Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • get a good get getting by.

  • The sound of the collapse sounds very good.

  • Judging by the sound of the collapse, it sounds very good.

  • Did you hear that?

  • The me I know it was the guy backstage.

  • Do it again.

  • Do it again.

  • I just wanted applause.

  • Huh?

  • You will.

  • Five of you are.

  • Well, what's the matter?

  • Was the last.

  • The last stop was good, right?

  • You're you're feeling energized.

  • You feeling inspired?

  • Amazing.

  • My name is Tae GIs.

  • That's pronounced like contagious.

  • But don't worry, I'm not contagious.

  • I'm not going to give you anything.

  • Besides, hopefully a good talk.

  • Um, and I have to say, I love this conference.

  • I was here for C.

  • S S Khan and James Caan yesterday Learned a ton.

  • I learned a ton debugging performance.

  • It's all here.

  • Can we hear it?

  • For the organizer's of Js Conti Budapest.

  • Absolutely incredible.

  • And also and also the city.

  • The city is really beautiful.

  • If you live here who I'm jealous.

  • I'm jealous.

  • Um, so as I said, my name stages.

  • Contagion is kind of like a way to remember it, because it's a It's a bit of a different Indian name, but really?

  • At this point, you can just call me that joke guy from yesterday.

  • Ah, yesterday had the party.

  • It's like and so Yes, Yes, I'm hilarious.

  • Uh, I work in Germany at a company called County Ammo.

  • And we you know, the marketing way.

  • We like promoter Selves.

  • We accelerate data access.

  • Just means we help people understand their data and do all kinds of cool data science.

  • The things, um but really, for me, what I love the most about my work is thes people.

  • Oh, my God.

  • This is my team.

  • And they're some of the brightest, funniest, smartest.

  • Oh, my God.

  • I love them very much.

  • I'm very happy to work with them.

  • And, you know, I get to come here and tell you about how wonderful they are, but that, unfortunately, is not what this talk is.

  • About three set instead that talks about server lis service.

  • Honey, you've heard of server lys.

  • Um wow, everybody.

  • So nothing new will be learned here.

  • It I'm just kidding.

  • Um, we're gonna talk about, so I'm gonna look at some adoption.

  • Some use it.

  • Uh, well, look at what it means and why.

  • I think it is absolutely revolutionary, and I mean that the stock is called legendary.

  • Lamb does for reason.

  • Ah, but before we get into that, let's kind of look at some facts and figures.

  • These are from surveys.

  • The citations on the bottom left.

  • I'd encourage you to go look it out.

  • Look it up.

  • Um, and according to the new stack, some time ago, about 78% of participants in the survey wanted to adopt server lis into their ecosystem into their internal service architecture.

  • 70%.

  • Which means by now they may have already another.

  • Interesting to cystic is 75% of the problem space has been penetrated by service in the last 18 months or so, and that is really, really, really exciting.

  • It very quickly overtook, um, the prior art.

  • If you will containers as a service and it's it's growing very fast.

  • Um, and these are just numbers.

  • But there are real world use cases where Sir Valises doing amazing things and one such use cases by one of the biggest brands in the whole world.

  • Coca Cola reduced their operating costs by about 65% on service, and how they did that is they had these these vending machines that were like 10 to 12 years old and they would have to send some some telemetry.

  • They have a sense of information about like, Are they enough drinks and stuff to Coke?

  • Now these up until 2016 around on Amazon's Easy to on cost about $12,864 a year.

  • Okay, um, after moving to serve Earless, Coca Cola pays 4490 roughly at the time of the case study.

  • For you, that's That's a 65% reduction.

  • And if they could serve 30 million requests at one time at the time of publishing of this study, very, very, very interesting.

  • Second, if you've ever played or heard of final fantasy score, Enix is the company behind some of the world's greatest.

  • MMORPG is massively multiplayer online role playing games, and they could have millions of players on at the same time.

  • And what players like to do at massive scale is take screenshots, so they have an image processing function that would process thes screenshots.

  • Now, um, processing these screenshots, especially under heavy load, would use that used to take several hours after moving to serverless thes.

  • Take a little over 10 seconds and more than that.

