400 of cargo from the crew dragon to the space station and about £300 back.

  • Many items on board the crew dragon.

  • Many of them were consumables such as food.

  • They had other items, such as an orbital flight kit that included some patches and pins flown on the spacecraft Taken in and out.

  • Those will be returned back to Earth along with a few other items.

  • I should not divide ST Jacques floating in first and McClane right behind him.

  • And you're seeing ah, station Commander Ali Tonin.

  • Yanko.

  • Bring up the rear, which you're seeing now is a short lapse in communication between some of the video and audio feeds of the International Space station being provided right down here to the International Space Station flight control room.

  • That video and audio being fed through an array of satellites called T dress.

  • They're tracking and data relay satellites that air geosynchronous to the earth flying about 23 ish 1000 miles right overhead in, ah, in a way that covers most of the Earth and provides pretty consistent data and communication, too.

  • From the international space station down here to the ground.

  • Of course, they shared a resource and small gaps in between.

  • As we undergo these procedures for hatch closing inside here, all of the positions of the room are looking at various parts of the international space station.

  • Every, um, system you can think of is managed from here.

  • Your flight controllers, that air managing the, um basically the environmental and life support systems, some looking at thermal, some actually positioning the international space station itself, another to figure out where it's going and tracking its ah trajectory.

  • Over time you have officers here that are looking specifically at the crew dragon, and it's under great integration with the International Space station, making sure it's okay relaying that information to Space X flight control teams in Hawthorne, California All teams here are led by the flight director today during this shift of orbit to that's the second of three shifts that are staffing this room 24 hours a day Anthony Varia.

  • You're saying they're at the forward end of the screen as thespian Expedition 58 crew undergoes these final procedures for hatch closer.

  • You hear Mike Jenson right behind him.

  • He is the Capcom for today, relaying some of the information from all of the controllers here, through my gents in the cab, Come up to the crew members of Expedition 58 again a short laps and communications.

  • Ah, here.

  • But we once we regain them, we shouldn't have solid communications through the rest of the hatch closing And what the flight teams he referred to as egress procedures.

  • Basically the final moments before they close the hatch and leave the inside of the crew dragon for good before it finally undocks again.

  • That undocking time is scheduled for about 14 hours from now 1:31 a.m. Central time to 31 Eastern.

  • Though this is a human rated vehicle, no humans are on it, which is why we're closing.

  • The hatch is a little bit early, but of course, when space X dragon brings humans aboard, we expect that hatch closure to be there for a few time.

  • No need to have the astronaut sitting in there in place for 14 hours.

  • Of course, this is a historic moment, capturing the final moments of the astronaut in astronauts inside the crew Dragon, you're saying to beat ST Jacques on the left in the middle of NASA's and McClane.

  • And on the right, the commander of expansion 58 Oleg Kononenko of Rose Cosmos in the middle is the zero G indicator that was actually flown up on the crew dragon after launch and entering into an orbit ah on its way to the International Space Station.

  • The zero g indicator, which they're holding now, actually floated up, basically indicating when they were in zero G or microgravity environment and ready to begin this next steps towards flying towards the International Space Station.

  • That zero G indicator is scheduled to remain on board the International Space Station, while the crew dragon, um, will depart tomorrow morning.

  • Commander Ali Conan Django exiting the vehicle, returning to the International space station, Davidson jogging and McClane enjoying these final moments before they close the hatch to the vehicle where it will remain docked to the International Space Station for the next 14 hours until undocking tomorrow morning.

  • Central and Eastern Time and McLean, the second outside the vehicle.

  • Defeat saying job bringing up the rear.

  • He the first crew member to enter Crew Dragon aboard the space station.

  • TV ST Jacques, Initiating the command to officially close the hatch of the space X crew Dragon is the beginning end of the end for the crew dragon on his demo One mission.

  • And with that, the hatch, the hatch of the space six crew dragon is closed.

  • Hatch closed at 11:39 a.m. Central time.

  • 11:39 p.m. Eastern.

  • The space station at the time was 253 statute miles over the Pacific Ocean, just west off the coast of Mexico.

  • Confession Dragon has closed 17 39 GMT.

  • Copy Dragon had closed 17 39.

  • So you heard it confirmed from Ah Davies ST Jacques, aboard the International Space station, the first crew member to enter Dragon and the last to exit on its mission.

  • It's Demonstration one mission aboard the International Space Station.

  • He called it in Greenwich Mean time.

