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  • has up.

  • As Patrick said, my name is Ted.

  • So it should come as no surprise that I'm giving you a ted talk.

  • Um, but the, um when I really thought about this, uh, my story actually begins way before, uh, I was born, and it starts actually with Hiroshima Post for Japan and my parents, they wanted a better life, and they went to America, and they wanted to be integrated with America.

  • So by the time their second child came along, which was me, they said, we want to speak on Lee in English with him.

  • And so I learned English really well, right?

  • But I didn't learn a lick of Japanese.

  • So then when the chance came finally toe to reconnect with Japan, I thought that would be great.

  • And because every day I was reminded that I was Japanese and I ran right on Kota monarchy.

  • I remember, by soaring feeling and feeling really proud.

  • Uh, despite being in the 98% white neighborhood, Um, I remember just feeling so proud to be Japanese, and so my company said, Hey, you're Japanese.

  • I said I am.

  • And they said Okay, great.

  • We have a great marketing roll.

  • You can lead marketing up for us in Japan.

  • And so I said, That's great.

  • And there was only one issue, though, is it?

  • When I came, no Japanese thought I was Japanese.

  • I felt not included.

  • And so, um, I really thought about this and I said, You know what?

  • I have a special superpower, and my superpower is If I just don't talk, I can just fade into the hole and to being just another Japanese.

  • So I remember actually was writing the Shinkansen.

  • And, uh And then there's old lady heard all these fluent English speakers going and talking, and she's like turning around on her in her seat and she's looking for for who is that foreigner who's speaking fluent Japanese.

  • I mean, full in English, and she could just see a sea of Japanese.

  • And I'm like, I just went silent and then she just she she went away.

  • But But then I said, You know what?

  • This doesn't really work.

  • I'm just going to focus on my work.

  • And so we were managed to turn around, Ah, troubling digital phone company Contact digital phone, and we went from number four to number two in our marketplace.

  • Um, hard work since here work.

  • And then the corporate headquarters called and they said, You know what?

  • You guys did a great job.

  • We want todo come to our global competition.

  • There's 12 teams and, um, there were 10 American teams and you team and by the Japanese team.

  • We really tried hard, and we actually got the number one price.

  • So you know what the Americans were like.

  • Yeah, high fives.

  • That's great.

  • And my Japanese team was shocked and disappointed.

  • They were shocked and disappointed.

  • And what for me, was the career highlight?

  • Until that time, I was not understanding this.

  • I went completely dark and I said, You know what?

  • I have a crisis now because I really don't understand Japan.

  • What is being Japanese?

  • Right?

  • And so I asked a bunch of Japanese friends of mine, What is Japanese?

  • And there's a bunch of different ideas.

  • It came out right, and for me, this is more of the surface, right?

  • This is something that describes Japanese, but it's thanking into the essence of Japanese.

  • So then I thought to myself, there must be words that could describe this right?

  • So every language has words that cannot be translated very well, right?

  • The French have wanna write and Italians, they don't even have a word there just like this, right?

  • Right.

  • And so I thought, What are those words?

  • And Japanese is surely not kimono, right?

  • That's Japanese.

  • It's only Japanese, but it doesn't describe what Japanese is.

  • So then I thought, OK, so there's 44 words I came up with which I call the pillars of being Japanese.

  • Right?

  • So one of them is no court means.

  • Okay, Okay.

  • So Japanese 95% of Japanese came up growing growing up on a farm.

  • And it's very much planning.

  • And we're very steady, hardworking, conservative.

  • This is the base root of Japanese.

  • And then you think about the major revolution that came in.

  • And they talked about more about the samurai spirit of competition, sugi and detailed and then thinking about being a tenant of things.

  • And this is very, very different.

  • It's very important to realize, of course, the chapel.

  • The Germans are very calm, picky, they're very perfectionistic, but they're perfectionistic in order to get a result of being efficient.

  • The Japanese are the only culture that I know of that are being perfect to be perfect, right?

  • There's no other reason, has no result.

  • Just want to be perfect, right?

  • But the next the third pillar is ah, sewn show.

  • So having respect, respect for your elders, respect for others and really respect for nature.

  • So it's very much part of Shinto religion that says that we're part of nature.

  • So this is the 3rd 3rd pillar, and the fourth pillar is wow and so prioritizing others, thinking of the other first before thinking of yourself and thinking inside and outside.

  • And a lot of confusion exists because a lot of times Americans like that wasn't very well, but that's because they were outside the walk, and that only applies for inside the wall.

  • So all these four print pillars, you put them together, and it provides a framework for understanding Japanese.

  • And if we think about all those concepts, they actually all fit into being part of Japanese.

  • So and they all fit perfectly in this.

  • So, first of all, we have to think one by one of these and we think about, uh, the songs we can think about son show, uh, or complicate E each one of these.

  • Let's think about 11 example that most foreigners have have seen, as they say, You know what?

  • Chaplains are so considerate.

  • I couldn't believe that they had 20 minutes that went out of the way to go and take me to a station that was great and the same person said.

  • But you know what?

  • I had another one that said No English, no English.

  • They ran away.

  • So what is behind that?

  • If you think like an American, you're thinking does that polite?

  • They don't seem polite, and some people apply and some people are not.

  • So that's not the right way.

  • The framework to think about the framework is Come pick.

  • You should be right.

