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  • three.

  • It is 8:55 a.m. eastern on January 29th and you're looking at a live view of the Falcon nine as it awaits its target at 907 a.

  • M.

  • Eastern Time launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

  • Good morning from Space X headquarters here in Hawthorne, California My name is Lauren Lions, and I'm an engineer on our Starling team here.

  • It's basics and welcome to our live webcast of our fourth Starling commission.

  • To date, we have launched three satellites of 60 Sorry, sorry.

  • Three sets of 60 Starling satellites, one set back in May of 2019 another in November and the most recent, just a few weeks ago, on January 6th.

  • This network of relatively small but advanced satellites is designed to bring high speed, low leighton see broadband Internet to people all over the globe.

  • By design, the satellites will be able to service areas of the globe where connective ity has been unreliable, too expensive or completely unavailable.

  • For those of you who follows basics closely, you know, we successfully completed an in flight demonstration of our crew Dragon launch escape system about a week and 1/2 ago on January 19.

  • This test was the last major milestone before we slide NASA astronauts to the space station for the first time on our crew Dragon spacecraft later this year.

  • This is the mission known as Demo to the rocket you see on your screen.

  • Right there also played a role in these efforts.

  • Specifically, this booster previously launched the first crew Dragon spacecraft minus the astronauts, of course, enlarged it to the International Space station for NASA back in March of last year, this was a mission known as Demo one.

  • Now, today we're going to attempt to recover this Falcon nine first Age for the third time, this time on the drone ship.

  • Of course, I still love you, which is currently stationed about 350 nautical miles off the eastern coast of Florida.

  • Will be attempting to recover.

  • Will also be attempting to recover both faring pale Perillo faring halves today during our using our two faring recovery vessels, Mystery and Miss Chief.

  • So we likely won't see those who use live but will provide updates on progress on that recovery as they become available.

  • So we're continuing to countdown to liftoff.

  • But if for some reason we have to call a hold on today's launch, we do have a backup opportunity on Thursday, January 30th at 8:45 a.m. Eastern.

  • But at this time, all systems are go for an on time liftoff.

  • My name is Jesse Anderson, and I'm a lead manufacturing engineer here at Space six.

  • Right now we are looking at a live view of Falcon nine on our Pad Space Launch Complex 40 or slick 40 in Cape Canaveral, Florida Falcon nine stands 70 meters tall, and when it's fully fueled, it'll hold just over a £1,000,000 of propellant that the vehicle will burn through in less than three minutes after lift off, we prepped Falcon nine for launch in our hangar at the base of the pad, and upon completing final checkouts, Falcon nine rolled out to the pad with the starling payload and went vertical.

  • Early this morning, the chief engineer held a technical pole at T minus one hour to confirm no significant issues, and launch director held a propellant load and launch Go no go.

  • Pull at T minus 38 minutes to ensure all teams were good to begin the fuelling process.

  • Falcon nine has been loading propellants since t minus 35 minutes, and currently our rocket grade kerosene or RP one is nearly fully loaded on the first stage, which is the bottom 2/3 of the vehicle that you see there on your screen.

  • That first stage, which previously flew during Space six's demo One mission for NASA as well as the Radar SAT consolation mission in June of 2019 is responsible for accelerating the vehicle through the Earth's atmosphere to the edge of space with the help of nine Merlin engines.

  • Above that first stage is the second stage, which has a single Merlin vacuum, or EM back engine, which ignites after the first stage separates.

  • The second stage is what will carry the starling satellites to an altitude of 290 kilometers above the earth's surface.

  • At this time, second stage is fully fueled, and liquid oxygen loading is currently underway On both first and second stage.

  • The stack of 60 satellites is safely enclosed inside of the 17 foot diameter payload fairing, which is the pointed in closer on the very top of the rocket, and we've got a nice view of the satellites stacked up right there thes air flat satellites so you can see that there on your screen.

  • And once we reach the vacuum of space, we will deploy the faring as these second states continues on its journey to its final orbit.