  • Bacon comfortably do this with traffic spikes of over two times.

  • So if there's a gaming tournament and there's like millions of people online, this dysfunction to process the images eats it for breakfast.

  • Um, lastly, if you've ever heard of a used a WiFi router in your entire life, there's a good chance it with a Thompson one.

  • And Thompson router is one of the world's biggest brands for routers is able to process 4000 events per second on server Lys.

  • Um, what's really impressive about this is even, you know, under very heavy conditions there's no or minimal, probably no data loss.

  • Um, but for me, and this is what I want to focus on today, is they scheduled five months to get this into production, according to the report.

  • And, you know, if you're at the scale of Thompson, five months is a really short time.

  • I've heard people say that in larger companies things just take longer.

  • This more meetings, more planning whatsoever.

  • So five months is ambitious.

  • Thompson actually ended up moving this thing to serve a list two months ahead of schedule.

  • Two months ahead of server Lis is is you're able to get up and running really, really fast.

  • And so I tell you all these things to tell you it's here and it's big and people are talking about it.

  • But don't take my word for it.

  • I think one of my friends, Natter said it best.

  • He just says this server Lis is the future.

  • And so if it is the future and we're all kind of going there anyway, let's let's spend 30 minutes talking about it in a little bit of detail.

  • Uh, what is it?

  • What is service serve Earless in quotes?

  • Um, it's a loaded term, right?

  • It could mean functions, which we'll talk about what it could just mean.

  • Like static Web sites jam stack things.

  • Um, I want to make a point here.

  • That may be controversial, but you know what?

  • It's just it's you love me, you know, it's fine.

  • Whatever.

  • Um, I think just the word server Lis is kind of a life like in English.

  • That's called a miss No more miss, as in not not quite no more as a name now in software engineering, naming things is hard, and I think we may have missed Sir Phyllis because I was talking to my wife about it.

  • She's, you know, she studies law and isn't very involved in tech, and it sounds like, Well, there's no servers at all, which is a huge life.

  • And so I had kids.

  • I'd invite you to consider this.

  • It's a wireless charger.

  • Also kind of a life.

  • Um, and so server, This is kind of like that.

  • It means it doesn't mean there are no servers.

  • It means that they're not your problem.

  • You do what you love.

  • You get to focus on building the apse, the experiences you absolutely love, and you pay Amazon or site Ornella fire one of these some amount of money, or use their free here and your stuffs magically in the cloud server.

  • Lis, you can quote me on this server.

  • Lis brings the cloud down.

  • Um, but But why?

  • And there's a number of reasons why service is so popular and we'll go through them.

  • I think you know them.

  • They're they're not like rocket science or mind blowing.

  • But as I just said, you can focus on the things you love you.

  • You delegate the responsibility of servers to someone else.

  • So you write your job a script, you write your python.

  • If you're into that and and you put it in the cloud and the concerns of provisioning the server setting up the run time putting, getting it up, all of that you don't deal with.

  • If for some reason your server dies and you need to send traffic to a different machine, for whatever reason handled for you, that's already like I can breathe a little bit easier.

  • There were three scale like if if, for example, you your square enix and there's a huge gaming tournament, you don't have to think about scaling vertically by adding Maur memory or, you know, hardware throwing hard with the problem or scaling horizontally by adding more servers in your cluster, you just it doesn't matter.

  • You create the software you know in love and these air kind of the three tenants of service.

  • But I invite you to consider one more, and that is this one.

  • You see most tech conferences.

  • I think it may be fair to say all tech conferences air on this spectrum of technology and community.

  • Um and James Caan family conferences that I've been to usually lean a little bit more towards community.

  • And if we're in community, we need to talk accessibility in case that's not big enough.

  • Accessibility.

  • I think server Lis makes the Web.

  • So the clouds so accessible, um, that everybody can play and this is huge.

  • You see, I come from I was born in a country that is poor, it's a developing country.

  • India.

  • In case you were wondering, I love the food.

  • It's amazing, but the country is, is is it's growing right, and the prior art of service means you have to have some type of server means.

  • You have to either get shared hosting if if money's tight or you get a virtual private server or a bare metal server.