  • The Japanese who ran away.

  • Oh, I'm not worthy.

  • My English is not good.

  • I have to run off, right?

  • And then the other person Who's that?

  • You know, I I can really try and gonna be as perfect as I can.

  • So let's think about each one of these as we as we go along the Kansai experience.

  • So what was going on there?

  • It's on the upper left.

  • You see, the Americans were putting on a show.

  • Americans are great and putting on the show right.

  • They have the dance and the singing and all the stuff.

  • And the Japanese were like Our English is no good And although you know, what are we gonna do?

  • We have not practiced and we're not dancing.

  • And so they said, If it's compact is shagging, they thought, Okay, that doesn't really hit because it's it's not come pecking.

  • The next one is sewn Show it applied, but they were really respectful of American teams.

  • They're like all those Americans are some pie.

  • They're doing so well.

  • And when they found about someone, show that like we can't respect ourselves.

  • But we respect in the Americans more and this doesn't work.

  • The final one is Wah, and while they were thinking, there's 12 teams tenable, more American and the year before and you team one and they're thinking, How could a Japanese team win this year that disrupts the whole spirit of while because in Japan that wouldn't happen, that you wouldn't have to foreign teams win two years in a row, so they were thinking about it in this this way and it didn't work again.

  • So what dropped out.

  • The one thing that that did work is no call means Ochoa.

  • And, yeah, we were tarred, but that entered.

  • But that's not enough for them that feel really good about that.

  • And if I could say one thing to that team at that time is you know what?

  • Americans are judging you by a completely different standard.

  • A judge on results and our results were number one by far.

  • We get from number four to number to be proud of that, right?

  • And the other thing is, they're looking at your sincerity.

  • They look at you on the stage and they're saying they're really trying hard.

  • Their English is so bad.

  • But it's okay.

  • You're trying and you know what?

  • That's that's That's what I want to say to Japanese who don't feel perfect enough.

  • And they're English is bad.

  • Don't worry about that.

  • Just try, right?

  • Just don't worry about it.

  • Don't be come pecking about.

  • So the next thing is, is, can this explain?

  • The four poets can explain other more complex topics.

  • So, for example, um, we have bushido.

  • So Bushido is simply perfection of respect.

  • Com picky and sansho, right?

  • And if we think about talk to Maya and Hyundai.

  • This has a lot of this is difficult for a lot of Americans.

  • This is the whole concept of off trying to hold back your true opinions because you don't want to insult the person.

  • Oh, that's a really bad tie, right?

  • Or you don't want to say your true opinion.

  • You want to hold back on it because you're respecting the other and you're tryingto have a spirit of what right and so that this is really good.

  • And this is Americans have troubles with us.

  • A lot of times it is there.

  • They think they're always speaking home day.

  • But Americans actually have having us as well in the culture, and, you know, it's called.

  • It's called the Elephant in the Room.

  • Okay, It's the one thing that everyone knows they can see a big elephant, but nobody wants to say anything that's called Tuttle my for Americans.

  • Americans actually have this, too.

  • Then you can think about other concepts like, uh um, the O check.

  • I eso chica is simply perfection a lot, right?

  • It's all the perfect movements as you pass your teacup from person to person, and you really feel this perfect harmony.

  • Um And then and then you also have hot sun all day.

  • And Hudson today, the New Year celebration is kind of a combination of all the the four pillars, right?

  • Every year you have your traditions, and I think this is at the very, very center of the four Pillars.

  • You have rules and processes, and this is really respected in Japan, like no other culture.

  • Right?

  • Rules are protected, all right.

  • And you know, when you think about that, the process becomes shoot con.

  • We think about habits.

  • Um, and we think about what does this mean for business to A lot of businessmen asked me, Hey, how do I change my company?

  • How do we improve things right?

  • And so we can think about that, too.

  • So if you think about our cultural keys sometimes instead of the farming culture, you have to think about the hunting culture.

  • Um, we have to think about being perfect.

  • Be agile, be flexible, right?

  • If we're thinking about sewn shown respect instead of respecting the past or respecting your elder respect results in the future, instead of saying wow, think about frontier spirit and actually these four things.

  • They describe American culture, and this is no doubt one reason why America is so successful in Silicon Valley and starting new things.

  • But Japan cannot emulate and just copy Americans.

  • That's that's not the right way and approach it.

  • That doesn't work for Americans trying to be Japanese, either.

  • So what it has to do is you have to think about the Japanese air really, really good at process.

  • So just like they happened in the major revolution, just like Postwar Japan, they took processes from abroad, and they were able to apply that to improve.

  • So Japan has to think about the same way.

  • Um, so in short, you can think I'm American and I'm Japanese, and if you put the two together, it could be a banana, which is yellow on the outside and white on the inside.

  • That's a simple explanation.

  • But you know what?

  • I think I'm something far more.

  • I have special ingredients and thinking about the special ingredients, which are, and of a special recipe, which is the four pillars.

  • I think I've been able to kind of create a banana cream Hot s o something a little bit different and, um, so identity crisis is resolved.

  • Um, thank you for listening to my four keys of being Japanese.

  • And it's just the top by Ted.

  • Thank you.

has up.

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A2 初級

アイデンティティの危機|テッド・タカギ|TEDxTokyoSalon (Identity Crisis | Ted Takagi | TEDxTokyoSalon)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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