  • Of course, the time that they are operating aboard the International Space station will call at 11:39 a.m. Central, 12:39 p.m. Eastern Time Hatch is closed to the truth crew Dragon The beginning of the end of its mission on board the International Space Station and the conclusion of its demonstration.

  • One mission set to begin tomorrow morning.

  • Some final pictures taken inside the crew dragon and, of course, on the outside.

  • A little window peeking in and some of the sunlight from the earth below.

  • Still coming in through the windows of the space X crew dragon as it flies.

  • 253 statute miles over the Pacific again that time.

  • 11:39 a.m. Central time 11 Are 12:39 p.m. Pacific Earth Eastern.

  • Just under 14 hours from now, the dragon is scheduled to undock from the International Space Station That's scheduled actual physical separation at 1:31 a.m. Central time to 31 a.

  • M eastern.

  • So again, after that, undocking command is sent just under 14 hours From now, there will be an actual burn that occurs to physically separate the dragon from the International Space station.

  • A series of burns followed by a departure burn, one of many that will actually get the crew dragon safely away from the international space station outside the keep out sphere outside the approach lips oId These are sort of imaginary lines we draw around the international space station rules that help us to identify safety margins and operational procedures on.

  • And then, ah, the crew dragon will begin its descent towards the earth splashing down.

  • Scheduled to splash down in the Atlantic Ocean on tomorrow morning.

  • Scheduled for 7:45 a.m. Central 8:45 a.m. Eastern.

  • You're looking at the International Space Station Flight control room teams here looking at some of the systems aboard the International space station and working through the procedures with the crew aboard the International Space Station to close a series of hatches.

  • Of course, the crew dragon hatch ah was closed at 11:39 a.m. Central time, 11:39 p.m. Eastern.

  • That is one of several hatches that is to be closed throughout these procedures that the astronauts will continue to conduct throughout the day getting ready for an undocking tomorrow morning where their main priority will be monitoring the procedure.

  • The dragon I hatch is docked.

  • There are a few hatches in between the Dragon hatch and the inside of the International space station.

  • The dragon itself is Dr the International Docking Adapter that is attached to the front of the pressurized mating adaptor.

  • And those two components are on the very front of the international space Station.

  • After the hatches closed between the dragon and the International docking adapter, defeat ST Jacques working to close the hatch from the pressurized mating adaptor toothy international docking adapter.

  • That's that small component you see on the other side of the hatch that David Sandrock is working on now.

  • After working for you through these procedures, he's expected to close the hatch to the pressurized mating adaptor in between the pressurized mating adaptor and the station itself in the know to harmony vehicle, our module of the International Space station.

  • No to being where some of the sleeping quarters of the International Space station are.

  • For those tuning in, you're looking at a live view from the International Space Station into the pressurized mating adaptor and the international docking adapter, where you see a white circular hatch that is space excess crude dragon.

  • The hatch was closed just a few minutes ago at 11:39 a.m. Central 12:39 p.m. Eastern two DVD We've been watching over your shoulder and, uh, also noticed in the vestibule area that the I am the duct restraint, which is ah, uh, figure one.

  • It's a bit of Velcro and claws that the hold the duck in place tucked in place is a little bit loose, and they're concerned about it.

  • Maybe drifted into something and catching something, wondering if you can get in there and find a way to kind of tighten it down a bit more or or get it, Uh, uh sunk up against the the outer hole a bit or closely.

  • Exactly what you mean.

  • This is mission control.

  • Houston, you were just hearing ah, the ground teams here in the International Space Station Flight control room.

  • Communicating with the vid saying Jack aboard the international space station as he undergoes the procedure is to close the hatch between the international docking adapter and the pressurized mating adaptor.

  • This is the second hatch, um, in between that hatch that you see right at the back of the screen there, the circuit, the white circular hatch.

  • That's the hatch to the crew.

  • Dragon closed just moments ago at 11:39 a.m. Central teams here helping him to troubleshoot some of the techniques that are needed to successfully close the hatch.

  • One of the many procedures that follow the hatch.

  • Closure of crew Dragon.

  • Essentially getting Thea getting everything set up for a successful undocking tomorrow morning that on docking time, scheduled at 1:31 a.m. central to 31 a.

  • M.

  • Eastern station, Houston onto for divvied no response required.

  • Also is happy with what they're seeing in the video.

  • Cappie Thumb, this is Mr Control Houston.