  • Now with these, there's money involved.

  • And sometimes for some communities, this money is too much.

  • It's not as accessible with Lambda Server.

  • Lis helps these communities see.

  • India, I think, is home to some of the most brilliant minds on the face of the planet.

  • And if you need evidence of that, don't you don't have to look very far.

  • CEO of Google, CEO of Microsoft So needle Pyatt, Facebook.

  • There's react.

  • India is happening right now, and there's a whole bunch of them ready to learn and grow.

  • The problem is, the cloud is not accessible because you pay so much for a server.

  • It's unbelievable.

  • Lambda has this pricing model that allows people from these communities to put stuff in the cloud.

  • You have an idea, put it in there, and how that's possible is because Lambda as our functions, they're just function.

  • There's an excellent talk yesterday on functional programming, their functions and as we saw functions, what do they do?

  • You write them, they start, they do a job.

  • They run to completion, they finish their turn a value.

  • That's it.

  • In a perfect world, your functions, they're stateless.

  • Or doesn't the clothes over their own state?

  • They have no side effects, and they're pure meaning.

  • For any given input, they give you the same output without side effects.

  • They're predictable.

  • If they're predictable, they're testable.

  • You can unit test them and make sure they behave the way you won't look too.

  • If they're testable, they're scalable, meaning you can run 50 different versions of the same function.

  • They do the same thing, and if they're infinitely scalable, you can go really, really, really far.

  • And so if the functions are invoked, it presents an entirely different pricing model.

  • Upright.

  • Previously, you would pay monthly for server people.

  • Use it.

  • People don't I don't care.

  • I'm losing 350 euros a month is paying for a server.

  • I'm wildly unpopular.

  • I'm paying for a server.

  • I can't pay my rent, but maybe someone will use it and it'll catch on.

  • I'll just keep hoping.

  • Pay for this.

  • I lose money a whole year with Lambda you pay for each time your function is invoked.

  • And I think that's a game changer.

  • I really do, because if no one uses your thing, you pay nothing on some wood.

  • Some providers, if one person uses it, you pay.

  • I think, like 15 millionth of a dollar.

  • You pay for invocations and you pay for compute time.

  • We'll talk more about that.

  • It's it's almost free and it's almost free.

  • No matter how much money you or your country has, you can put stuff in the flat thing.

  • That's incredible.

  • And so I thought I could show you some examples if the Internet cooperates.

  • If it doesn't, you know, uh, we'll see what happens.

  • And so here's an example.

  • Here's a serverless function in JavaScript because it's Jace conference.

  • I'm I'm I'm sending So I have a request response.

  • Ah, set of arguments and I'm sending through the response a heading off the current date and time.

  • Uh, let's put this in the cloud.

  • I want you to pay attention because this is super sophisticated to put stuff in the cloud on surveillance.

  • I'm using a provider as there's others, but I find this and I just enter one commend literally one comment and it says, Okay, I'm deploying this function.

  • Damp ban.

  • It's done, uh, I open it.

  • And so what happens is that functions called when I open the function and it returns a value to the brother.

  • This calls the function that calls the function.

  • If I reload the page, it calls the function every time you see, and so I'm kind of running up a huge bill hereby reloading this page.

  • But it's not very much.

  • I'm sure I can afford it.

  • I'm actually on their free tier, so I'm sure I could afford it.

  • Um, but another case for server list If you wanna get creative, is this thing which will automatically give you a randomly generated thinking emoji on every invocation?

  • This one apparently is huge.

  • But every time you reload the page, you just get a new one, because the function is called on many.

  • I could do this all day.

  • Okay, moving on.

  • Um, So what we saw was cool.

  • I don't know why my doc is showing like apple.

  • If you're watching, please quality.

  • The pricing for that, though, is that much you pay for each time it's invoked.

  • You pay that much and you pay for the amount of gigabytes seconds you use.

  • And this is on Amazon Web service.

  • That's that's crazy.

  • But I spend a lot of time in a lot of tech.

  • Conference is talking to a lot of people about things, about service, about CSS, about life and love, and Romeo and Juliet, Whatever.

  • Um, and as with everything, there are concerns.