  • So far, weather is looking good during our launch window for an on time launch, but we'll be keeping an eye on on this all the way down to T minus zero.

  • The Air Force range is prepared to support today's mission.

  • Waters are clear of any ships in the range continues to ensure the safety of our launch.

  • The vehicle satellites, weather and range are all looking good for an on time lift off just a few minutes from now.

  • Today, most of your satellite Internet service is come from geo.

  • Stationary satellites are geo sets.

  • A single geo sat wolf served a fixed but brought area and is typically placed.

  • About 35,000 commoners are higher above the earth.

  • Now.

  • One of the main draw box of that high altitude is high Leighton see or delay in that signal that's provided because they're so far above the earth.

  • Starting on the other hand is a constellation of multiple satellites that orbit the planet, but it much lower at about 550 kilometers.

  • Because of this low orbit Leighton see, it's much lower than with satellites in geo stationary orbit.

  • This enables Starling to deliver service service is like seamless video calls that are usually not possible on other satellite Internet systems.

  • And because Starling satellites fly in a global consolation, we can bring high speed Internet's of places that previously had terrible service or no service at all.

  • Some of the most exciting opportunities for Starling are rural or remote locations where traditional fiber or cable just isn't practical.

  • And Starling can also deliver high speed Internet locations where fiber and cable aren't possible at all, such as a cruise ship or an airplane building.

  • A consolation that can provide this level of service is incredibly challenging, but we're making steady progress towards that goal with every starling watch and one quick note.

  • During our last lunch, we mentioned that we were experimenting with a darkening treatment on one of our satellites.

  • This is part of an effort to minimize reflections from the satellites that may be distracting to some astronomers during their observations of the night sky.

  • It takes a few weeks for those satellites to reach their final orbit destination, so we don't have the results of that dark SAT experiment just yet.

  • But we'll be sure to share what we've learned as the data becomes available.

  • We are currently a little bit over four minutes from lift off, and Falcon nine is now moving into the final stages of the countdown.

  • AT T minus seven minutes.

  • Engine show began.

  • This is where we allow a small amount of the super chilled liquid oxygen to flow into the Merlin turbo pumps prior to the full flow of liquid oxygen into the vehicle, and that's to avoid any shocks to the system.

  • Liquid oxygen is also what's creating the white puffs around Falcon nine.

  • We continue to load super chilled liquid oxygen or locks into the stage until just before liftoff, and when that super chilled locks comes in contact with the ambient air around it, it creates those white clouds surrounding the vehicle that you can see there on your screen.

  • And just a few moments ago, around T minus 4.5 minutes, the transporter Erector retracted away from the rocket slightly.

  • And this provides clearance for Falcon nine.

  • Lift off.

  • The first and second stages are both nearly fully loaded with £1 million of kerosene fuel and liquid oxygen.

  • First stage should finish proper loading at T minus three minutes and second stage at T minus two minutes at T minus 60 seconds.

  • To be sure to listen into the call out that Falcon nine is in startup.

  • This means that the Rockets autonomous internal flight computers have taken over the launch countdown.

  • This booster has launched from our 39 a launch pad, our Vandenberg Launchpad, and it is now getting ready for lift off from our slick 40 launchpad.

  • Today the Starling payload continues to be healthy.

  • The Falcon nine team is tracking no issues on the rocket, whether it's still looking good and the Grange is green for launch.

  • So let's listen into the last few minutes of the countdown stage to lock closed, Closed out, ground us Close.

  • Starting.

  • How can I start up complete?

  • No, these go for launch.

  • T minus 30 seconds.

  • Demon.

  • 15 seconds.

  • Nine.

  • Hey!

  • Seven five or three, two one!

  • Yeah!

  • The pitching down range.

  • It is tea plus 45 seconds.

  • And we've just had a nominal lift off of our Falcon nine vehicle carrying our starling payload on its way to its targeted orbit in just about 20 seconds.

  • Coming up here, we will be passing through Max talking, not a supersonic.

  • That is the maximum aerodynamic pressure that the vehicle will see, which is the largest structural load that the vehicle sees throughout.

  • A cent vehicle is experiencing maximum aerodynamic pressure, and we've just heard that call out for Max.

  • Q.

  • Coming up next in about a minute, will be three events back to back, starting off with Mico, or main engine cutoff, followed immediately by stage separation.

  • And this is where the first stage separates from the second stage and then followed by SCS one, which is second engine startup and Beckett in Jill.

  • We should be able to see all three of those events live on your screen, but right now we've got an awesome view looking after on the vehicle with the earth in the background.

  • Now, if you're just now joining us for about 30 seconds away from Mico main engine, cut off stage separation and s E s one or second engine start one.

  • There's that main engine cutoff stage separation confirmed stage separation for state Separating from second stage on your left screen and on the right second engine startup.

  • That's that end back engine on our second stage and there's that bright red glow on the engine.

  • So now coming up in about 20 seconds is faring deploy.

  • And as Lauren mentioned earlier, we will be attempting to catch both payload faring halves on a recovery vessels, mystery and mischief.

  • Well, well, it will be unlikely that we will see these live on the Webcast will bring you updates as they become available.

  • You can also check into our social media for updates as well during separation confirmed and there's that call up.

  • Four bearing separation there is faring deploy.

  • You could see that on your right screen.

  • Faring has are now making You could see that on your screen.

  • Actually, the pairing has air making their way back to Earth and hopefully we can catch those on our recovery vessels.

  • A less Bermuda.

  • Okay, so we have on both sides of your screen here.

  • We got stage one on the left and stage two on the right.

  • So a lot of really cool stuff coming up all at once or in rapid succession here in the next few minutes on the left side, we're going to see on the stage one side of things is at about T plus six minutes and 24 seconds more or less, you're gonna hear the call out and hopefully visually see the stage one entry burn.

  • That's where we re ignite three of those Merlin one D engines.

  • And that allows theseventies Sorry, the first age to slow down as it re enters.

  • The upper part of the state is on a nominal trajectory.

  • All right, As you just heard, Stage two is on a nominal trajectory.

  • That's really cool.

  • Meanwhile, stage one is coasting down, getting ready for that entry burn.

  • That burns gonna last just under 20 seconds after that entry burn staged, one will continue to coast down towards the drone ship.

  • And at about T plus eight minutes or so, you're going to hear the call out for the landing burn that is, will reignite a single Merlin one d engine that center engine E nine, and that slows the vehicle down to zero velocity, and hopefully you'll see a cool image of its standing right up on the drone ship.

  • Meanwhile, Stage two continues to perform nominally wearing that em back is at full power now, right after the stage one landing.

  • About 20 seconds later, you're gonna hear the call out for Seiko one.

  • That second engine cut off one.

  • That is where we cease to burn the second state engine and takes us into our first coast face.

  • That stage two engine is burning with more than £200,000 of thrust as it takes that stack of 60 starling satellites to its first parking orbit.

  • Stage one entry start up.

  • All right.

  • You see that entry burn?

  • As it started, we lost the image, but hopefully you'll come back that intra Verma's just under 20 seconds long.

  • Meanwhile, stage T shirt Stage two continues to burn, and we just heard the call out that the entry burn on stage one has concluded.

  • Stage two continues on a nominal trajectory.

  • So we're a little bit under a minute from the landing burns.

  • Start me Watch Stage two, as you just heard continues on a nominal trajectory stage.

  • Want trans sonic and just under 15 seconds.

  • Stage one should start that landing Burn stage one wanting to go back, right.

  • That lending burn is currently going.

  • Unfortunately, we don't have the video from the vehicle, But we do have the judge one long and deploy state.

  • Susan.

  • Terminal guidance.

  • Yes.

  • Awesome.

  • That's the third landing of this booster.

  • Second time landing on.

  • Of course, I still love you any second.

  • Now we should be seeing Seiko one.

  • That is where that second stage engine will cut off that animation there.

  • But let's still listen out for it, all right?

  • As you just heard, second engine shutdown escape expected, and we got confirmation that we're in a good orbit.

  • All right, so we're not gonna enter a coast face.

  • We're gonna take a break.

  • We'll be leaving you with an animation that shows where we are in the coast phase.

  • And we'll be back at about T plus 45 minutes for a second stage.

  • Relate, followed by another brief coast and then payload.

  • Hopefully, we'll better bring you that payload.

  • Deploy live on the webcast, so we'll see you back here in just over 35 minutes.

  • It was new Finland OS Bermuda Expected No, Don't.

  • Okay.

  • L always do.

  • Filling expected.

  • Why the way later?

  • It was good.

  • Really?

  • L o s go telling you expected.

  • Hey, Wes, we've gotten exciting update As you could see on your screen, we were able to catch one of the fairing have so far This one is on mystery and we're still waiting to hear if we are able to catch the one on this Chief second bearing half so exciting news so far this morning we will bring you updates on mystery and that second hair faring half as soon as we get more information Welcome back to the Webcast for StarLink way had some exciting news that we did catch one of the fairing halves on Mystery.

  • Unfortunately, we were unable to catch the second faring half on Miss Chief.

  • It was really, really close.

  • Looks like it did have a soft water landing, so we will be pulling that bearing half out of the water and hopefully we're using it again in the future.

  • Eso coming up next in about 30 seconds from now is will be SCS to followed by Seiko too.

  • And that second engine start and second engine cutoff.

  • Now this burn will last just one second long.

  • It's one of the shortest burns that we do, And that's because we're so close to our targeted orbit that it one second one second burn will get us there.

  • Um, just fine so that it's coming up shortly.

  • In about five seconds or so again, it might not look like much because it is a one second burn.

  • Hopefully, we'll get that live you and we've had confirmation of SCS to and Seiko Tune now just waiting for confirmation of good orbit.

  • And we've had confirmation of good orbit.

  • So now that second stage is in a good orbit and making its way to its final exertion for satellite.

  • Of course, there's that call out now that we're in a good orbit will be coasting for the next 15 minutes or so.

  • So we'll be back at T plus one hour in one minute for payload to play us Re have expected.

  • Come on.

  • Hey, West has made you welcome back to the Webcast for Starling.

  • If you've watched our previous starling Webcasts, you're aware that our satellites are flatly packed with no dispenser and that the deployment sequence.

  • Look, it's a little bit different from what you'll see.

  • On a typical watch, the satellites will slowly disperse upon deployed, and they meet even bump into one another, which is to be expected.

  • The satellites were designed with this in mind, and we are less than one minute away from deployment of the Starling satellites.

  • Okay, so after the satellite's deploy, they are going to overtime separate from one another and use their onboard Krypton ion thrusters in order to space themselves out, insert into their orbital planes and raise their altitude to their operational orbit of 550 kilometres.

  • Insurgent organ orbit, if you remember today, is about 290 kilometers above the Earth.

  • That beautiful view.

  • Okay, well, one of the animation school, too, but hopefully we'll get back to those live used for space.

  • Startling tension Rod separation confirmed.

  • Okay, we just heard the call up.

  • That separation has been confirmed.

  • Let's see if we can get another view.

  • That would be really cool.

  • It should be coming up.

  • There we go.

  • That's gorgeous.

  • That's 60 Starling satellites successfully separating from stage two and that beautiful planet there is the planet that those satellites are gonna provide Internet service, too, which is super, super exciting.

  • And with that that brains are Webcast to a close.

  • We had a successful mission.

  • We had a great stage one ascent, completing the hat trick.

  • Launching from three separate launch sites, we had the third recovery of this booster.

  • Stage two delivered Starling to its operation or two.

  • It's targeted orbit.

  • And as you just saw, we successfully separated those 60 StarLink salary satellites.

  • So oh, and also we caught a fairing that's a big deal super awesome, and were able to see it in the daytime, which is even more cool.

  • So a big thank you to the 45th Space Wing for range Safety and to the FAA for licensing today's successful watch.

  • We'd also like to thank all of you.

three.

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